Judeo-Christian Culture vs. Interfaith Alliance, Muslim Brotherhood

Judeo-Christian Culture vs. Interfaith Alliance, Muslim Brotherhood

Alliance of Virtue: Common good – or grand deception?

 

 Ominously, many pastors and imams in the Muslim Brotherhood-led Alliance of Virtue movement are pointing their fingers at Bible-believing evangelicals – who also happen to support the Trump administration – and their heightened awareness of civilization jihad.

J.M. Phelps and Philip B. Haney

 

To some Christians, the AoV movement may be a glorious vision of interfaith harmony and dialogue. In reality, it’s a movement defined not by biblical values but on the values and teachings derived from the Quran, Hadith, and traditions of Islam.

 

Islamist Quran Beliefs, Sharia Law are  Diametrically Opposed to US Constitution

 The Alliance of Virtue for Common Good (AoV) is considered by Islamic scholars to be a 1,400-year old Muslim-led initiative, which they believe began in 622 with the transcription of Prophet Mohammad’s Constitution of Medina, also known as the Medina Charter. According to these scholars, the Constitution of Medina was not only the first constitution in human history, but also serves as the true foundation that all subsequent constitutions are built upon – including the U.S. Constitution.

 

“Common Word” Connections to Muslim Brotherhood

The original 140 signatories of the Common Word include many notable Muslim Brotherhood-affiliated sheikhs and imams. Today, there are more than 280 Christian signatories and an additional 460 individuals and organizations that have endorsed the Common Word document.

The term “Common Word” is derived directly from Quran 3.64, which states:

Say: ‘O People of the Book! Come now to a common word between us and you, that we serve none but Allah, and that we associate not aught with Him, and do not some of us take others as Lords, apart from Allah.’  And if they turn their backs, say: ‘Bear witness that we are Muslims [submitting to Him].’

This background information is important, because the Alliance of Virtue is built on the foundation of the Muslim Brotherhood-linked “A Common Word.”

Eight years after the “A Common Word” document was first introduced (in 2007), an Islamic conference entitled “Reviving the Islamic Spirit” was held on December 23, 2015, in Toronto, Canada. This appears to be the first time the Alliance of Virtue concept was introduced to the West.

The February 7, 2018, event concluded with the signing of the Washington Declaration. As stated in the Declaration:

“More than 400 representatives from the three Abrahamic faiths assembled in the spirit of another initiative that came to fruition on the Arabian Peninsula in the seventh century of the Common Era. The Alliance of Virtue was formed in Mecca, and included in its embrace the Prophet Mohammad, prior to his mission, and leaders from a variety of ethnicities and religions. The Alliance was conceived and implemented to support the rule of law and to ensure fair treatment for the vulnerable and disadvantaged throughout the Meccan community.”

In describing the attitude of those attending the AoV conference in Washington, a reporter for the Religion News Service (RNS) stated: “The presence of so many evangelicals, a group often associated with a negative view of Islam, provided a welcome backdrop for an event aimed at championing tolerance.”

In any large movement like this, there tends to be an “other” – an opposition party or people who oppose the noble goals of this glorious vision of interfaith harmony and dialogue. Ominously, many pastors and imams in the Muslim Brotherhood-led Alliance of Virtue movement are pointing their fingers at Bible-believing evangelicals – who also happen to support the Trump administration – and their heightened awareness of civilization jihad.

 

Alliance of Virtue: Common good – or grand deception?

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