Political Cartoon: Radical Democrats are Lawbreakers

Political Cartoon:

Radical Democrats are Lawbreakers

No Rules for Radicals

Republicans continue to treat politics as though it’s a gentlemen game, while Democrats are in it to win at all cost. Political Cartoon by A.F. Branco ©2019.

More A.F. Branco cartoons at FlagAnd Cross.com here.

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Push Back: Border Wall Funding Found; Free Speech on Campus or else

Push Back:

Border Wall Funding Found; Free Speech on Campus or else

Pentagon identifies $12.8 billion in funding for the wall

The money will come from funds already allocated for various military construction projects in the states.

By Rick Moran

The Pentagon has identified $12.8 billion in military construction spending that could be used to fund the building of a wall on the southern border.

The money has already been appropriated but not spent and is targeted for various stateside military facilities.  It’s unclear which projects would be affected.

Washington Examiner:

It’s a question of priorities.  Should building a new PX at a Georgia military base be given a higher priority than building a wall?  That’s the Pentagon’s reasoning, and, given the president’s declaration of a national emergency, it’s not a hard call.

Not all the projects will be scrapped.  Some may be delayed; other long-term projects could see reduced funding on a year-to-year basis.  The allocation of money is somewhat at the discretion of the secretary.

The point is, the money is there whenever Trump wants to use it.  There will no doubt be temporary court injunctions to prevent any construction immediately, but with the emergency declaration, the delay is not likely to be a long one.

Pentagon identifies $12.8 billion in funding for the wall
Mar 20, 2019 01:00 am

CNN Stunned to Find Pro-Trump Latinos: We Want ‘Longer and Taller’ Wall

 

Executive Order: Free Speech on Campus or No $$$

Donald Trump Demands Universities Comply with Free Speech Requirements to Receive Federal Grants

President Donald Trump signed an executive order on Thursday requiring universities receiving federal grants to certify that they follow free speech principles.

“The president strongly supports free speech,” a senior administration told reporters during a briefing on the upcoming order. “American institutions of higher education should support open intellectually engaging debate, which is critical to creating the next generation of successful leaders and thinkers.”

The order directs twelve federal grant-making agencies and the Office of Management and Budget to ensure that schools receiving federal research or education grants uphold the First Amendment and principles of free inquiry. The order will not apply to student aid, the official confirmed.

All universities already follow certain criteria to get federal aid, and the president’s order will include free speech on campus as one of the requirements.

“Agencies will enforce the order how they are already enforcing grant conditions,” the official said, who confirmed that the new requirements would take several weeks to implement.

The president signed his executive order on free speech on Thursday at 3:30 p.m.

 

Exec Order: Free Speech on Campus or No $$$…

Report: Trump Could Save Billions by Ending ‘Press 2 for Spanish’

 

Is Trump embracing Brazil to teach Germany a lesson?
Mar 20, 2019 01:00 am
Are we about to have a new NATO member?

ADL: Extremist Killings DOWN 39% Under Trump

History Facts: World War 1 Heroes, American Exceptionalism in History honored by United States Congress

History Facts:

World War 1 Heroes, American Exceptionalism in History honored by United States Congress

Embracing the American’s Creed

By Paul S. Gardiner

It’s a safe bet that most Americans do not know that year 2018 was the 100th anniversary of the adoption of the American’s Creed by the United States Congress (House of Representatives).  In April of 1918, the Congress accepted the words composed in 1917 by William Tyler Page during World War I as the official American’s Creed.

Referring to the Creed, Page said: “It is the summary of the fundamental principles of the American political faith as set forth in its greatest documents, its worthiest traditions, and its greatest leaders.”  His wording of the Creed includes passages and phrases from the Declaration of Independence, the Preamble to the Constitution, Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, and Daniel Webster’s reply to Robert Y. Hayne in the Senate in 1830.  The Creed reads as follows:

I believe in the United States of America as a Government of the people, by the people, for the people; whose just powers are derived from the consent of the governed; a democracy in a Republic; a sovereign Nation of many sovereign States; a perfect Union, one and inseparable; established upon those principles of freedom, equality, justice, and humanity for which American patriots sacrificed their lives and fortunes. I therefore believe it is my duty to my Country to love it; to support its Constitution; to obey its laws; to respect its flag; and to defend it against all enemies.

If today’s politicians, at all levels of government but especially members of the United States Congress, strongly embraced and let the American’s Creed guide their daily actions and decisions, this would certainly be in the best interest of America.  Such a lifestyle should help overcome, hopefully in a major way, the terribly bitter and divisive political environment that presently exists in America.  Americans of all backgrounds and situations need to unite under the banner of the American’s Creed!

Paul S. Gardiner is an avid lover of America living in Hoschton, Ga.  He is a graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of Alabama, and Army War College.

Judeo-Christian Worldview: Time to be a Spiritual Warrior, Salt of the Earth

Judeo-Christian Worldview:

Time to be a Spiritual Warrior, Salt of the Earth

In coming days, it will not be possible to survive spiritually without the guiding, directing, comforting, and constant influence of the Holy Ghost. ~Russell M. Nelson

Spiritual warfare in the culture

Ed Vitagliano

American Family Association Journal

January-February 2019 – It is clear that America is in the midst of a moral, political, and cultural upheaval that rivals that of the 1960s – or perhaps even the Civil War era.

Furthermore, a Christian would have to be totally devoid of discernment to miss the clear signs of a devastating spiritual war engulfing our land and its people.

Here are seven principles outlining the reality of the spiritual warfare that exists behind the curtain of the culture chaos.

1. There is a spiritual reality behind earthly conflict.


Of course, the most obvious place to start is in Ephesians 6:10-18, arguably the most familiar spiritual warfare passage in the Bible. Paul teaches that Christians are enveloped in a “struggle.” However, the struggle appears to exist only in the realm of the physical world – i.e., people and circumstances. But our struggle is “not against flesh and blood.” It’s actually a much deeper battle.

When you consider the ongoing culture war in our nation, it’s not about what we might think it is. It seems as if the natural world is all that matters, but it’s not. It’s not simply the politics, the trash coming out of Hollywood, or the hundred other things that are convulsing our country.

There are evil powers assaulting the church and the truth. That’s what this is all about. They are enslaving millions in thick chains of darkness and dragging them away into ruin.

2. That spiritual conflict requires a heavenly perspective.


Notice that Paul says these demonic powers dwell “in the heavenly places.” Who else is in the heavenly places? Of course, Jesus Christ is seated at the right hand of God – far above all wicked spiritual rulers (Ephesians 1:20-21).

The church is also seated “with Him in the heavenly places in Christ Jesus” (Ephesians 2:5-6). What is the church doing up there in the heavenlies? Positionally, we are seated in heavenly places because Christ is there, we are in Christ, and wherever He is, we are.

However, despite the fact that we live natural lives down here, we must view our battles from up there. In other words, we must have a heavenly perspective. We must have God’s perspective – an eternal perspective.

Psalm 2 offers a perfect example of that reality. The nations rage against the Lord and His Christ. They scheme and conspire to break away from
His restraints.

We might see that and get very, very angry. Like Jesus’s disciples, we might want to call fire down from heaven and devour sinners. We forget that we, like our spiritual enemies now, were once rebels and blasphemers.

But God sits in heaven and laughs at their strategies – because He knows the final outcome. In fact, God knows that some of those very same rebels will one day repent and join themselves to Him. In the midst of the battle, Christians should also be encouraged that our God is sovereign – and in control of history.

3. The coming of Jesus Christ brought light into darkness.


In Matthew 4:12-17, we see that those who dwelled in darkness and “the shadow of death” saw a “great Light” – the coming of the Son of God to earth. The core message of Jesus Christ was “Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand.”

It is hard for us to comprehend the spiritual state of the world when Jesus came. Other than Israel – and a few scattered Jewish communities – everywhere one traveled, from one end of the earth to the other, there were only idolatry, false religion, and spiritual darkness. There was not a single lamp lit by biblical truth. There was no temple other than those occupied by demons. There were no priests or priestesses other than those who counseled people away from the One true God.

The oppressive grip of darkness was broken the moment Jesus was born. He was and is the Light of the world, and His coming, like the invasion of Normandy in 1944, was an invasion of occupied territory.

4. Christians carry on the work established by Christ.


We are the follow-up to this invasion – and we push ever forward into the darkness. Matthew 5:13-16 declares that we are the salt of the earth and the light of the world.

For 2,000 years, a faithful portion of the church has taken seriously the words of Christ that we be salt (opposing decay and death) and light (opposing darkness and delusion).

Proof of this is found in a simple fact: The earth is no longer in complete and total darkness, as the light continues to blaze brightly!

5. The “empire always strikes back.”

 

by Carl Bloch

Wherever light goes, however, it immediately comes into conflict with darkness. Remember the core message of Jesus as He entered the world system? “Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand” (Matthew 4:17).

That is absolutely a challenge to the darkness. Jesus is announcing that the authority of heaven has come, and all people are commanded to cease their wicked ways.

In Acts 17:30, Paul says, “Therefore having overlooked the times of ignorance, God is now declaring to men that all people everywhere should repent.”

However, the powers of darkness do not slink away, whipped, into the shadows. Those “spiritual forces of wickedness in the heavenly places” that Paul mentioned in Ephesians 6? They are ferocious and totally depraved demonic entities, with seething hatred for all things and all people that point to God.

This means we can always expect a satanic response as we move to shine the light of God’s truth in the darkness.

6. There are only two sides in this war.

He that is not with me is against me. ~ Jesus Christ, Matthew 12:30


Therefore, as we might expect, there’s no demilitarized zone. People must choose their side. There is no room for wimpy Christians who will not stand for the truth or who worry about offending people. We don’t have to be jerks, but we do have to be warriors.

This is one of the powerful messages of the book of Revelation, where we see but two choices – the Lamb of God and the beast from the sea; two women – the bride of Christ and the harlot of Babylon; and two cities – the New Jerusalem (the holy city) and Babylon (the great city).

As a result, there are only two destinies for the souls who inhabit this battlefield: those who have their names written in the Lamb’s book of life and those who do not. There is no middle ground.

7. We are an expression of that war – right now in America.


We are to resist the dark lies of this hierarchy of demonic leadership using every spiritual weapon at our disposal. However, “spiritual” doesn’t mean there is no accompanying natural effort.

We can stand for righteousness and God’s truth in a hundred different ways. Obviously we can pray, preach, and teach, but we can also write a letter to the editor, rebuild a flooded home, serve food in a soup kitchen, offer counsel in front of an abortion clinic – or vote!

If Christians can’t see that the culture war is a manifestation of a spiritual war, they’re blind. If Christians can’t see that this is a time to be salt and light, they’re disobedient.

This is a day when every soldier of light must put on the full armor of God and stand in the gap for America – because if she falls, all of Western Civilization falls with her.

Action Plan to Equip Your Family for Spiritual Warfare—START HERE

 

YouTube Music: Spring Awakening with Music of the Heart

Dinner Topics for Friday

YouTube Music: Spring Awakening with Music of the Heart

All things denote there is a God; yea, even the earth, and all things that are upon the face of it, yea, and its motion, yea, and also all the planets which move in their regular form do witness that there is a Supreme Creator. ~Alma 30:44

Listen to more of Jordan’s uplifting music at Spotify for free!

See Jordan’s latest release, free download, and more, HERE

rainyday4 rainyday3 rainyday1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Listen to the . . .

Raindrops

Lovely, soothing, refreshing. . .

by Jordan New Age Music

“Raindrops” from his album “Solace”, Jordan “takes you to an added dimension.” Download or pick up this album on http://www.cdbaby.com/jordan13

rainyday2 rainyday5

waterspring waterfall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Welcome . . .

Spring Flow

 

 

 

“Spring Flow”  from his album “Solace”, Jordan “takes you to an added dimension.” Download or pick up this album on http://www.cdbaby.com/jordan13

 

 

Louis L’Amour Books: Classic Western Fiction Quotations

Classic Western Fiction Quotations

From unforgettable author: Louis L’Amour

2nd Amendment

You will remember that we won our freedom because we were armed. We were not a simple peasantry unused to weapons. The men who wrote our Constitution knew our people would be safe as long as they were armed. (Lonesome Gods, 216)

Western Civilization

keyIf men are to survive upon the earth there must be law, and there must be justice, and all men must stand together against those who would strike at the roots of what men have so carefully built. (Lonesome Gods, 415)

Here in these western lands men were fighting again the age-old struggle for freedom and for civilization, which is one that always must be fought for. The weak and those unwilling to make the struggle, soon resign their liberties for the protection of powerful men or paid armies; they begin by being protected, they end by being subjected. ~ Louis L’Amour (Man Called Noon)

Appeasement

We have a saying that power corrupts.

It does. Such rulers begin by demanding a little and end by demanding all. Power not only corrupts he who  wields the power but those who submit to it. Those who grovel at the feet of power betray their fellows to hide themselves beyond the cloak of submission. It is an evil thing. (Haunted Mesa, 293)

You cannot submit to evil without allowing evil to grow. Each time the good are defeated, or each time they yield, they only cause the forces of evil to grow stronger. Greed feeds greed, and crime grows with success. Our giving up what is ours merely to escape trouble would only create greater trouble for someone else. (Man Called Noon)

LAmour-cherokee-trailThere’s pushy folks around this country, and if they start pushing you, you have to push back. If you don’t they’ll soon push you out of the country. (Taggart)

Character

They had never learned how to rationalize, and their world was a simple one where right and wrong were quite obvious. Where the Long Grass Grows, 145

To die is not so much, it is inevitable. The journey is what matters, and what one does along the way. (Ferguson Rifle, 97-98).

Pride can be a dangerous associate, and a thinking man should beware of it.  (Ferguson Rifle, 165)

We’re not talking about what’s fair or unfair. We’re talking realities. (Comstock Lode, 49)

Uncommonly shrewd? no. Possibly not shrewd at all. Perhaps only a man who moved into whatever opening appeared, taking every advantage. Often the man appears shrewd who is only ruthless and without scruples.  (Comstock Lode, 331)

But I am somebody. I am me. I like being me, and I need nobody to make me somebody. I need no setting. As for a home, I can build my own. As for position, each of us finds his own.  (Comstock Lode, 333)

Generations will follow who must themselves live from that land …It would not be enough to leave something for them; we must leave it all a little better than we found it. (Lonesome Gods, 373)

Hatred is an ugly thing, more destructive of the hater than the hated. (Lonesome Gods, 371)

All he would say was to ask me, “Do you think you did the right thing?”

A question like that sticks in a man’s mind, and after awhile I judged everything by it, deciding whether it was the right thing, and often if there was no other way. I expect it was a good lesson to learn, but a man in his life may have many teachers, some most unexpected. The question with the man himself: Will he learn from them? (Fast Draw)

For a man to be at peace with himself was important, Will said, not what people say. People are often wrong, and public opinion can change, and the hatreds of people are rarely reasonable things. I can hear him yet. He used to say there was no use a man wearing himself out with hatred and ill-feeling, and time proved it out. First Fast Draw, 27

Me, I was never likely to build anything. A no-account drifter like me leaves no more mark behind him

than you leave a hole in the water when you pull your finger out. Every man could leave something, or should. Well, maybe it wasn’t in me to build much, but I surely could keep the work of other men from being destroyed. Nobody had the right to take from them what they had built. (Ride the Dark Trail, 101)

The thing to remember when traveling is that the trail is the thing, not the end of the trail. Travel too fast and you miss all you are traveling for. (Ride the Dark Trail, 53)

A man had to see, not just look. (The Quick and the Dead, 18)

It’s the way with women. [They] fall for a man, then set out to change him. Soon’s they got him changed they don’t like him no more. Never seen it to fail. (Outlaws of Mesquite, 32)

The man had charted his own course, followed his own trail. If it led to death … he had probably saved himself from a bullet or a noose, for he was headed for one or the other. When a man begins a life of violence, or when he decides to live by taking something away from others, he just naturally points himself toward one end. He can’t win—the odds are too much against him. (Mustang Man, 93)

Walking opens the mind to thought.

LAmour-western2We have to earn our place, just like all the others. There’s no special sun that shines on any man, regardless of religion, philosophy, or the color of his skin. There’s no reason why any man should expect a special dispensation from pope or president. In this country, more than any other, you have to make your mark. You’re not going to be treated like something special until you are.

Some men become outlaws. They can’t make a living honestly, so they try to do it by force and strength.

That is the hardest question of history, the question people have asked in every age, in every time. Many men want what other men have. Men are often greedy, jealous, and vindictive. Or they look across the fence at what they think is greener grass.(Dry Side)

LAmour-brionneThe wood with which we work has strength, it has beauty, it has resilience! If it is treated well, it will last many, many years! If you build, build well. No job must be slackly done, no good material used badly. There is beauty in building, but build to last, so that generations yet to come will see the pride with which you worked. (Rivers West, 113)

Remember this. If you stop pushing on, you lose. It is always a little further to the top than you think. (Reilly’s Luck, 17)

Riding the wild country gives a man time to think, and Will Reilly had encouraged thinking. “You have to be objective,” he had said. “Each problem must be taken by itself, and you have to leave emotion out of it. Be stern with yourself. Don’t pamper yourself.” (Reilly’s Luck, 94)

Think nothing of treasure and stories of treasure. You will have in this world just what you earn … and save. Remember that. Do not waste your life in a vain search for treasure that may not exist. (Rivers West, 64)

A mill does not turn upon water that is past, nor does a ship sail with the winds of yesterday. (Rivers West, 5)

LAmour-skibbereenI am a poor man, and no fortune will come to me unless I earn it with me two hands. The hands and the will, they’re all I have. (Man from Skibbereen, 39)

“I could come to hate them!”

“Don’t. Isn’t worth it, Molly. I don’t hate anybody and never have. A man does what he has to do, and sometimes it’s not what I believe he should do. There’s no reason to use up energy hating him for it.

“If a man comes at me, I defend myself. If he hunts me, I figure I can hunt some myself.” (Milo Talon, 156)

There was something else, too, that was not generally recognized—that just as the maternal instinct is the strongest a woman has, just so the instinct to protect is the strongest for a man. (Mountain Valley War, 10)

They know who they are, they know what they believe in, and their kind will last. Other kinds of people will come and go. The glib and confident, the whiners and complainers, and the people without loyalty, they will disappear, but these people will still be here plowing the land, planting crops, doing the hard work of the world because it is here to be done. (Mountain Valley War, 12)

LAmour-ben-shafterYou’ve a good mind, too. Don’t let it go to seed. A brain is only as good as you give it a chance to be. (Mountain Valley War, 65)

There was a cold, bitter anger within him. For a moment he looked back, felt the weight of the guns at his hips, and remembered the contempt of Cub Hale, the arrogance of his father. No … now was not the time. Jody was gone, and Wilson too, but what they had fought for must not be lost. The surest way to make Hale pay was not to kill him but to destroy him and what he had done, to win so the rest of them could keep their homes. (Mountain Valley War, 130)

Sometimes a man’s ego gets so inflated that other people … are to be brushed aside. Well, he destroyed himself … when he brushed a man aside the other day who will haunt him the rest of his life. (Mountain Valley War, 141)

Do not let yourself be bothered by the inconsequential. One has only so much time in this world, so devote it to the work and the people most important to you, to those you love and things that matter. One can waste half a lifetime with people one doesn’t really like, or doing things when one would be better off somewhere else.” (Ride the River, 35)

Courage

LAmour-westernDo not be afraid. A little fear can make one cautious. Too much fear can rob you of initiative. Respect fear, but use it for an incentive, do not let it bind you or tie you down. (Lonesome Gods, 218-219)

They had come upon me in a mob, too cowardly to face me alone, and no man deserves to be beaten and hammered by a mob, and the men who make up a mob are cowards. First Fast Draw, 36

They had mobbed me, beaten me, and for no reason. Yet they had declared war, I had not. First Fast Draw, 38

There’s some who will remember you and be afraid, and men try to destroy anybody they are scared of.  First Fast Draw, 45

Only a fool takes chances. That isn’t bravery, not one bit. The good fightin’ man never takes chances he can avoid. You have to take plenty you can’t help, and only a fool would go to gambling with his life.

When I was a kid they told me I was scared for not walkin’ a small log over a high canyon. The other kids all did it, but not me. Now if there had been something on the other side I wanted, I would have gone over after it if there was no other way to get it. I never did see any sense in taking chances that weren’t necessary. There’s a sight of difference between being brave and being a dang fool. (Rustlers of West Fork, 131)

Trouble? All my life there’s been trouble, and where man is there will be trouble to the end of time, if not of one kind, then another. But I take my trouble as it comes. (Showdown at Yellow Butte, 86)

Culture

Men destroy what they do not understand, as they destroyed the son of God when he chose to walk among them. (Lonesome Gods, 512)

LAmour-quick-n-deadIs it to be a place where only business is done? Simply a marketplace, or is it to be a place of beauty? The great cities, the remembered cities, are the cities known for their beauty. (Lonesome Gods, 218)

Because a custom is old is no reason for junking it. (Long grass, 56)

The empty people, they wanted nothing more; they chafed at bonds because they were not mature enough for discipline, the kind of discipline one gives himself. He had seen too many of them, sad, misguided people, railing at institutions and ideas they were too juvenile to accept. The important thing in life called for maturity, for responsibility. Too many fled from it, wanting to be back in childhood when somebody else coped with the problems. Long Grass, 86

I had no grudge against any man, nor did I know what it meant to hate. To be wary, yes, for I knew there were hating folks about, but for myself, I hated no man. Only there was a point beyond which I’d not be pushed. First Fast Draw,15

The good people …made less noise and attracted less attention. (Rustlers of West Fork, 211)

Defend Right and Truth

LAmour-utah-blaineYou have to fight for most of the things worth having … or somebody does. (The Quick and the Dead, 116)

A man can get killed taking things for granted. (Ride the Dark Trail, 52)

Me, I was never likely to build anything. A no-account drifter like me leaves no more mark behind him than you leave a hole in the water when you pull your finger out. Every man could leave something, or should. Well, maybe it wasn’t in me to build much, but I surely could keep the work of other men from being destroyed. Nobody had the right to take from them what they had built. (Ride the Dark Trail, 101)

Education

He who ceases to learn is already a half-dead man. And do not be like an oyster who rests on the sea bottom waiting for the good things to come by. Search for them, find them. (Lonesome Gods, 39)

Family

There’s nothing better than two, a man and woman, who walk together. When they walk right together there’s no way too long, no night too dark. (Ride the Dark Trail, 49)

Long ago we had come from England and Wales, but the family feeling within us was older still, old as the ancient Celtic clans I’d heard spoken of. It was something deep in the grain, but something that should belong to all families …everywhere. I did not envy those who lacked it. (Ride the Dark Trail, 65)

“Her? Really? But she’s nobody. She’s just a broken-down nester’s daughter.”

“Everybody is somebody to me.” (Ride the Dark Trail, 202)

Government

There is no greater role for a man to play than to assist in the government of a people, nor anyone lower than he who misuses that power. (Lonesome Gods, 373

LAmour-flintA man is only king as long as folks let him be. (Ride the Dark Trail, 87)

You’ve got to make a stand somewhere. We are making a decision here today whether this community is to be ruled by justice and by law or by force and crime. (Law of Desert Born. 218)

What we have most to fear, I believe, are those within our own borders who think less of country than of themselves, who are ambitious for money, for power, for land. Some of these men would subvert anything, anything at all, for their own profit. They would even twist the laws of their own country in their desire to acquire wealth or power. Such men are always prepared to listen to a smooth-talking man with a proposal. (Rivers West, 27)

You must remember that if we leave the governing to others, then others will govern, and possibly not as we would like. In a country such as this, none of us is free of responsibility. Good government is everybody’s business. ~ Louis L’Amour (Rivers West, 29)

You know, Jack, there’s a clause in the Constitution that says the right of an American to keep and bear arms shall not be abridged. The man who put that clause there had just completed a war that they won simply because seven out of every ten Americans had their own rifles and knew how to use them. They wanted a man to always be armed to defend his home or his country. Right now there is a man in this area who is trying to take away that liberty and freedom from some men. (Mountain Valley War, 13)

One could not yield to the lawless and the ruthless, or soon there would be no freedom. It was among men as it was among nations. (Mountain Valley War, 85)

Davy was said to be a sort of Robin Hood bandit who took from the rich to give to the poor. If he was like most of those Robin Hood bandits I’d heard tell of, the poor he gave to was himself or over the bar in the nearest tavern. (Ride the River, 59)

History

All history is important to us. From each we learn a little about survival, a little about what causes peoples to decay and nations to die. We try to learn from others so we shall not make the same mistakes, but many of us learn simply for the love of knowing. (Haunted Mesa, 159)

LAmour-ride-riverMen needed stories to lead them to create, to build, to conquer, even to survive, and without them the human race would have vanished long ago. (Lonesome Gods, 142)

Not until 1818 had a firm boundary been established between the United States and Canada along the forty-ninth parallel from the Rainy Lake to the Rockies.

Only recently had the treaty been signed with Spain ceding Florida to the United States and defining the western border of the Louisiana Purchase at the forty-second parallel. The Untied States had renounced claims to Texas, and rights to many parts of this great new land were openly disputed.

The changing status of the slave trade had caused a number of slave traders to abandon the sea. In 1808 a law had been passed forbidding the importation of slaves into the United States, and even now a bill was before Congress that would make foreign slave trade an act of piracy punishable by death. Although the smuggling of slaves would almost certainly continue, many of those traders who wished to take no chances were leaving the trade and looking for a fresh area for their talents. (Rivers West, 39-40)

“I cannot believe this is happening to me. I cannot believe that those men would be as brutal as you say.”

“Nobody ever believes it until it is too late. Everyone has the same idea: that it could not happen to them. It is always happening to somebody else, and you see it in the papers and don’t credit it.”

~Louis L’Amour (Man from Skibbereen, 48)

Liberty

Are you prepared to lose all this? To have someone else reap where you have sown? You must fight or be enslaved. (Haunted Mesa, 270)

You will remember that we won our freedom because we were armed. We were not a simple peasantry unused to weapons. The men who wrote our Constitution knew our people would be safe as long as they were armed. (Lonesome Gods, 216)

He had breathed the free air of a free country too long and had the average American’s fierce resentment of tyranny. (Desert Born, 201)

LAmour-westward-tideMobs must be anonymous. Most men who make up mobs act under influence of the crowd. Singled out and suddenly alone, they become uncertain and uneasy. Deliberately, he let them know that he knew them. Deliberately, he walked among them, making each man feel known, cut off. He must break their shell of mob thinking and force each man to think of his own plight and the consequences to himself. He must make each man sure he was recognized, known. As a mass, thinking with one mind, they were dangerous, but if each began to worry …(Desert Born, 226-228)

Any man can run a town with killings, if he is fast enough. To clean up a tough town without killing, that takes a man!” (Desert Born, 232)

They were God-fearing, stern, and fierce to resent any intrusion on their personal liberty. It was such men as these who had destroyed Major Patrick Ferguson and his command at King’s Mountain. Not understanding what manner of men he dealt with, Ferguson had threatened them with fire and hanging, and they had responded by coming down from the mountains with their long Kentucky rifles. These were the sort of men who had been the backbone of the early American armies.

They were like Ethan Allen, Daniel Boone, the Green Mountain boys, Kit Carson, and Jim Bridger. There was also a fierce resentment for those who abused their power. (Mountain Valley War, 19-20)

Propaganda

They believe too hard. Men will give up anything rather than what they want to believe. And hate you for telling them there’s nothing to believe. And even if you prove it to them, they’ll continue to believe, and hate you for proving them foolish. ~Louis L’Amour

Political Cartoon: College Admissions Scandal and Elizabeth Warren Fauxcahontas

Political Cartoon:

College Admissions Scandal and Elizabeth Warren Fauxcahontas

Elizabeth Warren says she has zero sympathy for the parents involved in the admissions scandal but wait, how did she get into Harvard? Political Cartoon by A.F. Branco ©2019.

See more Legal Insurrection Branco cartoons, click here.

Abuse of Power Fraud Alert: College Admissions Scandal—Actresses Bribe Colleges—Here’s Why

Abuse of Power Fraud Alert:

College Admissions Scandal—Actresses Bribe Colleges—Here’s Why

Famous Actresses Paid Bundles Of Money To Bribe Their Kids’ Way Into College. Here’s Why.

Ben Shapiro

On Tuesday, the Department of Justice charged 50 people with involvement in a scheme that allowed rich parents to bribe college and testing officials to smooth the path for their children’s admission into top colleges. According to The Washington Post, the “alleged crimes included cheating on entrance exams, as well as bribing college officials to say certain students were coming to compete on athletic teams when those students were not in fact athletes.” Targeted schools included Yale, Stanford, UCLA, Georgetown, and the University of Southern California.

Felicity Huffman of Desperate Housewives fame, and Lori Loughlin of Full House.

Fraudulent Bribe to Correct Daughter’s SAT Scores

Huffman allegedly paid $15,000 as a faux charitable donation to the Key Worldwide Foundation so her daughter could be admitted to a top college; the money actually went toward paying a third party to correct her daughter’s SAT scores, boosting it to 1420 from 400 points lower on a practice SAT the year earlier.

The question is why. Both these families are wealthy. The children of these families weren’t going to lack for opportunity in life. Furthermore, isn’t college designed to train people for the real world? Wouldn’t admission under false pretenses result in the kids flunking out? Wouldn’t their lack of merit be revealed by the simple pressure of the schooling?

The answer is obvious: no, it wouldn’t. Colleges aren’t about training kids for the real world, or teaching them significant modes of thinking, or examining timeless truths. Universities aren’t about skill sets, either – at least in the humanities. They’re about two things: credentialism and social connections.

This provides a lifelong advantage: employers are willing to take more chances on those who earn a Yale degree than those who went to junior college, for example. 

Then there’s social connection. Social institutions in the United States have been fading over time. Churches used to provide us our chief means of social connection. Colleges now do. JD Vance writes in Hillbilly Elegy that admission to Yale Law School granted him social capital: “the networks of people and institutions around us have real economic value.” They also have social value. We often get jobs from friends, or from friends of friends. The social circles in which we travel matter. That’s true for those born rich as well as those born poor.

Here’s the problem: neither of these priorities actually demands that universities teach anything.

Credentialism occurs upon admission, so long as you aren’t thrown out of school; social capital begins to accrue with presence, not with performance. Hence colleges watering down curricula and grades in order to make it easier to credential, and to generate less friction. That’s what students and parents demand: not skills, not education, but credentialism and social capital.

Kagan: “You’re IN! Competition is Over!”

After I was admitted to Harvard Law School, I attended orientation. Our 500-strong class was gathered in Memorial Hall, in historic Sanders Theater, where then-Dean Elena Kagan (now Supreme Court Justice) spoke to us. She informed us that the competition was over – we were in! No need to worry about the stuff we’d seen in The Paper Chase – we were all going to leave with degrees and jobs. Not just that – as graduates of Harvard Law, we were destined to rule the universe. She informed us of how many alumni were in the Senate, how many in Congress, how many on the Supreme Court. The battle was over upon our acceptance to the institution.

All of this has significant social ramifications, of course. It means that our meritocracy doesn’t begin in college – it ends, for many, upon admission to college. And that, in turn, means that the failures of our lower education system loom larger. It also means that in the absence of functional non-collegiate social institutions, the social gap between college-goers and non-college-goers will grow.

This also has significant political ramifications. It means that students admitted to colleges expect to be pampered, not challenged.

 Professor Harvey Mansfield of Harvard University was essentially forced by the administration not to give honest grades – he started giving two grades, one for merit, and then one for the administration, so as not to penalize people for taking his classes.

Politically, this also means that students expect not to be challenged – they expect to be comfortable. Professors who challenge their politics, for example, may threaten their “college experience” – which may, in turn, threaten their social capital. Professors who make students feel uncomfortable may be threatening the ease they were promised. Discomfort becomes a bug, not a feature, of higher education. Pampering becomes the rule.

That’s why rich and famous people would spend oodles of money just to get their kids into top universities: not because their kids won’t have jobs or will go hungry, but because they want their kids credentialed and admitted into the social club. This story, then, is less about people committing a crime, and more about a system that fails the tests of meritocratic education so badly that people can buy their way past the merit and the education.

Political Cartoon: Border Wall Funding is much less than Welfare for Non-Citizens

Political Cartoon:

Border Wall funding is much less than Welfare for Non-Citizens

No Crumbs for You

According to the latest figures, The cost of not having a wall is much more expensive than building a wall when you figure in welfare, healthcare, and housing for illegals. Pelosi remains blind. Political cartoon by A.F. Branco ©2019.

More A.F. Branco cartoons at FlagAnd Cross.com here.