Henry Hazlitt: Economics in One Lesson

Henry Hazlitt:

Economics in One Lesson—Choices and Consequences

This is the root of our economic problems today. People simply do not look at the long term consequences of their actions. Henry Stuart Hazlitt (November 28, 1894 – July 9, 1993)

 

Henry HazlittEconomics is haunted by more fallacies than any other study known to man. This is no accident. It can be boiled down, Hazlitt says, to two basic fallacies—the first causes the other.

  1. Selfish interests.
  2. The fallacy of overlooking secondary consequences.

Today is already the tomorrow which the bad economist yesterday urged us to ignore. The long-run consequences of some economic policies may become evident in a few months. Others may not become evident for several years. Still others may not become evident for decades. But in every case those long-run consequences are contained in the policy as surely as the hen was in the egg, the flower in the seed.

hazlitt-economics-one-lessonThe whole of economics can be reduced to a single lesson, and that lesson can be reduced to a single sentence.

The art of economics consists in looking not merely at the immediate but at the longer effects of any act or policy; it consists in tracing the consequences of that policy not merely for one group but for all groups.

THE LESSON APPLIED

brokenwindowLet us begin with the simplest illustration possible: let us, emulating Bastiat, choose a broken pane of glass.

A young hoodlum, say, heaves a brick through the window of a baker’s shop. The shopkeeper runs out furious, but the boy is gone. A crowd gathers, and begins to stare with quiet satisfaction at the gaping hole in the window and the shattered glass over the bread and pies. After a while the crowd feels the need for philosophic reflection. And several of its members are almost certain to remind each other or the baker that, after all, the misfortune has its bright side. It will make business for some glazier.

As they begin to think of this they elaborate upon it. How much does a new plate glass window cost? Fifty dollars? That will be quite a sum. After all, if windows were never broken, what would happen to the glass business? Then, of course, the thing is endless. The glazier will have $50 more to spend with other merchants, and these in turn will have $50 more

Failure of the New Economics

Failure of the New Economics

to spend with still other merchants, and so ad infinitum. The smashed window will go on providing money and employment in ever-widening circles. The logical conclusion from all this would be, if the crowd drew it, that the little hoodlum who threw the brick, far from being a public menace, was a public benefactor.

Now let us take another look. The crowd is at least right in its first conclusion. This little act of vandalism will in the first instance mean more business for some glazier. The glazier will be no less unhappy to learn of the incident than an undertaker to learn of a death.

But the shopkeeper will be out $50 that he was planning to spend for a new suit. Because he has had to replace a window, he will have to go without the suit (or some equivalent need or luxury). Instead of having a window and $50 he now has merely a window. Or, as he was planning to buy the suit that very afternoon, instead of having both a window and a suit he must be content with the window and no suit. If we think of him as a part of the community, the community has lost a new suit that might otherwise have come into being, and is just that much poorer.

The glazier’s gain of business, in short, is merely the tailor’s loss of business. No new “employment” has been added. The people in the crowd were thinking only of two parties to the transaction, the baker and the glazier.

They had forgotten the potential third party involved, the tailor. They forgot him precisely because he will not now enter the scene.

They will see the new window in the next day or two. They will never see the extra suit, precisely because it will never be made. They see only what is immediately visible to the eye.

Hazlitt: Foundations of Morality

Hazlitt: Foundations of Morality

Here is Hazlitt’s major philosophical work, in which he grounds a policy of private property and free markets in an ethic of classical utilitarianism.

Related Posts:

The Fallacy of the Greek Bailout, an amusing analogy

 

Christian Books: CS Lewis, Chronicles of Narnia, and Mere Christianity

Christian Books:

CS Lewis, Chronicles of Narnia, and Mere Christianity

Dinner Topics for Wednesday

keyExpert Children’s Book Reviewers tell us there is a great dearth of good literature for children and young adults. They are not being taught about God in schools, or even the Universal Morality that Lewis refers to. If we want our children to have good character, which is founded upon Judeo-Christian principles, we need to teach them ourselves. C S Lewis’ work  will bless families for generations to come.  Let’s start today to strengthen our families—turn off the TV and reach for these timeless classics.  ~C A Davidson

Related post on moral compass

From Wikipedia

C.S._Lewis,_BelfastClive Staples Lewis (29 November 1898 – 22 November 1963), commonly called C. S. Lewis and known to his friends and family as “Jack”, was a novelist, poet, academic, medievalist, literary critic, essayist, lay theologian, and Christian apologist. Born in Belfast, Ireland, he held academic positions at both Oxford University (Magdalen College), 1925–1954, and Cambridge University (Magdalene College), 1954–1963. He is best known both for his fictional work, especially The Screwtape Letters, The Chronicles of Narnia, and The Space Trilogy, and for his non-fiction Christian apologetics, such as Mere Christianity, Miracles, and The Problem of Pain.

Lewis and fellow novelist J. R. R. Tolkien were close friends. Both authors served on the English faculty at Oxford University, and both were active in the informal Oxford literary group known as the “Inklings“. According to his memoir Surprised by Joy, Lewis had been baptized in the Church of Ireland (part of the Anglican Communion) at birth, but fell away from his faith during his adolescence. Owing to the influence of Tolkien and other friends, at the age of 32 Lewis returned to the Anglican Communion, becoming “a very ordinary layman of the Church of England“.[1] His faith had a profound effect on his work, and his wartime radio broadcasts on the subject of Christianity brought him wide acclaim.

Narnia-CS LewisIn 1956, he married the American writer Joy Davidman, 17 years his junior, who died four years later of cancer at the age of 45. Lewis died three years after his wife, from renal failure, one week before his 65th birthday. Media coverage of his death was minimal; he died on 22 November 1963—the same day that U.S. President John F. Kennedy was assassinated, and the same day another famous author, Aldous Huxley, died. In 2013, on the 50th anniversary of his death, Lewis will be honoured with a memorial in Poets’ Corner, Westminster Abbey.

Lewis’s works have been translated into more than 30 languages and have sold millions of copies. The books that make up The Chronicles of Narnia have sold the most and have been popularized on stage, TV, radio, and cinema.

Christian apologist

In addition to his career as an English professor and an author of fiction, Lewis is regarded by many as one of the most influential Christian apologists of his time; Mere Christianity was voted best book of the twentieth century by Christianity Today in 2000.[58] Due to Lewis’s approach to religious belief as a sceptic, and his following conversion, he has been called “The Apostle to the Skeptics.”

Lewis was very interested in presenting a reasonable case for Christianity. Mere Christianity, The Problem of Pain, and Miracles were all concerned, to one degree or another, with refuting popular objections to Christianity, such as “How could a good God allow pain to exist in the world?”. He also became known as a popular lecturer and broadcaster, and some of his writing (including much of Mere Christianity) originated as scripts for radio talks or lectures.[59][page needed]

According to George Sayer, losing a 1948 debate with Elizabeth Anscombe, also a Christian, led Lewis to reevaluate his role as an apologist, and his future works concentrated on devotional literature and children’s books.[60] Anscombe, however, had a completely different recollection of the debate’s outcome and its emotional effect on Lewis.[60] Victor Reppert also disputes Sayer, listing some of Lewis’s post-1948 apologetic publications, including the second and revised edition of his Miracles in 1960, in which Lewis addressed Anscombe’s criticism.[61] Noteworthy too is Roger Teichman’s suggestion in The Philosophy of Elizabeth Anscombe[62][page needed] that the intellectual impact of Anscombe’s paper on Lewis’s philosophical self-confidence should not be overrated: “… it seems unlikely that he felt as irretrievably crushed as some of his acquaintances have made out; the episode is probably an inflated legend, in the same category as the affair of Wittgenstein’s poker. Certainly Anscombe herself believed that Lewis’s argument, though flawed, was getting at something very important; she thought that this came out more in the improved version of it that Lewis presented in a subsequent edition of Miracles – though that version also had ‘much to criticize in it’.”

Lewis also wrote an autobiography titled Surprised by Joy, which places special emphasis on his own conversion. (It was written before he met his wife, Joy Gresham; the title of the book came from the first line of a poem by William Wordsworth.) His essays and public speeches on Christian belief, many of which were collected in God in the Dock and The Weight of Glory and Other Addresses, remain popular today.

His most famous works, the Chronicles of Narnia, contain many strong Christian messages and are often considered allegory. Lewis, an expert on the subject of allegory, maintained that the books were not allegory, and preferred to call the Christian aspects of them “suppositional“. As Lewis wrote in a letter to a Mrs. Hook in December 1958:

If Aslan represented the immaterial Deity in the same way in which Giant Despair [a character in The Pilgrim’s Progress] represents despair, he would be an allegorical figure. In reality however he is an invention giving an imaginary answer to the question, ‘What might Christ become like, if there really were a world like Narnia and He chose to be incarnate and die and rise again in that world as He actually has done in ours?’ This is not allegory at all.[63]

“Trilemma”

Main article: Lewis’s trilemma

In a much-cited passage from Mere Christianity, Lewis challenged the view that Jesus, although a great moral teacher, was not God. He argued that Jesus made several implicit claims to divinity, which would logically exclude this:

I am trying here to prevent anyone saying the really foolish thing that people often say about Him: ‘I’m ready to accept Jesus as a great moral teacher, but I don’t accept his claim to be God.’ That is the one thing we must not say. A man who was merely a man and said the sort of things Jesus said would not be a great moral teacher. He would either be a lunatic – on the level with the man who says he is a poached egg – or else he would be the Devil of Hell. You must make your choice. Either this man was, and is, the Son of God, or else a madman or something worse. You can shut him up for a fool, you can spit at him and kill him as a demon or you can fall at his feet and call him Lord and God, but let us not come with any patronising nonsense about his being a great human teacher. He has not left that open to us. He did not intend to.[64]

This argument, which Lewis did not invent but developed and popularized, is sometimes referred to as “Lewis’s trilemma“. It has been used by the Christian apologist Josh McDowell in his book More Than a Carpenter (McDowell 2001). Although widely repeated in Christian apologetic literature, it has been largely ignored by professional theologians and biblical scholars.[65]

Lewis’s Christian apologetics, and this argument in particular, have been criticized. Philosopher John Beversluis described Lewis’s arguments as “textually careless and theologically unreliable,”[66] and this particular argument as logically unsound and an example of false dilemma.[67] Theologian John Hick argues that New Testament scholars do not now support the view that Jesus claimed to be God,[68] New Testament scholar N. T. Wright criticizes Lewis for failing to recognize the significance of Jesus’ Jewish identity and setting – an oversight which “at best, drastically short-circuits the argument” and which lays Lewis open to criticism that his argument “doesn’t work as history, and it backfires dangerously when historical critics question his reading of the gospels,” although he believes this “doesn’t undermine the eventual claim.” [69]

Lewis used a similar argument in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, when Digory Kirke advises the young heroes that their sister’s claims of a magical world must logically be taken as either lies, madness, or truth.[61]

Universal morality

right-wrongsignOne of the main theses in Lewis’s apologia is that there is a common morality known throughout humanity. In the first five chapters of Mere Christianity Lewis discusses the idea that people have a standard of behaviour to which they expect people to adhere. This standard has been called Universal Morality or Natural Law. Lewis claims that people all over the earth know what this law is and when they break it. He goes on to claim that there must be someone or something behind such a universal set of principles.[70]

These then are the two points that I wanted to make. First, that human beings, all over the earth, have this curious idea that they ought to behave in a certain way, and cannot really get rid of it. Secondly, that they do not in fact behave in that way. They know the Law of Nature; they break it. These two facts are the foundation of all clear thinking about ourselves and the universe we live in.[71]

Lewis also portrays Universal Morality in his works of fiction. In The Chronicles of Narnia he describes Universal Morality as the “deep magic” which everyone knew.[72]

In the second chapter of Mere Christianity Lewis recognizes that “many people find it difficult to understand what this Law of Human Nature … is”. And he responds first to the idea “that the Moral Law is simply our herd instinct” and second to the idea “that the Moral Law is simply a social convention”. In responding to the second idea Lewis notes that people often complain that one set of moral ideas is better than another, but that this actually argues for there existing some “Real Morality” to which they are comparing other moralities. Finally he notes that sometimes differences in moral codes are exaggerated by people who confuse differences in beliefs about morality with differences in beliefs about facts:

I have met people who exaggerate the differences, because they have not distinguished between differences of morality and differences of belief about facts. For example, one man said to me, “Three hundred years ago people in England were putting witches to death. Was that what you call the Rule of Human Nature or Right Conduct?” But surely the reason we do not execute witches is that we do not believe there are such things. If we did – if we really thought that there were people going about who had sold themselves to the devil and received supernatural powers from him in return and were using these powers to kill their neighbours or drive them mad or bring bad weather, surely we would all agree that if anyone deserved the death penalty, then these filthy quislings did. There is no difference of moral principle here: the difference is simply about matter of fact. It may be a great advance in knowledge not to believe in witches: there is no moral advance in not executing them when you do not think they are there. You would not call a man humane for ceasing to set mousetraps if he did so because he believed there were no mice in the house.[73]

Lewis also had fairly progressive views on the topic of “animal morality”, in particular the suffering of animals, as is evidenced by several of his essays: most notably, On Vivisection[74] and “On the Pains of Animals.”[75][76]

Legacy

Lewis continues to attract a wide readership. In 2008, The Times ranked him eleventh on their list of “the 50 greatest British writers since 1945”.[77] Readers of his fiction are often unaware of what Lewis considered the Christian themes of his works. His Christian apologetics are read and quoted by members of many Christian denominations.[78] In 2013, on the 50th anniversary of his death, Lewis will join some of Britain’s greatest writers recognized at Poets’ Corner, Westminster Abbey.[79]

Lewis has been the subject of several biographies, a few of which were written by close friends, such as Roger Lancelyn Green and George Sayer. In 1985 the screenplay Shadowlands by William Nicholson, dramatising Lewis’s life and relationship with Joy Davidman Gresham, was aired on British television, starring Joss Ackland and Claire Bloom. This was also staged as a theatre play starring Nigel Hawthorne in 1989, and made into the 1993 feature film Shadowlands starring Anthony Hopkins and Debra Winger. In 2005, a one-hour television movie entitled C. S. Lewis: Beyond Narnia, starring Anton Rodgers, provided a general synopsis of Lewis’s life.

Read more about C.S. Lewis

 

Political Cartoon: Trump vs. Democrats, Swamp Creatures

Political Cartoon:

Trump vs. Democrats, Swamp Creatures

A.F. Branco Cartoon – A Tight Fit

cartoon-trump vs deep stateThe biggest problem Washington D.C. has with President Trump is that he isn’t playing by the deep state’s rules,  so they want to remove him by any means possible. Political cartoon by A.F. Branco ©2019.

More A.F. Branco cartoons at FlagAnd Cross.com here.

Character Education: Faith, Decision-making, and Charlie Brown

Character Education:

Faith, Decision-making, and Charlie Brown

Charles Schultz. In fond Remembrance of Charles Monroe “Sparky” Schulz (/ʃʊlts/; November 26, 1922 – February 12, 2000)[2] was an American cartoonist and creator of the comic strip Peanuts (which featured the characters Charlie Brown and Snoopy, among others). He is widely regarded as one of the most influential cartoonists of all time.

Choose Wisely

Quentin L. Cook

keyold“Refuse the evil, and choose the good” (Isaiah 7:15).

 

My desire this evening is to share some counsel about decisions and choices.

Lucy Rationalizes

charlie-brown-lucy-baseballWhen I was a young lawyer in the San Francisco Bay Area, our firm did some legal work for the company that produced the Charlie Brown holiday TV specials.1 I became a fan of Charles Schulz and his creation—Peanuts, with Charlie Brown, Lucy, Snoopy, and other wonderful characters.

One of my favorite comic strips involved Lucy. As I remember it, Charlie Brown’s baseball team was in an important game—Lucy was playing right field, and a high fly ball was hit to her. The bases were loaded, and it was the last of the ninth inning. If Lucy caught the ball, her team would win. If Lucy dropped the ball, the other team would win.

charlie-brown-lucyAs could happen only in a comic strip, the entire team surrounded Lucy as the ball came down. Lucy was thinking, “If I catch the ball, I will be the hero; if I don’t, I will be the goat.”

The ball came down, and as her teammates eagerly looked on, Lucy dropped the ball. Charlie Brown threw his glove to the ground in disgust. Lucy then looked at her teammates, put her hands on her hips, and said, “How do you expect me to catch the ball when I am worried about our country’s foreign policy?”

This was one of many fly balls Lucy dropped through the years, and she had a new excuse each time.2 While always humorous, Lucy’s excuses were rationalizations; they were untrue reasons for her failure to catch the ball.

Decisions Determine Destiny

It is important to rise above rationalizations and make the best choices.

freewill1During the ministry of President Thomas S. Monson, he has often taught that decisions determine destiny.3 In that spirit my counsel tonight is to rise above any rationalizations that prevent us from making righteous decisions, especially with respect to serving Jesus Christ. In Isaiah we are taught we must “refuse the evil, and choose the good.”4

I believe it is of particular importance in our day, when Satan is raging in the hearts of men in so many new and subtle ways, that our choices and decisions be made carefully, consistent with the goals and objectives by which we profess to live. We need unequivocal commitment to the commandments and strict adherence to sacred covenants. When we allow rationalizations to prevent us from temple endowments, worthy missions, and temple marriage, they are particularly harmful. It is heartbreaking when we profess belief in these goals yet neglect the everyday conduct required to achieve them.5

Some young people profess their goal is to be married in the temple but do not date temple-worthy individuals. To be honest, some don’t even date, period! You single men, the longer you remain single after an appropriate age and maturity, the more comfortable you can become. But the more uncomfortable you ought to become! Please get “anxiously engaged”6 in spiritual and social activities compatible with your goal of a temple marriage.

Some postpone marriage until education is complete and a job obtained. While widely accepted in the world, this reasoning does not demonstrate faith, does not comply with counsel of modern prophets, and is not compatible with sound doctrine.

I recently met a fine teenage young man. His goals were to go on a mission, obtain an education, marry in the temple, and have a faithful happy family. I was very pleased with his goals. But during further conversation, it became evident that his conduct and the choices he was making were not consistent with his goals. I felt he genuinely wanted to go on a mission and was avoiding serious transgressions that would prohibit a mission, but his day-to-day conduct was not preparing him for the physical, emotional, social, intellectual, and spiritual challenges he would face.7 He had not learned to work hard. He was not serious about school or seminary. He attended church, but he had not read the Book of Mormon. He was spending a large amount of time on video games and social media. He seemed to think that showing up for his mission would be sufficient. Young men, please recommit to worthy conduct and serious preparation to be emissaries of our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ.

My concern is not only about the big tipping-point decisions but also the middle ground—the workaday world and seemingly ordinary decisions where we spend most of our time. In these areas, we need to emphasize moderation, balance, and especially wisdom. It is important to rise above rationalizations and make the best choices.

Everyday Decisions

A wonderful example of the need for moderation, balance, and wisdom is the use of the Internet. It can be used to do missionary outreach, to assist with priesthood responsibilities, to find precious ancestors for sacred temple ordinances, and much more. The potential for good is enormous. We also know that it can transmit much that is evil, including pornography, digital cruelty,8 and anonymous yakking. It can also perpetuate foolishness. As Brother Randall L. Ridd poignantly taught at the last general conference, speaking of the Internet, “You can get caught up in endless loops of triviality that waste your time and degrade your potential.”9

Frivolous Distractions

When we turn down the volume and examine the substance, there is very little that will assist us in our eternal quest toward righteous goals.

RushSocialMedia2PIXDistractions and opposition to righteousness are not just on the Internet; they are everywhere. They affect not just the youth but all of us. We live in a world that is literally in commotion.10 We are surrounded by obsessive portrayals of “fun and games” and immoral and dysfunctional lives. These are presented as normal conduct in much of the media.

Elder David A. Bednar recently cautioned members to be authentic in the use of social media.11 A prominent thought leader, Arthur C. Brooks, has emphasized this point. He observes that when using social media, we tend to broadcast the smiling details of our lives but not the hard times at school or work. We portray an incomplete life—sometimes in a self-aggrandizing or fake way. We share this life, and then we consume the “almost exclusively … fake lives of [our] social media ‘friends.’” Brooks asserts, “How could it not make you feel worse to spend part of your time pretending to be happier than you are, and the other part of your time seeing how much happier others seem to be than you?”12

Sometimes it feels like we are drowning in frivolous foolishness, nonsensical noise, and continuous contention. When we turn down the volume and examine the substance, there is very little that will assist us in our eternal quest toward righteous goals. One father wisely responds to his children with their numerous requests to participate in these distractions. He simply asks them, “Will this make you a better person?”

When we rationalize wrong choices, big or small, which are inconsistent with the restored gospel, we lose the blessings and protections we need and often become ensnared in sin or simply lose our way.

Erosion of Judeo-Christian Values

But when culture, knowledge, and social mores are separated from God’s plan of happiness and the essential role of Jesus Christ, there is an inevitable disintegration of society.

apathydudeI am particularly concerned with foolishness13 and being obsessed with “every new thing.” In the Church we encourage and celebrate truth and knowledge of every kind. But when culture, knowledge, and social mores are separated from God’s plan of happiness and the essential role of Jesus Christ, there is an inevitable disintegration of society.14 In our day, despite unprecedented gains in many areas, especially science and communication, essential basic values have eroded and overall happiness and well-being have diminished.

When the Apostle Paul was invited to speak on Mars Hill in Athens, he found some of the same intellectual pretension and absence of true wisdom that exist today.15 In Acts we read this account: “For all the Athenians and strangers which were there spent their time in nothing else, but either to tell, or to hear some new thing.”16 Paul’s emphasis was the Resurrection of Jesus Christ. When the crowd realized the religious nature of his message, some mocked him; others essentially dismissed him, saying, “We will hear thee again of this matter.”17 Paul left Athens without any success. Dean Frederic Farrar wrote of this visit: “At Athens he founded no church, to Athens he wrote no epistle, and in Athens, often as he passed its neighbourhood, he never set foot again.”18

Subtle Influences

Many choices are not inherently evil, but if they absorb all of our time and keep us from the best choices, then they become insidious.

bigbenclockI believe Elder Dallin H. Oaks’s inspired message distinguishing between “good, better, best” provides an effective way to evaluate choices and priorities.19 Many choices are not inherently evil, but if they absorb all of our time and keep us from the best choices, then they become insidious.

Even worthwhile endeavors need evaluation in order to determine if they have become distractions from the best goals. I had a memorable discussion with my father when I was a teenager. He did not believe enough young people were focused on or preparing for long-term important goals—like employment and providing for families.

Meaningful study and preparatory work experience were always at the top of my father’s recommended priorities. He appreciated that extracurricular activities like debate and student government might have a direct connection with some of my important goals. He was less certain about the extensive time I spent participating in football, basketball, baseball, and track. He acknowledged that athletics could build strength, endurance, and teamwork but asserted that perhaps concentrating on one sport for a shorter time would be better. In his view, sports were good but not the best for me. He was concerned that some sports were about building local celebrity or fame at the expense of more important long-term goals.

Given this history, one of the reasons I like the account of Lucy playing baseball is that, in my father’s view, I should have been studying foreign policy and not worrying about whether I was going to catch a ball. I should make it clear that my mother loved sports. It would have taken a hospitalization for her to miss one of my games.

I had decided to follow my dad’s advice and not play intercollegiate sports in college. Then our high school football coach informed me that the Stanford football coach wanted to have lunch with Merlin Olsen and me. Those of you who are younger may not know Merlin. He was an incredible all-American tackle on the Logan High School football team where I played quarterback and safety and returned kickoffs and punts. In high school Merlin was recruited by most football powers across the nation. In college he won the Outland Trophy as the nation’s best interior lineman. Merlin was ultimately the third overall pick in the National Football League draft and played in an amazing 14 consecutive Pro Bowls. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1982.20

The lunch with the Stanford coach was at the Bluebird restaurant in Logan, Utah. After we shook hands, he never once made eye contact with me. He talked directly to Merlin but ignored me. At the end of the lunch, for the first time, he turned toward me, but he could not remember my name. He then informed Merlin, “If you choose Stanford and want to bring your friend with you, he has good enough grades and it could probably be arranged.” This experience confirmed for me that I should follow my dad’s wise counsel.

cook-choices-192x192My intent is not to discourage participation in sports or the use of the Internet or other worthwhile activities young people enjoy. They are the kind of activities that require moderation, balance, and wisdom. When used wisely, they enrich our lives.

However, I encourage everyone, young and old, to review goals and objectives and strive to exercise greater discipline. Our daily conduct and choices should be consistent with our goals. We need to rise above rationalizations and distractions. It is especially important to make choices consistent with our covenants to serve Jesus Christ in righteousness.21 We must not take our eyes off or drop that ball for any reason.

This life is the time to prepare to meet God.22 We are a happy, joyous people. We appreciate a good sense of humor and treasure unstructured time with friends and family. But we need to recognize that there is a seriousness of purpose that must undergird our approach to life and all our choices. Distractions and rationalizations that limit progress are harmful enough, but when they diminish faith in Jesus Christ and His Church, they are tragic.

My prayer . . . we will make our conduct consistent with the noble purposes required of those who are in the service of the Master. In all things we should remember that being “valiant in the testimony of Jesus” is the great dividing test between the celestial and terrestrial kingdoms.23 We want to be found on the celestial side of that divide. As one of His Apostles, I bear fervent testimony of the reality of the Atonement and the divinity of Jesus Christ, our Savior.

 

  1. Lee Mendelson-Bill Melendez Production TV Specials.
  1. From the moons of Saturn distracting her to worrying about possible toxic substances in her glove, Lucy always rationalized why she dropped the ball.
  1. See “Decisions Determine Destiny,” chapter 8 in Pathways to Perfection: Discourses of Thomas S. Monson (1973), 57–65.
  1. Isaiah 7:15.
  1. “If to do were as easy as to know what were good to do, chapels had been churches and poor men’s cottages princes’ palaces” (William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, act 1, scene 2, lines 12–14).
  1. Doctrine and Covenants 58:27.
  1. See Adjusting to Missionary Life (booklet, 2013), 23–49.
  1. See Stephanie Rosenbloom, “Dealing with Digital Cruelty,” New York Times, Aug. 24, 2014, SR1.
  1. Randall L. Ridd, “The Choice Generation,” Ensign or Liahona, May 2014, 56.
  1. See Doctrine and Covenants 45:26.
  1. See David A. Bednar, “To Sweep the Earth as with a Flood” (speech delivered at BYU Campus Education Week, Aug. 19, 2014); lds.org/prophets-and-apostles/unto-all-the-world/to-sweep-the-earth-as-with-a-flood.
  1. Arthur C. Brooks, “Love People, Not Pleasure,” New York Times, July 20, 2014, SR1.
  1. Unfortunately, one diversion that has increased in our day is pure foolishness. When the Savior enumerated some of the things that can defile man, He included foolishness (see Mark 7:22).
  1. This happened in ancient Greece and Rome, as well as with the Book of Mormon civilizations.
  1. See Frederic W. Farrar, The Life and Work of St. Paul (1898), 302. There were philosophers of all kinds, including Epicureans and Stoics, rival groups who some described as the Pharisees and the Sadducees of the pagan world. See also Quentin L. Cook, “Looking beyond the Mark,” Ensign, Mar. 2003, 41–44; Liahona, Mar. 2003, 21–24.
  1. Acts 17:21.
  1. Acts 17:32.
  1. Farrar, The Life and Work of St. Paul, 312.
  1. See Dallin H. Oaks, “Good, Better, Best,” Ensign or Liahona, Nov. 2007, 104–8.
  1. Merlin Olsen was a hall of fame football player, actor, and NFL commentator for NBC. He won the Outland Trophy playing football for Utah State University. He played pro football for the Los Angeles Rams. On TV he played Jonathan Garvey opposite Michael Landon on Little House on the Prairie and had his own TV program, Father Murphy. Merlin is now deceased (Mar. 11, 2010), and we miss him very much.

 

Political Cartoon: Left wing War on America—President Trump on Front line

Political Cartoon:

Left wing War on America—President Trump on Front line

A.F. Branco Cartoon – MAGA Shield

Keep in mind, with all the mud being slung at President Trump by the Deep State, the Media, and the Democrats, they’re really aiming at us. Political cartoons by A.F. Branco ©2019.

More A.F. Branco Cartoons at The Daily Torch.

 

Political Cartoon: Schiff Kangaroo Court vs. Republicans for Rule of Law

Political Cartoon:

Schiff Kangaroo Court vs. Republicans for Rule of Law

A.F. Branco Cartoon – Schiffty Justice

schiff injusticeSchiff’s kangaroo court is in session minus the same fairness that was afforded the Nixon and Clinton impeachment formalities. Political cartoon by A.F. Branco ©2019.

More A.F. Branco Cartoons at The Daily Torch.

War on America: Rush Limbaugh, Defending the Faith vs. Left wing Destruction of Religious Freedom

War on America:

Rush Limbaugh, Defending the Faith vs. Left wing  Destruction of Religious Freedom

They’re scared to death of religious people because American leftists and socialists do not like the competition that God provides. In their world, the state is where everyone must turn for everything. ~Rush Limbaugh

In a commercial at a democrat debate, Ron Reagan Jr defended atheists. An agnostic, who is unsure whether there is a God, called the Rush Limbaugh show. Following is Rush Limbaugh’s response. ~C.D.

Agnostic Defends Ron Reagan Jr’s Freedom from Religion Ad

faithCALLER: As Ingersoll described it, “An agnostic believes that the universe is structured in such away such that it is impossible to determine whether or not there’s a God.”

RUSH: I’m a believer, and I agree with that. That’s why there’s faith.

CALLER: All right.

Faith Does Not Cancel Reason

Faith and ReasonRUSH: That’s why there’s faith. You don’t have any faith; I do.

CALLER: But faith is the opposite, in my book at least — and I bet in your book, too, Rush. Faith is the opposite of reason and reason is what built this civilization and reason (crosstalk).

RUSH: One doesn’t cancel the other out. Just because you have faith does not mean you are not able to reason at the same time. It doesn’t mean you’re abandoning reason just because you have faith.

CALLER: Well, I’ve been reading theology for about 65 years now. Well (crosstalk).

RUSH: You desperately want to believe, then?

CALLER: What’s that?

RUSH: You desperately want to believe?

Faith MountainsCALLER: Well, of course we want to believe and we also don’t want to die. I think that’s what fuels the belief in God. That’s my hunch. But I can’t prove that, and that’s a shame. But I’m telling you, again, now, God bless Rush Limbaugh. By the way, if not for Rush Limbaugh I — Rush Hudson Limbaugh I — there would be no, obviously, Rush Limbaugh II or Rush Limbaugh III. Therefore, there would be no President Limbaugh inaugurated on the 20th of January 2029 —

RUSH: Right. (chuckle)

CALLER: — which is gonna be a Monday, by the way, just as August 1, 1988, was.

RUSH: Brian, thank you for the call. That’s classic, folks. That’s classic. His point was… He kind of raced over it, but his point is, “Hey, Rush, I’m an agnostic. I don’t believe in God. I didn’t find anything particularly wrong with Ron Reagan’s little commercial in the Democrat debate, but I listen to you. There’s a lot of people listen to you, Rush, that are agnostic. Some are atheists. You don’t know, Rush, but you got all kinds of people in your audience so you better be careful who you’re critical of.”

I do not get into personal religious beliefs here because I don’t want to ever go down the road of criticizing somebody else’s precisely because it is faith.

And I frankly believe faith is a tremendously valuable thing, characteristic. I think faith creates so many positives in people — has the potential to. It’s much better than having none. But some people don’t. It’s their business. We do radio here, not church. That’s why I don’t delve into it and never have. But we do do politics here. I want to set the table again. For those of you who missed it, I can think of no better advertisement, product placement than I saw Wednesday night in the Democrat debate.

Democrats despise Christians, Pro-Life people

Trump: US a Christian nationNow, who are the modern-day Democrats? Well, they really publicly despise evangelicals. They despise the so-called Religious Right. They despise people like Jerry Falwell, Jerry Falwell Jr., Pat Robertson. They despise the pro-life movement. They hated Phyllis Schlafly. They make no bones about the fact that they think people that believe in God are a bunch of hayseed hicks who have gun racks in the back of pickup trucks, and they show up in the church parking lot on Thursday night to get a good parking spot for the sermon on Sunday.

They think you’ve got no front teeth. You sit around chewing tobacco, playing the banjo on the front porch — even if it rains. They have the most condescending, arrogant view toward religious people. And they’re scared to death of religious people because American leftists and socialists do not like the competition that God provides. In their world, the state is where everyone must turn for everything.

Not church, not God-d, not the Bible. They go as far as they can to mock and impugn and laugh at those people. However, every four years they have to dial that back because they know that even though the number of people in recent polling data who admit to being Christian or religious is declining, there’s still a sizable number of them that they don’t want to offend. When you get near the election, the Democrats dial this stuff back, other than on abortion.

Democrats skirt religion on Abortion issue

democrats vs ChristiansBut when they talk about abortion near election time, they don’t talk about it in a religious vein. They talk about “a women’s right to choose.” They talk about, “It’s a health care issue. Pregnancy is an illness. Pregnancy can kill you.” Yes, if the Democrats are in charge of the baby. So given that we have now something called the Freedom From Religion Foundation, and they wanted to run an ad to raise money. So they’re asking themselves, “Where would be the best place to run our ad?”

And they obviously said, “Not on Fox News. We’d offend too many people there.” So they decided the best place to run their ad ripping and criticizing religion and Christianity would be in the middle of the Democrat presidential debate. So I want you to picture it. Here are… Oh. By the way, did you hear the ratings for this debate Wednesday night were in the tank? They dropped almost half their audience from the last Democrat debate.

When ABC did a debate, PMSNBC did a debate, they had 14-15 million people. CNN barely scraped together eight million people for three hours in prime time. It was a dud! In that regard, the product-placement specialists for the Freedom From Religion Foundation kind of made a mistake. But their thinking, you can’t blame ’em. “Okay. We hate religion. They don’t want to raise money from other people that do.

“Where are we likely to find people that hate religion?” And they said, “The Democrat debate!” And they were right. So here you are, you’re watching a Democrat debate and you’re watching these people with their inanities and their impeachment scenarios and all of this, and then Anderson Cooper says, “Well, we must take a brief break here — a brief time-out — to give the candidates a chance to catch up.

Agnostic Defends Ron Reagan’s Freedom from Religion Ad

 

YouTube Video, Classical Music, and Paderewski

Dinner Topics for Friday

 

key“Culture is defined as the way of life of a people. There is a unique gospel culture, a set of values and expectations and practices” common to all Christians. ~L. Tom Perry

YouTube Video: Paderewski Plays his Minuet in G, Op. 14, No 1; Recorded 1937: Listen Here

From Wikipedia

18 November [O.S. 6 November] 1860 – 29 June 1941) was a Polish pianist, composer, diplomat, politician, and the second Prime Minister of the Republic of Poland.

Ignacy Jan Paderewski was born in the village of Kurilovka, Litin uyezd in the Podolia Governorate, the Russian Empire. Today the village is part of the Khmilnyk raion of Vinnytsia Oblast, Ukraine. His father, Jan Paderewski, was an administrator of large estates. His mother, Poliksena (née Nowicka), died several months after Paderewski was born, and he was brought up by his distant relatives.

Initially he took piano lessons with a private tutor. At the age of 12, in 1872, he went to Warsaw and was admitted to the Warsaw Conservatorium. After graduating in 1878, he was asked to become a tutor of piano classes at his alma mater, which he accepted. In 1880 Paderewski married Antonina Korsakówna, and soon afterwards, their first child was born. The following year, they discovered that the son was handicapped; soon afterward, Antonina died. Paderewski decided to devote himself to music, and in 1881 he went to Berlin to study music composition with Friedrich Kiel[1] and Heinrich Urban. In 1884 he moved to Vienna, where he was a pupil of Theodor Leschetizky. It was in Vienna that he made his musical debut in 1887. He soon gained great popularity and his subsequent appearances (in Paris in 1889, and in London in 1890) were major successes. His brilliant playing created a furore which reached to almost extravagant lengths of admiration; and his triumphs were repeated in the United States in 1891. His name at once became synonymous with the highest level of piano virtuosity. However, not everyone was impressed. After hearing Paderewski for the first time, Moriz Rosenthal said: “Yes, he plays well, I suppose, but he’s no Paderewski”.[2]

From his early childhood, Paderewski was interested in music while living at the private estate near Zhytomyr where he moved with his father. However soon after his father’s arrest in connections with the January Uprising (1863), he was adopted by his aunt. After being released, Paderewski’s father married again and moved to the city of Sudylkov near Shepetovka.

He was extremely popular internationally, to such an extent that the music hall duo “The Two Bobs” had a hit song in 1916, in music halls across Britain, with the song “When Paderewski plays”.

During World War I, Paderewski became an active member of the Polish National Committee in Paris, which was soon accepted by the Entente as the representative of Poland. He became a spokesman of that organisation, and soon also formed other social and political organisations, among them the Polish Relief Fund in London. It was then that he met the English composer Edward Elgar, who used a theme from Paderewski’s Fantasie Polonaise[7] in his work Polonia written for the Polish Relief Fund concert in London on 6 July 1916.

In April 1918, he met in New York City with leaders of the American Jewish Committee, including Louis Marshall, in an unsuccessful attempt to broker a deal whereby organized Jewish groups would support Polish territorial ambitions in exchange for support for equal rights. However, it soon became clear that no plan would satisfy both Jewish leaders and Roman Dmowski, head of the Polish National Committee.[8]

At the end of the war, with the fate of the city of Poznań and the whole region of Greater Poland (Wielkopolska) still undecided, Paderewski visited Poznań. With his public speech on 27 December 1918, the Polish inhabitants of Poznań began a military uprising against Germany, called the Greater Poland Uprising.

In addition to his concert tours, Paderewski was a popular speaker who was renowned for his wit, and was often quoted. He was once introduced to a polo player with the words: “You are both leaders in your spheres, though the spheres are very different.” “Not so very different,” Paderewski replied. “You are a dear soul who plays polo, and I am a poor Pole who plays solo.”

In another incident, Paderewski once recalled, “I established a certain standard of behaviour, that, during my playing, there must be no talking. When they began to talk, I would stop. I would say, ‘I am sorry to interrupt your conversation. I deeply regret that I am obliged to disturb you, so I am going to stop for a while to allow you to continue talking.’ You can imagine the effect it had…”

Continued

Political Cartoon: Hypocrisy of the left vs. Donald Trump Jr

Political Cartoon:

Hypocrisy of the left vs. Donald Trump Jr

A.F. Branco Cartoon – Triggered

cartoon-left hypocrisy vs Don JrThe same media going out of their way to protect Hunter Biden are the same ones who are Triggered over Donald Trump jr. and the entire Trump family. Political cartoon by A.F. Branco ©2019.

More A.F. Branco Cartoons at The Daily Torch.

Culture Wars: Donald Trump Jr. New Book, Triggered, exposes Left wing radicals’ vicious attacks against Trump Family

Culture Wars:

Donald Trump Jr. New Book, Triggered, exposes Left wing radicals’ vicious attacks against Trump Family

Donald Trump Jr. Calls the Rush Limbaugh Show

I tell the story about going down in the elevator with him on June 16, 2015, and he just looked me in the eyes and the last thing he said before he then walked off to go down the escalator was, “Now we find out who our real friends are.”

So, it was a great statement for me because it was so telling, Rush, in that he knew it would be vicious. He knew it would be rough. He knew people who had known him for years — and you’ve seen it all. All these people now, “Trump’s terrible!” That’s weird. We’ve had dinner 15 times. All of a sudden, he’s terrible. But, more importantly, he knew all those things, and he did it anyway? And so it has been rough. I mean, listen. I’m a guy. I live in New York City. I have young kids. They go to school in New York City. We’ve gotten exploding envelopes of white-powder substance to our house. ~Donald Trump Jr.

Just read through this interview. It gives you an idea what the Trump family is going through. Whatever their imperfections, they are great patriots, unlike the swamp creatures who are trying to take them down. What one of us would have the courage to withstand the kind of abuse the whole family puts up with, day and night, 24/7, non-stop? You have to give credit where it’s due. ~C.D.

Nov 7, 2019

DONALD TRUMP JR.: We have to be vocal, we have to fight, we have to be willing to stand up.

RUSH: It’s really great to have Donald Trump Jr. with us. His new book is out. Triggered: How the Left Thrives on Hate and Wants to Silence Us. Welcome to the program, Don. As I say, it’s really great to have you here.

TRUMP JR.: It’s great to be with you, Rush. Thanks for having me.

Limbaugh and Trump at rallyRUSH: Now, I want to first… Before we get into the nuts and bullets of what’s happening now, I want to go back to 2015 and even prior. I want to ask you about your family and how all this has affected you. I ran into your sister, Ivanka, at the Cape Girardeau rally, and I said to her, “Y’all must be so proud.” Now, you’re right in the middle of the Russia thing. We’re coming up on election night. It’s the night before the 2018 midterms, and your father and everybody in your family are the targets of vile, vicious attacks. But I said to her, “You must be so proud.” What I meant was that your father had been elected president. What was that like? I mean, I’m sure your father has been a dynamic figure your whole life like he is for everybody else. But he decides to run for president. I’m sure it was a family decision. What was that like, the campaign? Trump Jr‘Cause I imagine… I know your dad. Your dad… I even talked to him a month after the election. He expected a month into it, that all the partisanship would die, and people would fall in line and really admire/respect what he wanted to do for the country. I told him I didn’t think that was gonna happen. But what was it like for all of you when this viciousness started and the attacks? I’ve tried to put myself in your shoes, and I’ve tried my best to understand it, but I wanted to hear from you.

TRUMP JR.: Well, listen. It was pretty brutal. I mean, I think that’s part of why I decided to write a book, right? I mean, we went through this thing — and, you know, he knew what he was gonna get into. Maybe we didn’t realize it would be as bad as it is because I can’t imagine it getting much worse especially over the last three years. I tell the story about going down in the elevator with him on June 16, 2015, and he just looked me in the eyes and the last thing he said before he then walked off to go down the escalator was, “Now we find out who our real friends are.”

So, it was a great statement for me because it was so telling, Rush, in that he knew it would be vicious. He knew it would be rough. He knew people who had known him for years — and you’ve seen it all. All these people now, “Trump’s terrible!” That’s weird. We’ve had dinner 15 times. All of a sudden, he’s terrible. But, more importantly, he knew all those things, and he did it anyway? And so it has been rough. I mean, listen. I’m a guy. I live in New York City. I have young kids. They go to school in New York City.

liberals vs americaWe’ve gotten exploding envelopes of white-powder substance to our house. I’m the number 2 most threatened protectee of the United States Secret Service after my father because I’m willing to be vocal and speak for him and do so without just giving up and folding. And, so, you know, it really does depend. I mean, it’s amazing to go around the country and see people who have benefited so much, and they tell me the stories about their jobs and businesses expanding and wages going up, and that’s awesome.

RUSH: Well, for us looking at it from our standpoint, it’s all surreal. Because, Don, none of this is real. There wasn’t any meddling with Russia, collusion. That was all done on the Democrat side. This phone call to the Ukrainian president is a nothing burger. They don’t have, they’ve never had any evidence about anything. They’re having to make it up. I’ve tried to put myself in your shoes day in and day out, and tried to imagine the frustration. It’s driving me crazy, and I’m not a Trump!

TRUMP JR.: Yeah. (chuckles) Well, it’s pretty bad, and it took me 41 years to realize it, but I’m probably a lot more like my father than I would have otherwise thought. I’m pretty vocal, I get pretty aggressive — and, you know, unlike many conservatives, if I get called out, I’m gonna push back. I’m gonna fight. So when backed in the corner like we have been… Don’t forget, I mean, a big part of the story of the book is, “Hey, I was the number 2 target of the Mueller hoax.” You know, this thing’s been going for a while.

CNN tweet admits a coupI wish I would have seen the same outrage when people were doxing our family, when those exploding envelopes are showing up to our apartment. You know, they don’t care  if that happened to my family and my kids. They don’t mind attacking Barron Trump who’s 13 years old. Hunter Biden’s off-limits — and, obviously, a CIA operative who’s worked for Joe Biden who’s a friend of Brennan and the coup clown guys. It’s pretty sick, and that’s the environment in which we live. So it’s been both amazing and Trump familyincredibly rough. I think the big outrage about me apparently dropping the name — even though it was out there in publications for days — of this supposed whistleblower is that now that the name’s out there, people are realizing, “Oh, he worked for Brennan?” You know, they had no problem with Brennan lying to Congress. They had no problem with any of this. But it was so convenient. (impression) “He’s a good… He’s a great public servant. Obviously, there’s no bias here. This is all about his disgust for what’s going on.” Oh, wait, so he’s tied to those guys? Shocking! RUSH: This whole thing’s a setup. The guy’s the Pajama Boy. The guy… He could be the model for Obama’s Pajama Boy health care commercials.

TRUMP JR.: It was him in the picture.

RUSH: We know the guy’s tied to Biden. We know that he’s tied to Brennan. But I want to go back to something you just said. You said you were the number two target of the Russia hoax thing, that honeypot, that lawyer, Veselnitskaya, that they tried to arrange.

RUSH: Okay. But, now, this is a reality, nevertheless, that you have to deal with. You know the game is rigged, and you know that the opposition is making it up as they go. You know that they’re trying to ruin you —

TRUMP JR.: Yeah.

RUSH: — and your father and your whole family. And you also know that they’re not going to stop.

TRUMP JR.: Right.

RUSH: They’re not gonna stop even after you win reelection. They’re gonna keep coming after you because they can’t allow outsiders like you to come in and gain control of the levers of power in government. So… I know you can’t give away specifics. How often do you meet to strategize how to deal with this? Because you know every day if they’ve got something new to make up or drop, they’re going to do it. I imagine you’d love a day or two of peace, but you know you’re not gonna get it. So how do you deal with it?

Donald and Melania TrumpTRUMP JR.: No, we’re at war, and we’re at war for our freedoms. We’re at war for our culture. You know, this is the largest divide between the two political parties in the history of the country. You know, I write a lot in the book about socialism and communism, ’cause my mother escaped from it. You know, I grew up with grandparents that lived through that stuff. You know, I spent summers in what was then communist Czechoslovakia.

I can tell you those bread lines that Bernie talks about are not nearly so wonderful. So, I get it. I tried… Actually, I don’t communicate with them. I do these things on my own. But that was blue checkmark Twitter yesterday. “Oh, my God! Donald Trump Jr. must have coordinated with the White House!” All right. The tweet? Like, apparently they haven’t been watching my feed. One of the interesting stories in the book is my father actually calling me, and I get the call from the White House. (impression) “This is White House operator. The president would like to speak to you.”

“Hey, Dad. What’s going on?”

the reality is, yes, we are under the gun. They will continue to do that. We are a threat to the deep state. And, by the way, if you didn’t believe in the deep state before 2016, I can actually understand that. If you don’t believe in them wholeheartedly now, you’re a fool, and their actions have shown us that. RUSH: Mark Zaid has confirmed the deep state. He’s proudly claimed membership in it. And he’s given up the ghost with his —

TRUMP JR.: He has.

RUSH: — with these discovered tweets. You guys were the target of an impeachment that began one week after your father was sworn in as president. Actually, it began before that.

Trump-PatriotTRUMP JR.: Well, it began on November 9th when he did the unthinkable, which was to beat the establishment. The Washington Post dropped their first headline about it 19 minutes after the inauguration, “The Case for Impeaching Trump.” Nineteen minutes, Rush, you know, that was about the amount of time that it took Obama to get nominated for the peace prize.

TRUMP JR.: That’s the difference between, you know, what we think. On The View today it was funny when they said, “Your father doesn’t take that much heat from the press.” I go, “Please name someone who’s taken more.” They go, “Obama.” I go, “Give me a break.” The press took an eight year vacation. It’s why they’re so energized now. Under the Obama administration there was nothing he could do wrong, regardless of the idiocy of the some of the policies, regardless of sending $150 billion to Iran —

RUSH: They all wanted to be —

TRUMP JR.: — a state sponsor of terror. It’s insanity.

hypocrisyRUSH: They all wanted to be Obama’s best friend. They still do. Look. You said something, you’re cramming a lot in here. You just said something that’s kind of profound. I want to go back to it, and it’s a huge difference. When Biden got elected VP, his son started working for foreign companies, traveling with his dad —

TRUMP JR.: Yeah.

RUSH: — to arrange these deals. When your father got elected, you and the rest of his children stopped working on international deals. Correct?

TRUMP JR.: Correct. We stopped doing new deals. Now, we had deals that we started in 2010. You can’t walk away from a building halfway through, but we stopped doing new deals. In our hotels, if someone from a foreign government comes in, we literally write a check back to the U.S. Treasury for the profits associated therewith. And that’s the nuance. That’s the false equivalency that the media refuses to acknowledge, refuses to run, and they still get there and they’re still trying to make sure they got the audit and they just pretend like it’s not actually happening.

And that’s the difference. You know, we were international businesspeople for decades. We gave it up. It’s a big part of why I’m so into politics ’cause frankly I did most of our international business. I did our deals abroad, and now that I can’t find or hunt for new deals, I got another thing.

Trump Jr book TriggeredRUSH: And we’re back with Donald Trump Jr. New book hot off the press destined for the top of the New York Times best-seller list, which is gonna irritate the New York Times. Triggered: How the Left Thrives on Hate and Wants to Silence Us.

I’m looking at the blurbs on the back. Ted Cruz says: “For far too long the left hammered away at our values. We did nothing. Donald Trump Jr.’s new book is a road map on how we fight back.”

RUSH: Now, Don, your life before all of this was whatever it was, but your life did not feature the kind of media mockery and hatred and disrespect. I mean, the Trump family in New York, and The Apprentice show, you guys were doing great things for the city, the city loved you. You saved the roller rink, you did a number of great things. How surprising was this total turn to outright hatred for you and your family once your father’s political career got in gear?

TRUMP JR.: Again, not entirely surprising. You know, but that’s sort of the evolution of the Democrat Party. And I say that because, again, I’m from New York City, I get it. I have plenty of friends that were Democrats. But even they and many of them today have a hard time arguing the Democrat platform and I think that’s the point I make throughout the country and in the book, which is today’s Democrat Party is not your grandfather’s Democrat Party.

The example I use is Kimberly convinced me to take her to this restaurant on Valentine’s Day on the Upper East Side of New York, and this is not exactly a conservative stronghold, as you’re aware.

RUSH: Oh, yeah, yeah, been there numerous times when they wouldn’t let me in.

TRUMP JR.: Yes, exactly. And so I’m sitting there and I’m going, “Oh, no.” Everyone’s giving me side eye and I’m looking, “Who am I gonna have to take a swing at to defend my girlfriend here?” And we have this dinner and I’m sort of annoyed about the whole thing throughout the thing. And we pay our check, we get out, we leave, and this old lady comes up and she says, “You!” out loud, I mean, it’s small restaurant. I’m like, “Oh, boy, here we go.” It’s a little harder to punch an old lady, right? I’m just kidding. I’m just kidding, Rush.

Push backI’m saying, “Oh, no here we go. This is why I didn’t even want to go out.” And she just goes, “You guys have the biggest –” you know, there’s a word, maybe not for radio, but it starts with a B and ends in an S. “And I love it. You guys fight, you don’t give in,” and she’s screaming this at this restaurant. And so everyone all of the sudden is looking, and I thought everyone was giving me side eye, and literally Rush, everyone stood up and started clapping.

They came over and started shaking hands and giving me selfies. So in this bastion of liberalism, this place where, you know, 2% of the people are conservatives and I thought everyone was hating on me, there was actually a lot of love. But they just didn’t know how to react. They were so —

RUSH: No, everybody thought they were the only ones in the room that did and didn’t want to —

TRUMP JR.: Correct. (crosstalk)

RUSH: — so once that old lady got the gonads up and went up and do it, that cleared the way for everybody else to tell you how much they love you.

TRUMP JR.: One hundred percent.

Donald Trump Jr. Calls the Show