Biblical Worldview: Bible History supports Border Security

Biblical Worldview:

Bible History supports Border Security

The Bible: The U.S. Has Every Right to Shut Down Its Border

Bryan Fischer

American Family Association

The Daily Stand

Reading the Bible you will find that national borders are to be recognized and respected.

Regressive evangelicals can be fooled just like anyone when it comes to what the Bible teaches about illegal immigration. To hear many evangelical leaders tell it, God is all for open borders and anybody who thinks otherwise is a bad Christian. But that’s not what we discover when we take a closer look at what the Bible actually says rather than what we want it to say.

Congress refuses to address hopelessly outdated immigration policies that require illegals be released into the interior of the United States as soon as they are apprehended, in the vain hope that they will return for an asylum hearing one day, years in the future. Things are so bad that the governor of New Mexico loaded up a caravan of illegal aliens herself and dumped them in Colorado.

Deprived of every other option by a spineless Congress and a tyrannical judiciary, the president has resorted to the use of tariffs to get Mexico’s attention. What the president has realized is that there is simply no way to control illegal immigration without making it Mexico’s problem instead of ours.

At this point, the U.S. is carrying all the burden and Mexico is reaping all the benefits. Some of those we take in are the dregs of their society. We feed them, house them, clothe them, and educate them though they pay no taxes. At the same time, the remittances they send back to Mexico comprise the biggest single component of the Mexican economy, surpassing even oil revenue. The entire state of affairs is intolerable and unsustainable.

border wallRegressive evangelicals can be fooled just like anyone when it comes to what the Bible teaches about illegal immigration. To hear many evangelical leaders tell it, God is all for open borders and anybody who thinks otherwise is a bad Christian.

But that’s not what we discover when we take a closer look at what the Bible actually says rather than what we want it to say. When Israel approached the Promised Land in its journey through the wilderness, Moses asked the kings of Edom and Moab for permission to pass through their territory on the way to Canaan and was denied – twice.

The king of Edom “would not listen” and the king of Moab “would not consent” (Judges 11:17). What did Moses do? Did he invade their land or sneak across their borders?

NO – the Bible says in Judges 11:18 he “went around the land of Moab and the land of Edom.”  In other words, he honored their borders and would not enter their sovereign territory without their permission. 

The Bible teaches us here and in any many other places that borders around countries are God’s idea, not man’s, and must be respected. When we protect our sovereign borders from an invasion of illegal aliens who enter without our permission, we are simply following the template laid down by God himself in his Word.

There is nothing wrong and everything right about insisting that the people of other nations honor and respect our borders. And the sooner we do it the better.

 

The Bible: The U.S. Has Every Right to Shut Down Its Border

 

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Capitalism Explained: Adam Smith Capitalism Benefits vs. Command and Control Economy, Socialism Failure

Capitalism Explained:

Adam Smith Capitalism Benefits vs. Command and Control Economy, Socialism Failure

Dinner Topics for Tuesday

key“Under capitalism everybody provides for their own needs by serving the needs of others.” ~Ludwig von Mises

Adam Smith Wealth of Nations

Free Market: Essence of Prosperity

Capitalism explained. The Trump economy today shows that capitalism works. When businesses are free to profit, they can create more jobs, feed more people. The more they meet people’s needs, the more they profit, and the wealth spreads to more and more people. It’s as simple as that.

C.A. Davidson

handshake“Nobody ever saw a dog make a fair and deliberate exchange of one bone for another with another dog. But man has almost constant occasion for the help of his brethren, and it is vain for him to expect it from their benevolence only.”

“Give me that which I want, and you shall have this which you want.”

“It is not from the benevolence of the butcher, the brewer, or the baker that we expect our dinner, but from their regard to their own interest. We … never talk to them of our own necessities but of their advantages.” ~Adam Smith

 

Command and Control Economy explained.

Some big businesses get in bed with government. Government officials enrich themselves by decreeing regulations that protect big business monopolies and break small businesses. This is not capitalism. It is an economy under Command and Control of the government. It only thrives on corruption.

deep stateGovernment unelected bureaucrats often rage about the “selfishness” of businesses, but the most successful businesses please the most consumers. This is clearly unselfish.

When some businesses do not meet the needs of consumers, they fail. If they break the law against robbery and fraud, they are punished.

But what happens when government takes over business and fails to meet consumer needs? Who punishes government for breaking laws, for engaging in robbery and fraud?

Too many politicians have taken to enforcing Political Correctness instead of the law. Rather than encouraging free trade and spreading prosperity, the result is stifling honest, wholesome, and necessary businesses.

To the extent that governments restrict businesses in their free exchange of goods and services by eliminating competition, it is government which creates monopolies, reduces the selection and quality of goods, reduces gainful employment, and spreads poverty.

 

 History timeline: Revisiting History

 

1776— 

The Wealth of Nations was also an argument against government control. England at the time had chartered monopolies back in 1776. The king decided what companies would do what.” ~Rush Limbaugh

1930s and 1940s—

Another word for “crony capitalism” is fascism. This was the brand of socialism practiced by Hitler and Mussolini. They invested government money (from taxpayers) into their chosen industries.

2012

Over the years big government has favored certain industries. During the Obama era, a type of fascism was practiced in that the Obama administration favored so-called “green” industries, which were economically unsound, and failed, at the taxpayers’ expense.

 

2019

The Trump economy is booming, due to de-regulating businesses, who in turn hire more people, creating more jobs, and raising the average wage. In a word, Prosperity.

On a global scale, Trump is restoring the trade balance, instead of allowing the US to finance other nations, without other nations during their fair share. When the US prospers, other nations prosper as well. There is less poverty in the world today than ever before.

 Dinner Talk

Analysis and critical thinking skills: how to discern and evaluate economic principles

  • Read and compare capitalism vs. command and control economy in the above essay.
  •  What do you think is the difference between selfishness and self-interest? Why do you think the Constitution shows that the Founders understood human nature?
  • (That’s why there’s a difference in “selfishness” and “self-interest,” but everybody looking out for themselves — not in a selfish way, but in a self-interest way — benefits everybody else. The guy behind the counter selling a television set, he’s gotta make sure there’s a lot of them there to handle the demand. He’s gotta make an investment in having a stockroom full of the things that people might want. He’s gotta take a risk in how many to buy and what kind, based on the best evidence he has of what people are gonna want and what they’re willing to pay. ~Rush Limbaugh)

 

 

Adam Smith and the Wealth of Nations

*From Wikipedia

capitalismAdam Smith (baptised 16 June 1723 – 17 July 1790 [OS: 5 June 1723 – 17 July 1790]) was a Scottish social philosopher and a pioneer of political economy. One of the key figures of the Scottish Enlightenment,[1] Smith is the author of The Principles Which Lead and Direct Philosophical Enquiries, Illustrated by the History of Astronomy, prior to 1758, The Theory of Moral Sentiments, 1759, and An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations, 1776. The latter, usually abbreviated as The Wealth of Nations, is considered his magnum opus and the first modern work of economics. It earned him an enormous reputation and would become one of the most influential works ever published. Smith is widely cited as the father of modern economics and capitalism and is still among the most influential thinkers in the field of economics today.[2] In 2009, Smith was named among the ‘Greatest Scots’ of all time, in a vote run by Scottish television channel STV.[3]

Smith studied social philosophy at the University of Glasgow and at Balliol College in the University of Oxford, where he was one of the first students to benefit from scholarships set up by his fellow Glaswegian John Snell. After graduating, he delivered a successful series of public lectures at Edinburgh, leading him to collaborate with David Hume during the Scottish Enlightenment. Smith obtained a professorship at Glasgow teaching moral philosophy, and during this time he wrote and published The Theory of Moral Sentiments. In his later life, he took a tutoring position that allowed him to travel throughout Europe, where he met other intellectual leaders of his day. Smith then returned home and spent the next ten years writing The Wealth of Nations, publishing it in 1776. He died in 1790 at the age of 67.

The Wealth of Nations

Main article: The Wealth of Nations

AdamSmith1790bSmith used the term “the invisible hand” in “History of Astronomy”[76] referring to “the invisible hand of Jupiter” and twice – each time with a different meaning – the term “an invisible hand“: in The Theory of Moral Sentiments[77] (1759) and in The Wealth of Nations[78] (1776). This last statement about “an invisible hand” has been interpreted as “the invisible hand” in numerous ways. It is therefore important to read the original:

As every individual, therefore, endeavours as much as he can both to employ his capital in the support of domestic industry, and so to direct that industry that its produce may be of the greatest value; every individual necessarily labours to render the annual revenue of the society as great as he can. He generally, indeed, neither intends to promote the public interest, nor knows how much he is promoting it. By preferring the support of domestic to that of foreign industry, he intends only his own security; and by directing that industry in such a manner as its produce may be of the greatest value, he intends only his own gain, and he is in this, as in many other eases, led by an invisible hand to promote an end which was no part of his intention. Nor is it always the worse for the society that it was no part of it. By pursuing his own interest he frequently promotes that of the society more effectually than when he really intends to promote it. I have never known much good done by those who affected to trade for the public good. [emphasis added].

Those who regard that statement as Smith’s central message also quote frequently Smith’s dictum:[79]

It is not from the benevolence of the butcher, the brewer, or the baker, that we expect our dinner, but from their regard to their own interest. We address ourselves, not to their humanity but to their self-love, and never talk to them of our own necessities but of their advantages.

Smith’s statement about the benefits of “an invisible hand” is certainly meant to answer Mandeville’s contention that “Private Vices … may be turned into Public Benefits”.[80] It shows Smith’s belief that when an individual pursues his self-interest, he indirectly promotes the good of society. Self-interested competition in the free market, he argued, would tend to benefit society as a whole by keeping prices low, while still building in an incentive for a wide variety of goods and services. Nevertheless, he was wary of businessmen and warned of their “conspiracy against the public or in some other contrivance to raise prices.”[81] Again and again, Smith warned of the collusive nature of business interests, which may form cabals or monopolies, fixing the highest price “which can be squeezed out of the buyers”.[82] Smith also warned that a true laissez-faire economy would quickly become a conspiracy of businesses and industry against consumers, with the former scheming to influence politics and legislation. Smith states that the interest of manufacturers and merchants “…in any particular branch of trade or manufactures, is always in some respects different from, and even opposite to, that of the public…

 

Truth in Journalism: Trump visit to UK trumps Mainstream Media Censorship, Fake News activities

Truth in Journalism:

Trump visit to UK trumps Mainstream Media Censorship, Fake News activities

Critical thinking skills.This is good training in discerning truth from deception. The mainstream media is totally debunked as a reliable news source. ~C.A. Davidson

Great Week for Trump, Bad Week for Drive-By Media

RUSH: Despite the best efforts of CNN, New York Times, the Washington Post to portray this as something it wasn’t, the queen was utterly charmed by Donald Trump.

Fake News: The Protests that didn’t happen

June 3, 2019

Trump UK visit

Trump UK visit

RUSH: All right. So here, it’s everything, it’s Fox News, PMS, NBC, CNN, they’re all breathlessly waiting. So somebody told ’em that massive protests are scheduled. If massive protests are scheduled, they can’t be spontaneous. They’ve gotta be bought, paid for, and planned.

They all bought it, they all believed it, they all assumed it was gonna happen, and then today came, and there weren’t any. There were zilch, zero, nada. There weren’t any protests. Nobody showed up! And we have a random act of journalism on CNN. They actually told the truth about it. Some reporter named Nick Patton Walsh.

 

Trump-UK-Queen

Trump-UK-Queen

RUSH: Now, Donald Trump in the United Kingdom.  Big, big mistake. Now we found that… Remember the story we had…? I think it was Monday. This is Wednesday, so it was Monday.

The media has been working overtime to manufacture a spat and a disagreement and a state of dislike between the queen and Donald Trump. And while doing that, they were holding out hope and promoting and warning everybody about massive anti-Trump protests that didn’t happen — and the queen loves Trump! You can see it in the pictures. The queen is charmed by the president and actually asked him to come back to our country as soon as you can, on his departure. You can see it in all the pictures.

Pres. Trump, Melania, Queen Elizabeth, UK

Pres. Trump, Melania, Queen Elizabeth, UK

Despite the best efforts of CNN, New York Times, the Washington Post to portray this as something it wasn’t, the queen was utterly charmed by Donald Trump. Melania Trump was an absolute star on this trip. And the photos of her and the president chatting… There was a dinner. I guess they hosted a dinner last night for Prince Charles and the Duchess of “Cornwallis,” whatever, Camilla, and are waiting for ’em to show up.

And Trump and Melania are standing there like a married couple of many years chatting and laughing with each other and winking and nodding and so forth. It was utterly a completely different picture than what you get from the Drive-By Media. (impression) “Melania can’t wait to get out! Melania’s so embarrassed! Melania worries about her young son growing up with such an ogre.” None of this is true.

The British press, as I say, totally flipped and wrote a bunch of positive stuff about this trip.

d day pointe du hoc

DDayPointe-du-Hoc Normandy Beach

RUSH: Yeah. Here it is right here in the U.K. Daily Mail: “‘I hope you come to this country again soon:’ What the Queen told Donald Trump at the end of his state visit as he bid fond farewell to Britain following moving ceremony to salute the heroes of D-Day” 75 years ago. D-Day. You wonder how many young people know about it, what it really was, why it was important. Is it taught anymore?

I’ve been over there twice. I’ve been to the Normandy beaches twice. I’ve been to the cemetery. I’ve been to Pointe du Hoc in France. You see where it happened — and if you have enough information about what happened, it cannot help but move you. The first time I was there was the 50th anniversary. I was there the week after they celebrated it, 25 years ago. It was a moving, moving ceremony that they had. There were even some people still alive who had participated in it, and they were able to participate in the ceremony.

Obama’s gift to the Queen

Do you remember what Obama gave the queen? Let me tell you. He gave the queen an iPod with his speeches recorded on it. Now, we don’t know what the queen — we never saw a public reaction. I will guarantee you — well, I can’t guarantee you, but the odds are the queen laughed and looked at the that iPod, said, “Who does this guy think he is?” Because the queen knew that Obama had no love lost for the Brits. The Brits were colonialists, Obama hated colonialists. And I think the gift of a bunch of speeches was really a diss, in a way. He knew she wasn’t gonna listen to his words. But if she did, I guarantee you the first speeches on there would have been what Obama thought of the Brits. Remember the story about removing the bust of Winston Churchill out of the Oval Office? That story went back and forth, true, false. It did get moved. Not out of the White House, but it was moved out of the Oval Office after Obama was inaugurated.

 

Trump’s Gift to the Queen. . . Memorializes D-Day and World War I

 

RUSH: Let me tell you something about the queen. People have forgotten. Let me interrupt you here. Do you guys remember Trump gave the queen a tremendous gift.

“Trump gave the queen a silver and silk poppy brooch from Tiffany & Co. in a custom wood White House jewelry box…

“The poppy symbolizes remembrance for those who died in World War I, though the White House could have chosen the gift for the 75th anniversary of D-Day on Thursday.” He may have had

trump uk visit

Pres. Trump, Queen Elizabeth, UK

done it for that reason which, as you know, is tomorrow. “Prince Philip,” the husband of the queen — who is not doing well, folks. These people have remarkable longevity, but nevertheless, Prince Philip is not doing well. “Prince Philip received a personalized Air Force One jacket as well as a first-edition, signed copy of World War II aviator James Doolittle’s autobiography, I Could Never Be So Lucky Again.

“The gifts pointed to the fact that Prince Philip was a pilot and served in World War II, according to Town & Country. According to [Town & Country magazine], these official gift exchanges require consultation with the State Department. The first lady’s spokeswoman Stephanie Grisham told CNN Melania Trump was ‘very involved with the gift selection,’ alongside the State Department.” So I wanted to get all of that straight. 

Great Week for Trump, Bad Week for Drive-By Media

Two Polls That Are Good News for Trump

RUSH: “Americans View Fake News as a Bigger Problem Than Terrorism.” Holy smokes!

  • This has been a very bad week — and it’s only Wednesday — for the Drive-By Media worldwide. Remember the story about the dead North Korean officials that were executed? They’re walking around. They’re alive. They are above ground. As we say on the golf course, “They’re on the right side of the grass.”

Social Media Abuse of Power

  • The African-American forklift operator who put together the satirical video of Pelosi appearing to slur her words? And we were told that an enterprising journalist called Facebook and ferreted out the truth, and Facebook just divulged (because the reporter wanted to know) the name of the person that did it. It turns out that the media used convicted felons to dox this guy. We were not told the truth about how his identity was learned.

RUSH: There’s a new poll out, a CNN poll. They are not happy reporting this poll. The upshot of the CNN poll is more than two-thirds of the American people are happy with the economy. (impression) “That… that… that… that…” They got a problem. They’ve got to do something about that at CNN. They’ve been trying to do something about that and they’re obviously failing. Two-thirds happy with the economy.

 

And then here is a story from the Millennial website called Axios, and this headline is a big win for Trump. It’s a poll from the Pew Research Center. “Americans View Fake News as a Bigger Problem Than Terrorism.”

Two Polls That Are Good News for Trump

D Day Meaning: D Day invasion in Normandy is about Survival of Western Civilization

D Day Meaning:

D Day invasion in Normandy is about Survival of Western Civilization

President Trump’s Moving Speech at Normandy

Jun 6, 2019

RUSH: If you didn’t hear President Trump’s speech at Normandy today because of the time difference, you really need to.

THE PRESIDENT: We are gathered here on freedom’s altar. On these shores, on these bluffs, on this day 75 years ago, 10,000 men shed their blood and thousands sacrificed their lives for their brothers, for their countries, and for the survival of liberty. Today we remember those who fell, and we honor all who fought right here in Normandy. They won back this ground for civilization. To more than 170 veterans of the Second World War who join us today, you are among the very greatest Americans who will ever live. You are the pride of our nation, you are the glory of our republic, and we thank you from the bottom of our hearts.

In the early morning hours, the two brothers stood together on the deck of the USS Henrico before boarding two separate Higgins landing craft. “If I don’t make it,” Bill said, “please, please take care of my family.” Ray asked his brother to do the same. Of the 31 men on Ray’s landing craft, only Ray and six others made it to the beach. There were only a few of them left. Again and again, Ray ran back into the water.

He dragged out one man after another. He was shot through the arm. His leg was ripped open by shrapnel. His back was broken. He nearly drowned. He woke up the next day on a cot beside another badly wounded soldier. He looked over and saw his brother, Bill. They made it! They made it! They made it!

At 98 years old, Ray is here with us today with his fourth Purple Heart and his third Silver Star from Omaha.THE PRESIDENT: Ray, the Free World salutes you.

Private First Class Russell Pickett of the 29th Division’s famed 116th Infantry Regiment had been wounded in the first wave that landed on Omaha Beach. At a hospital in England, Private Pickett vowed to return to battle. Six days after D-Day, he rejoined his company. Before long, a grenade left Private Pickett and he was gravely wounded — so badly wounded. Again, he chose to return. He didn’t care. He had to be here. He was then wounded a third time and laid conscience for 12 days. They thought he was gone. They had he had no chance. Russell Pickett is the last known survivor of the legendary Company A. And today, believe it or not, he has returned once more to these shores to be with his comrades.

CROWD: (applause)

THE PRESIDENT: Private Pickett you honor us all with your presence.

To all of our friends and partners, our cherished alliance was forged in the heat of battle, tested in the trials of war, and proven in the blessings of peace. Our bond is unbreakable. From across the earth Americans are drawn to this place as though it were a part of our very soul. We come not only because of what they did here, we come because of who they were.

They were young men with their entire lives before them. They were husbands who said good-bye to their young brides and took their duty as their fate. There were fathers who would never meet their infant sons and daughters ’cause they had a job to do. And with God as their witness, they were going to get it done. More powerful than the strength of American arms was the strength of American hearts.

These men ran through the fires of hell, moved by a force no weapon could destroy: the fierce patriotism of a free, proud, and sovereign people. They battled not for control and domination, but for liberty, democracy, and self-rule. They were sustained by the confidence that America can do anything because we are a noble nation with a virtuous people, praying to a righteous God. The exceptional might came from a truly exceptional spirit.

To the men who sit behind me and to the boys who rest in the field before me, your example will never, ever grow old.

CROWD: (applause)

THE PRESIDENT: Your legend will never die. Your spirit, brave, unyielding, and true, will never die. The blood that they spilled, the tears that they shed, the lives that they gave, the sacrifice that they made did not just win a battle. It did not just win a war. Those who fought here won a future for our nation.

They won the Survival of Western Civilization

They won the survival of our civilization, and they showed us the way to love, cherish, and defend our way of life for many centuries to come. Today as we stand together upon this sacred earth, we pledge that our nation will forever be strong and united. We will forever be together.

Our people will forever be bold. Our hearts will forever be loyal. And our children and their children will forever and always be free. May God bless our great veterans. May God bless our allies. May God bless the heroes of D-Day. And may God bless America. Thank you. Thank you very much.

Obama’s Speech

RUSH: That was Andrea Mitchell (NBC News, Washington) saying, of course, “This was not Donald Trump speaking…” Christiane Amanpour: “Absolutely perfect speech.” John Berman at CNN: “It wasn’t a speech about him.” “He really rose to the occasion. He stuck to the script,” blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. Again, how striking it is that these people will never understand Trump.

Trump makes everything about him in his speeches? Let me show you somebody who did that all the time. Audio sound bite number 3.

December 10th, 2019, Oslo. This is Barack Obama receiving the Nobel Peace Prize for having done nothing. He’d only been in office two months when he got the Nobel Peace Prize! They gave him the Nobel Peace Prize on the come, because they said he wanted peace.

 What they really knew was that Obama was gonna downsize the United States. Obama was gonna rein in the power of the United States. Why give somebody the peace prize who hasn’t done diddly-squat yet? So here is Obama, December 10, 2009, accepting his Nobel Peace Prize…

OBAMA (montage):

 I receive this honor yet because I am I cannot deny I am I’m a responsible and so I come I do not bring what I do know I make I am living I know there’s nothing weak I cannot I face the world I raise this point I believe I like any I am convinced I believe I understand but I also know I believe that is why II ordered why I have reaffirmed I have spoken I believe I am committed I’m working I believe I know that but I also note I do not I refuse I refuse to accept the idea I reject these choices.

RUSH: We didn’t repeat one of those. By the way, it didn’t take long before the Nobel committee was being told, “You know, you need to pull that prize back. This guy’s is the biggest warmonger we’ve seen in a long time.” The United States was in war every day of this guy’s administration — and when it came to drone kills, Obama practically flew the drones. He had a kill list! Obama demanded to have the kill list run by him every day. He determined who died via the drone strikes in the Middle East.

 

President Trump’s Moving Speech at Normandy

 

Understanding the Enormity of D-Day

Millennials’ Ignorance of History; do not appreciate D Day Meaning

Jun 6, 2019

You talk about the Gen X today, the Gen Z, and the Millennials… What happened in the 1940s and World War II is incomprehensible to them, and it’s ancient history and irrelevant to a lot of them.

RUSH: There’s a reason the people who did all this are called the Greatest Generation. Because this wasn’t the only challenge they faced.

You talk about the Gen X today, the Gen Z, and the Millennials… What happened in the 1940s and World War II is incomprehensible to them, and it’s ancient history and irrelevant to a lot of them. And it will never happen again. That kind of warfare can never happen again. There were no satellite photographs, there were no satellites, period, in the 1940s. There was no way. There were no precision-guided bombs. There was no technology whatsoever. The Germans had this code machine called the Enigma. It took years to decipher it. We had our own coding system. But warfare that requires massive numbers of human beings to storm beaches and climb cliffs with rifles and shotguns, those days are forever gone.

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, you remember when she announced her Green New Deal? She said that the issue of climate change was her generation’s World War II. Okay, let’s synthesize that. D-Day. D-Day is symbolic with winning World War II; so she claims that the Green New Deal is her generation’s D-Day.

It’s not relevant to this, except that she came out yesterday and made a similar claim that climate change is this generation’s D-Day. Now, this is ludicrous. It’s childish silliness. Anybody with any sense, any knowledge of history at all would have to scoff at this comparison. (impression) “Climate change is the equivalent of D-Day today, that’s the big challenge, we’ve gotta storm the beaches at Normandy to save not just America now, but to save the planet.” And it’s what I alluded to earlier. We Baby Boomers, we’ve had to invent our traumas to tell ourselves our lives have meaning and that we had challenges to overcome.

And the Millennials are doing the same thing, people desperate to find meaning in their lives. Ocasio-Cortez epitomizes this. Her life, the lives of Millennials. So equating something this historical and monumental, the significance of winning World War II to the weather, to the climate, is absurd. But I think we may be facing, nevertheless, a World War II-like situation today. It just doesn’t have anything to do with the weather.

The D-Day 75 Anniversary – Freedom Isn’t Free”. Political Cartoon by A.F. Branco ©2019.

See more Conservative Daily News cartoons here

 

The World War II Challenge We Face

Constitution Series 18: Rights from God protected by Constitution, Records of History

Constitution Series 18:

Rights from God protected by Constitution, Records of History

Founding Principles of America:

28 Great Ideas that changed the world

5000leapThe practical application of this book review of Skousen educated wisdom is to leverage “We, The People’s” knowledge to easily expose ignorance, anarchy and tyranny, and hold the government accountable.

From The 5,000 Year Leap—A Miracle that Changed the World

By W. Cleon Skousen

US Constitution Series 18

Our Unalienable Rights from God are Best Protected by Written Records of History

keyoldThey had had many wars and serious contentions, and had fallen by the sword from time to time; and their language had become corrupted; and they had brought no records with them; and they denied the being of their Creator. ~Omni 1:17

 

No written records, no history

The one weakness of the Anglo-Saxon common law was that it was unwritten. Since its principles were known among the whole people, they seemed indifferent to the necessity of writing them down.

“Until the Anglo-Saxon conversion to Christianity it was unwritten and like all customary law was considered immutable. “ (Lovell, English Constitutional and Legal History, 7)

magna-cartaHowever, the Norman Conquest taught the Anglo-Saxons in England a bitter lesson. Many of their most treasured rights disappeared in a flood of blood and vindictive oppression. In fact, these rights were retained very slowly over a period of centuries and gradually they were written down. In A.D. 1215, during a national crisis, the sword was virtually put to the throat of King John in order to compel him to sign the Magna Charta, setting forth the traditional rights of freemen.

During that same century the “Model Parliament” came into being, which compelled the King to acknowledge the principle of no taxation without representation.

Through the centuries, the British have tried to manage their political affairs with no written constitution and have merely relied upon these fragmentary statures as a constitutional reference source. These proved helpful to the American Founders, but they felt that the structure of government should be codified in a more permanent, comprehensive form.

It will be appreciated, therefore, that the tradition of written constitutions in modern times is not of English origin but is entirely American, both in principle and practice.

Mayflower-compact-hero2-ABeginnings of a Written Constitution in America

The first written charter in America was in 1620, when the Mayflower Compact came into being. Later the charter concept evolved into a more comprehensive type of constitution when Thomas Hooker and his associates adopted the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut in 1639. It is interesting that the Connecticut charter makes no reference to the Crown or the British Government as the source of its authority. (Skousen, 217-218)

American Constitution Represents Wisdom of Many

signers3Montesquieu pointed out that when it comes to legislating (which includes the setting up of constitutions), the writing of the statute or charter is “oftentimes better regulated by many than by a single person.” In harmony with this same sentiment, the American Founding Fathers considered it wise to “legislate” their constitution by filtering it through the wisdom and experiences of many delegates assembled in a convention rather than leaving it to the genius of some individual.

It is always difficult to operate through a committee, a group, or a convention as the Founding Fathers did. Nevertheless, the history of the convention demonstrates that the final product was far stronger than any individual could have written it. Time has also proven the tremendous advantage of having a completely written document for reference purposes rather than relying upon tradition and a few scattered statutes as the fundamental law of the land. (Skousen 220-221)

Why Young Adults need to know about Judeo-Christian Heritage and Freedom of Religion

NEXT—

Principle 19: Only Limited Powers should be delegated to Government; all others being Retained in the People

 

 

History Facts: Remembering the War Heroes of D-Day Invasion

History Facts:

Remembering the War Heroes of D-Day Invasion

O’Donnell: Beyond Valor: Rangers Lead the Way on D-Day

That was far from the last time the Rangers would meet Germans face-to-face. The elite American forces led the way across Europe, their sacrifices ensuring that freedom and democracy would continue to thrive, as they do to this day.

Patrick K. O’Donnell

“We were about two hundred feet from the beach when a shell blew off the front of our landing craft, destroying the ramp,” recalled Ray Alm from B Company of the 2nd Ranger Battalion, which landed on Omaha’s deadly Dog Green Beach at approximately 7:40 a.m. on D-Day. “My two best buddies were right in front of me, and they were both killed. I was holding a .45 pistol and carrying a bazooka with eight shells; it was so heavy that I just went right under the water. So I had to let everything go except the shells.”

He continued, “When we were on the beach, there were two other Rangers and myself running, and a German machine gun was firing at us. We hid behind an anti-tank obstacle. The three of us ducked behind it. We then headed towards the front again. It was terrible; there were bodies all over the place. They wiped out almost the entire 116th Infantry Regiment; they just murdered them. They were floating all over the place, there was blood in the water—it was just dark.”

This June 6 marks the 73rd anniversary of D-Day. Nothing captures the drama and action of that day better than the words of the men who actually took part in the assault. Particularly poignant are the voices of the elite Army Rangers who led the way off bloody Omaha Beach.

Sadly, most of the men who remember that day have passed on. But their voices are immortalized in Beyond Valor: World War II’s Ranger and Airborne Veterans Reveal the Heart of Combat. For nearly twenty-five years, I’ve been interviewing American veterans from WWI to Iraq, and I have captured more than 4,000 oral histories from WWII veterans in elite units such as the Rangers. These men were my friends, men my daughter called uncle. In many cases, these great Americans did the impossible. Their individual actions changed history, and they did their duty in the face of tremendous odds.

On the morning of D-Day, members of the 5th and 2nd Ranger Battalions were making their way through the choppy waters off Normandy to their D-Day objectives. They were divided into three different groups, each focused on specific military targets. Their primary focus was the guns of Pointe du Hoc and the deadly German mortars on the high ground to the extreme left of Omaha.

For the bulk of the Rangers, including the 5th Battalion, their secondary objective if Pointe du Hoc failed was Omaha Beach. Faulty radar and failed radio transmissions led to a chain of events that put the 5th and several companies of the 2nd Rangers on their secondary objective: Omaha. At the right place, at exactly the right time, they led a crucial breakout.

Here are two of their stories:

“We went up on toeholds and by digging our fingernails and bayonets into the ninety foot cliff. . . . When we got up on top we had only nine men left in my platoon,” recalled my dear friend Lt. Sid Salomon.

Salomon was one of the first Rangers on the beach. C Company of the 2nd Ranger Battalion landed at 0645. Dodging mortar and machine-gun fire, the men scaled ninety-foot cliffs of Pointe-et-Raz-de-la-Percée. Under fire, the Rangers made it to the top and attacked the Germans in an effort to deny them crucial high ground over the Charlie sector of Omaha Beach.

“We had two platoons, each in its own landing craft,” Salomon said. “I was in charge of one, and the other platoon leader was in charge of the other. Our goal was to cross the beach, climb the cliff, and neutralize the mortars and machine guns that were positioned on top of a beach that intelligence had indicated could threaten the landing at Omaha Beach.”

The fight began even before the Rangers reached the shore. “The trip was tough coming in,” Solomon said. “Keep in mind, it was postponed due to rough seas. The men started getting sick. We were issued paper bags, like you get in airplanes. The men filled them up and threw them over the side. Some men started using their helmets. We could hear the ping of the machine gun bullets hitting the side of the landing craft, and mortar shells were landing near the landing craft. I could see the concentric circles formed by the shells hitting the water. It was quite something, of course. One of the men joked, ‘Hey, they’re firing at us.’ It added a little humor to the situation.”

When the landing craft hit the beach, Solomon was the first to exit the vessel. “When I jumped off, I held my tommy gun over my head. I jumped into not-quite-chest-high water, and it took a few seconds to get my feet on the ground. In the meantime, the second man, Sergeant Reed, jumped off to the left. I always figured that the first man out would be hit. Fortunately, the Germans didn’t know when the ramp would lower. But they had us zeroed in with their machine guns, and the second man, Reed, was hit. He had fallen down, wounded, and had slid underneath the ramp.”

Solomon dragged Reed to the water’s edge and told him, “Sergeant, this is as far as I can take you, I have to get along.”

Then he took off running. “A mortar shell landed right behind me and killed or wounded all of my mortar section. I got some of the shrapnel—it hit my back and I landed right on my face. I fell down in the sand and thought I was dead.” Solomon remembered.

But he refused to give up. “Right then and there, I said to myself that I wasn’t going to die. This was no place to be lying, so I took my maps, I got up, and ran toward the overhang of the cliff,” he recalled.

“An aid man came over to me and took my field jacket and shirt off and started digging shrapnel out of my back. These were the days before penicillin, and each man carried a sulfa pack, and he put it on my back.” The medic told him. “That’s all I can do for you now.”

Despite the pain, Solomon began to climb the ninety-foot cliff. “Each man had a six-foot piece of rope that had a noose at the end of it and, ideally, we were to link the ropes together and scale the cliff,” he explained. “We didn’t bother with that since, of course, so many men had gotten killed and wounded. . . . We went up on toeholds and by digging our fingernails and bayonets into the cliff.”

But of the 37 men in the company, only nine would survive the climb.

Those nine had overcome tremendous odds, but the fighting — and the dying — weren’t finished yet. Salomon and a fellow platoon leader lay in a shellhole from where they could see the German trench they next needed to assault. “We were there only a minute or two and all of a sudden Bill Moody, the 1st Platoon commander, fell over on my shoulder. He had been killed by a bullet hole through his eyes,” Salomon recalled.

Without pausing to mourn, Salomon grabbed another of the Rangers who had made it to the top and said, “Let’s go!” They ran and jumped into the trench, following it until they came to a dugout. “I threw a white phosphorous grenade through the entrance and waited a minute,” Salomon explained. “We then sprayed the entrance.” With no one inside, they continued moving through the maze of trenches.

“We went a little further around a curve and were face to face with a German soldier. We were both equally stunned, but I grabbed him, and I figured this might be a good time to have a prisoner instead of killing him right then and there. I said, ‘Let’s send him down to the company commander,’ who was down at the beach with dead and wounded men maintaining order.”

“I sent the prisoner down the cliff,” he said. “I don’t know if he got down on his own or if they pushed him down—that was immaterial to me.”

It quickly became obvious that it would be silly to move much farther inland with so few men, Salomon said. “We proceeded to knock out a machine gun section and a mortar section. . . . We knocked out the German position and figured that we were doing our best by still holding our ground.”

***

“We could see the action from the landing craft as we came in,” recalled Ellis “Bill” Reed, a member of the U.S. Army 5th Ranger Battalion who fought at Omaha Dog White on D-Day. “There was a tremendous amount of firepower coming from both flanks. Machine gun fire and artillery fire was pouring in.”

Already, the beach in front of Reed and the other Rangers was littered with the bodies of Americans who had landed only to be gunned down by the Germans. Reed “had to run across about 150 yards of beach” with his platoon leader and his buddy Woody Doorman, who was a bangalore torpedo man. “Our job was to place the torpedo under the wire and detonate it, ripping a hole in the wire for the rest of the troops to move through.”

But before they could carry out their mission, they first had to reach the wire. “When we exited the landing craft many people had flotation belts, and if the water was over your neck you would turn upside down,” Reed remembered. “When we got off the boat and into the wet sand we had to run for the seawall. Men were dying around us, lying in different positions, and tanks were burning.”

Dashing behind the seawall, Reed heard General Cota, the commanding officer on the beach, utter the fateful words that became a motto for the Rangers: “Rangers, lead the way!”

Doorman and Reed did just that. “Woody and I had to assemble each piece of the torpedo, get up from behind the seawall, push the bangalore torpedo across the road on top of the bluff and put it under the concertina wire,” Reed explained. “Once we had the torpedo in place, we took the fuse wire out, pulled the fuse, and yelled, ‘Fire in the hole!’ and jumped back over the wall. The result, if it worked, was a hole in the concertina wire.”

With a laugh, Reed added, “They [the Germans] didn’t stop firing while we were doing this, if you know what I mean. They were firing down the line, and there was a lot of machine gun and mortar fire. I don’t know if I was so scared or what, but I moved as fast as I could to get everything set.” Still chuckling, he continued, “I made sure the fuse lighter went off, since we were told in our training that if it didn’t go off we were to sacrifice our bodies and lay on the concertina wire as the men stepped on us. So I made damn sure that the torpedo detonated.”

The torpedo worked as intended, blasting a hole in the German defenses and creating a crucial exit off Omaha Beach. “As the men moved through our holes in the wire, one of our scouts got cut in half by a machine gun,” Reed recalled. “I was told to fire the rifle grenade at a machine gun nest, but like everything else in the U.S. Army, it was a big dud. So at that point Lieutenant Dawson got up and charged it with his submachine gun and kept blasting. When we got up close they put their hands up. I remember that one German had his arm dangling by only a piece of flesh. That was our first visual face-to-face contact with the enemy.”

That was far from the last time the Rangers would meet Germans face-to-face. The elite American forces led the way across Europe, their sacrifices ensuring that freedom and democracy would continue to thrive, as they do to this day.

History Facts: Palestinian Leadership loved Adolf Hitler, NOT the Jews

History Facts:

Palestinian Leadership loved Adolf Hitler, NOT the Jews

Tlaib Israel Comments: A ‘calming feeling’ over Palestinian love for the Jews

 

tlaib anti-semitism

Tlaib anti-semitism

As reported on OneNewsNow, both Minnesota Congresswoman Ilhan Omar and Michigan Congresswoman Rashida Tlaib recently condemned Israel when it responded to yet another massive rocket attack on Israeli civilians by Hamas.

Both women, who are freshman lawmakers, have created problems for Democratic leaders who have criticized their comments, or made excuses for their behavior, even while fellow lawmakers have criticized the criticism.

Tlaib, who is Palestinian, is now making headlines after making the claim that her Palestinian ancestors provided a “safe haven” for Jews after World War II and the Holocaust, when they gave up their land “and some lost their lives” to Jews.

But a fact-checking article at The Washington Examiner ripped Tlaib’s claims apart, pointing out that Jews already occupied the land over the objections of Arab neighbors.

Palestinian leader Muhammad Amin loved Hitler, not the Jews

Mufti with Hitler

Mufti with Hitler

The story by Phillip Klein also pointed out how Muhammad Amin al-Husayni (pictured above), the Palestinian leader during World War II, openly allied with Adolph Hitler to recruit Muslim soldiers and to broadcast pro-German, anti-Jewish propaganda to Arab listeners.

Tlaib Lies in Historical Context

Yet the congresswoman told an interviewer she has a “calming feeling” when she thinks of how Palestinians helped Jews after World War II.

Memorial Day: Remembering World War 2 Heroes

Memorial Day: Remembering World War 2 Heroes

This World War II Soldier’s Story Reminds Us of Why Memorial Day Matters

James Carafano

memorial-day2arlingtonIf any day is more than just a day, then Memorial Day is it.

Sometimes remembering just one soldier reminds us why.

His name was Lawrence Gordon. He grew-up on a hard-scrabble farm in Canada. After Pearl Harbor, he decided to join the American Army. The Americans had better “kit.”

The Army sent Gordon into the center of the storm, as the allies battled from the beaches of Normandy breaking through the German defenses and then racing to encircle the enemy as it withdrew from France.

Gordon was on the sharp edge of the bayonet. His cavalry unit, in thinly skinned armored vehicles, was dispatched way to the front or the flanks to find the enemy before the more heavily armored columns were called up to engage. Sometimes “finding” the enemy started with a wild exchange of gunfire or the unexpected burst of mortar rounds. Patrols could go from tense silence to vicious firefights in seconds. Gordon’s letters home to the family and his girl kept up their spirits with assurances he was safe and surrounded by dependable comrades and delivered a travelogue of his little unit’s march across France.

One day the letters stopped.

The family received a partially burned wallet. They knew it was his. The picture of his girl was singed but still recognizable. But other than a few personal effects, there was no explanation of what had happened to Lawrence Gordon—and no body. He was missing in action—and would remain so for almost 70 years.

A documentary, “Honoring a Commitment,” by a young filmmaker named Jeb Henry, tells the extraordinary story of how his loved ones found Private Gordon and brought him home.

The new film, recently screened at The Heritage Foundation in partnership with National Review, is part detective story and part love story, a journey of a family’s determined unrelenting effort to find and honor a brave man.

Remembering Private Gordon is important for all of us. Any remembrance of war that doesn’t include the telling of individual stories lessens the purpose of the day–and why it is important that we remember.

Sometimes the enormity of war overwhelms the truth that all great struggles are just the sum of individual stories. Each is more than just the story of one soldier’s service and sacrifice. Their service ripples across their families, friends and their communities. Memorial Day reminds us it is the noble sacrifice of many that makes us who we are.

Every soldier’s story of World War II is worth telling. Every story of every soldier in every war has value. Every generation of American soldiers is the greatest generation. What is most extraordinary about the extraordinary story of Private Gordon and his extraordinary family is that it is singularly representative of what the fight for freedom and the eternal struggle for the preservation of liberty really means.

MemorialDay1They Stood For Something and We Owe Them Something’: Reagan’s 1986 Memorial Day Speech

Remembering Those Who Never Came Home

Memorial Day: Museum Honors War Heroes

National WWII museum: WE OWE THEM

vetsweowethemHe blinked his eyes rapidly and tears began to moisten his 90-year-old cheeks as memories of war flooded his mind.

“I guess everybody has those feelings,” World War II veteran Harry Robinson told AFA Journal about his recent trip to the National World War II Museum in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Robinson grew up on a farm in Clay County, Mississippi, and voluntarily joined the U.S. Marine Corps when he was 18 years old. After his enlistment, he rode a train from Jackson, Mississippi, to San Diego, California, and then spent two-and-one-half years overseas. Robinson served as a cook and a baker, so he didn’t experience actual combat other than an invasion of Guam that included his platoon. And he was at home on leave when the bomb was dropped on Hiroshima.

But the war was real; Robinson was a part of it and forever impacted by it.

“I have forgiven, but I haven’t forgotten,” Robinson said. His memories became reality again as he and his family toured the museum.

“I’m so thankful I came back [from war] without a bruise or anything,” he said while fighting back tears. “So many people lost their lives over there. I hope that visitors to the museum recognize the fact that so many gave their lives.”

The National World War II Museum opened its doors June 6, 2000, after its founder, the late  historian Steven Ambrose, had the idea to build it in memory of Andrew Jackson Higgins. Higgins built the boats that were used as landing craft by the United States to win WWII. Higgins Shipyard in New Orleans built some 20,000 of those boats, thus the reason the museum is located in the Big Easy.

“The museum tells the story of the American experience in the war that changed the world,” William M. “Bill” Detweiler, J.D., told AFA Journal. “It tells why it was fought, how it was won, and what it means today so that all generations will understand the price of freedom and be inspired by what they learn. That’s our mission statement.”

Detweiler is the museum’s consultant for military and veterans affairs.

“The museum is a passion for me,” Detweiler said. He has been with the museum since before there was a museum, dating back to his service as national commander of the American Legion (1994-95). During that time he was in a dispute with the Smithsonian Institute over the display of the Enola Gay, a Boeing B-29 Superfortress WWII bomber that became the first aircraft to drop an atomic bomb.

“I got involved on behalf of the American Legion and spent my whole year as national commander trying to defend the courage and honor of the men and women of the war years and to defend President Truman’s decision to drop the bombs to bring the war to a conclusion,” Detweiler explained.

Because of his work, he was elected to the board of the museum a few years later.

Ceremonies
Presently, Detweiler handles all of the outreach and relations dealing with the military on both the local and national levels. This involves special ceremonies presented by the museum as well as assisting with special functions initiated by branches of the military.

“We host major ceremonies on patriotic holidays like Armed Forces Day, Memorial Day, Veterans Day, and the Fourth of July,” Detweiler said.

Plans are still being finalized for this year’s Memorial Day celebration, but in years past it has consisted of a speaker, music by the museum’s Navy band and Marine Corps band, and a POW/MIA ceremony provided by a Jr. ROTC cadet program from one of the local high schools.

“It’s a very elaborate ceremony that’s put on by these high school students in memory of those who have paid the supreme sacrifice and have been lost in war,” Detweiler explained. The Memorial Day program is scheduled to begin at 10:30 a.m. (CT) and is open to the public.

On June 6, the museum is planning a major observance to mark the 70th anniversary of the invasion of Normandy. There is a related event planned almost every day during the week of June 1-8.

Education
The museum reaches out not only to veterans and their loved ones but also to families, schools, students and the community. The purpose of the museum is to help people understand WWII, how it influences the world today and what future generations can learn from it.

“In order to keep young people interested, the exhibits have to be such that they appeal to younger people and that they raise their interests and keep their attention,” Detweiler said.

That’s why the museum always has an ongoing project and is constantly incorporating advanced technology to make the museum relevant both now and in the future.

One of the most powerful aspects of the museum, according to Detweiler, is a feature presentation titled Beyond All Boundaries that runs daily on the hour. It’s a 4-D film produced by actor Tom Hanks that tells the story of the war in less than an hour.

The museum also houses thousands of oral histories, statements from WWII veterans and members of the home front. One of the museum pavilions has been remodeled to look like a train station from the 1940s. Visitors purchase tickets and board a train car that uses technology to take them on a computerized ride through the countryside in order to experience life during the era.

At the museum’s Stage Door Canteen, bands play, the Victory Belles sing, and swing dance lessons are taught on occasion. In the restoration facility, visitors can watch as men and women work to restore a WWII patrol boat similar to the one on which President John F. Kennedy served.

The United States Freedom Pavilion, which opened earlier this year, houses five vintage WWII planes. The planes hang 90 feet in the air, and catwalks allow visitors to walk right up to the planes and look inside them.

There are various hands-on educational projects, events and exhibits like the Classroom Victory Garden Project that teaches elementary students the importance of community during a time of war. The museum holds summer camps for children as well as various activities for families including Night at the Museum, when a child and parent stay in the museum overnight, watch movies and make crafts.

“We’re an educational facility,” Detweiler explained. “We are not a museum of guns and bullets. We’re not about gore. No veteran who has ever seen combat wants to see war or combat again.

“We want families to realize the sacrifices and what it took, what these men and women did, in order to earn and protect the freedoms that we continue to enjoy today,” he said. “We really encourage families who still have a living World War II vet or family member who was working on the home front during World War II to come on in and take a look. It’s worth the visit. It really is.”

– See more at: http://www.afajournal.org/archives/2010-present/2014/may/features/national-wwii-museum-reminds-us-%E2%80%A6-we-owe-them.aspx#sthash.8QMGv7Rg.dpuf

 

For more information:
National World War II Museum
504-528-1944
info@nationalww2museum.org – See more at: http://www.afajournal.org/archives/2010-present/2014/may/features/national-wwii-museum-reminds-us-%E2%80%A6-we-owe-them.aspx#sthash.8QMGv7Rg.dpuf

Memorial Day History: Honor the Fallen War Heroes

Dinner Topics for Memorial Day

Support, Donate to Paralyzed Veterans

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Memorial Day History: Honor the Fallen War Heroes

Some gave all

keyLord God of Hosts, be with us yet,
Lest we forget—lest we forget!

The tumult and the shouting dies—
The Captains and the Kings depart—
Still stands Thine ancient sacrifice,
An humble and a contrite heart.

Judge of the Nations, spare us yet,
Lest we forget—lest we forget! ~Rudyard Kipling

memorialdaysomegaveallTeddy James, AFA Journal

In Flanders Fields* by John McCrae
In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.
We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie in Flanders fields.
Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow in Flanders fields.
*Public domain

To some, it is just a flag, resting in a triangular box on a mantle. To others, it explains why there’s an odd number of place settings at the table, why the opposite side of the bed stays cold, why there’s a vacant seat at graduation, why a bride walks down the aisle alone.

To some, it is just a day, an excuse for a three-day weekend to barbeque and celebrate the beginning of summer. To others, it is a day to be alone, remembering daughters they can’t hug, dads they can’t call, friends they couldn’t save, brothers who saved them with the ultimate sacrifice.

Who we remember

soldierbrave-paulrsmith-medalhonorArmy Sergeant First Class Paul R. Smith was part of B Company, 11th Engineer Battalion of the 3rd Infantry Division. On April 4, 2003, Smith participated in building an impromptu prisoner of war holding area in Baghdad, Iraq. During the construction, his unit was attacked by a group of Iraqi fighters. During the battle, an M113 Armored Personnel Carrier was hit, wounding the three soldiers inside. Smith saw to the evacuation of the injured soldiers. There was an aid station directly behind Smith and his team with already over 100 combat casualties. Smith and his team were the only obstacle between Iraqi attackers and the aid station.

Smith climbed into a damaged M113 to man its .50 caliber machine gun and ordered the driver to reposition the vehicle so he could fire on the enemy, leaving himself unprotected and exposed to enemy fire. He went through three boxes of ammunition before his gun fell silent.

Afterward, Smith’s team found him slumped over the machine gun. His armor showed 13 bullet holes. Before he died, he had wiped out over 50 enemy combatants and saved many American lives. SFC Smith was posthumously awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor.

Smith and countless other heroes who have given their all for America are who Memorial Day is for.

Why we remember

vetsweowethemNo fewer than two dozen cities claim to be the birthplace of Memorial Day, originally called Decoration Day. President Lyndon B. Johnson declared Waterloo, New York, the original site in 1966. While the site is disputed, it is clear the tradition started around 1866 as a way to memorialize soldiers who died during the Civil War.

In 1868, General John Legend, national commander of the Grand Army of the Republic, issued this proclamation: “The 30th of May, 1868, is designated for the purpose of strewing with flowers, or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion, and whose bodies now lie in almost every city, village, and hamlet churchyard in the land.”

soldiersfallenlestweforget2General Legend chose the date because it was not the anniversary of any particular battle.

In the little town of Columbus, Mississippi, also claiming to be the birthplace of Decoration Day, the tradition began with families entering cemeteries and caring for the graves of Confederate soldiers. It expanded when a group of women noticed local Union soldiers’ graves in disrepair and took it on themselves to correct the situation by pulling weeds, placing flowers, and paying respect.

The sentiment covered the country, and today, Memorial Day pays homage to those who surrendered their lives for a purpose they deemed bigger than their personal safety.

Memorial Day’s storied history continues to live in prose, legend, and lyrics. Canadian physician Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae wrote “In Flanders Fields,” a stirring poem published in 1915. The legend says he was inspired to write it after presiding over the funeral of his friend and fellow soldier Alexis Helmer, who died in World War I.

Inspired by McCrae’s poem, Moina Michael responded with “We Shall Keep the Faith.” She wrote:

soldiersfallenlestweforget1And now the Torch and Poppy Red
We wear in honor of our dead.
Fear not that ye have died for naught;
We’ll teach the lesson that ye wrought
In Flanders Fields.

Michael decided to wear a red poppy on Memorial Day in honor of all soldiers whose blood was shed not only in Flanders fields, but also everywhere across the globe. Today many veterans’ groups hand out poppies for Memorial Day and Veterans Day.

How we remember
libertyMorrill Worcester won a trip to Washington, D.C., and Arlington National Cemetery when he was 12. The image of rows and rows of headstones lodged itself in the mind of the preteen. The sight taught him real people gave their lives to pay for the freedom he enjoyed every day. That lesson never left him.

Years later, Worcester founded his successful business, Worcester Wreaths, in Harrington, Maine. One year he had a surplus of Christmas wreaths, and the image of Arlington’s unadorned headstones came back to his mind. With the help of Sen. Olympia Snowe (ME-R) and other volunteers, Worcester placed the wreaths in an older section at Arlington.

Worcester and his team quietly kept the tradition until 2005 when an image of the gravestones, semi-covered in snow and decorated with an evergreen wreath and hand-tied red bow, took the Internet by storm. Support poured in from people wanting to donate money for more wreaths in Arlington; others asked how they could start laying wreaths in national or state cemeteries close to home.

From the outpouring of support, Worcester and a team developed Wreaths Across America, and the movement continues to grow. In 2013, the volunteer wreath brigade laid over 540,000 Remembrance Wreaths at 908 locations. The wreaths are another fitting tribute to those who gave their lives for our freedom.

Express your thanks
• Sponsor a wreath now that will be laid on December 13, National Wreaths Across America Day.
• Volunteer to lay wreaths at your local cemetery.
• Start a community fundraiser.
• Make Memorial Day an opportunity to serve those left behind. Spouses and children of deceased soldiers should hold a
special place in the heart of every American. They paid – and are paying – a price too.
• Build a relationship with the family of a fallen soldier. Learn their needs and meet them.
• Make this Memorial Day more than an excuse to barbeque. Let it be the starting point of a lifetime honoring, respecting, and remembering our military heroes.
• Contact U.S. senators or congressmen or local veterans organizations to ask for information on local Memorial Day events or projects.

For more information, visit wreathsacrossamerica.org or call 877-385-9504.

http://www.afajournal.org/recent-issues/2015/may/some-gave-all/