Truth in Journalism: Trump visit to UK trumps Mainstream Media Censorship, Fake News activities

Truth in Journalism:

Trump visit to UK trumps Mainstream Media Censorship, Fake News activities

Critical thinking skills.This is good training in discerning truth from deception. The mainstream media is totally debunked as a reliable news source. ~C.A. Davidson

Great Week for Trump, Bad Week for Drive-By Media

RUSH: Despite the best efforts of CNN, New York Times, the Washington Post to portray this as something it wasn’t, the queen was utterly charmed by Donald Trump.

Fake News: The Protests that didn’t happen

June 3, 2019

Trump UK visit

Trump UK visit

RUSH: All right. So here, it’s everything, it’s Fox News, PMS, NBC, CNN, they’re all breathlessly waiting. So somebody told ’em that massive protests are scheduled. If massive protests are scheduled, they can’t be spontaneous. They’ve gotta be bought, paid for, and planned.

They all bought it, they all believed it, they all assumed it was gonna happen, and then today came, and there weren’t any. There were zilch, zero, nada. There weren’t any protests. Nobody showed up! And we have a random act of journalism on CNN. They actually told the truth about it. Some reporter named Nick Patton Walsh.

 

Trump-UK-Queen

Trump-UK-Queen

RUSH: Now, Donald Trump in the United Kingdom.  Big, big mistake. Now we found that… Remember the story we had…? I think it was Monday. This is Wednesday, so it was Monday.

The media has been working overtime to manufacture a spat and a disagreement and a state of dislike between the queen and Donald Trump. And while doing that, they were holding out hope and promoting and warning everybody about massive anti-Trump protests that didn’t happen — and the queen loves Trump! You can see it in the pictures. The queen is charmed by the president and actually asked him to come back to our country as soon as you can, on his departure. You can see it in all the pictures.

Pres. Trump, Melania, Queen Elizabeth, UK

Pres. Trump, Melania, Queen Elizabeth, UK

Despite the best efforts of CNN, New York Times, the Washington Post to portray this as something it wasn’t, the queen was utterly charmed by Donald Trump. Melania Trump was an absolute star on this trip. And the photos of her and the president chatting… There was a dinner. I guess they hosted a dinner last night for Prince Charles and the Duchess of “Cornwallis,” whatever, Camilla, and are waiting for ’em to show up.

And Trump and Melania are standing there like a married couple of many years chatting and laughing with each other and winking and nodding and so forth. It was utterly a completely different picture than what you get from the Drive-By Media. (impression) “Melania can’t wait to get out! Melania’s so embarrassed! Melania worries about her young son growing up with such an ogre.” None of this is true.

The British press, as I say, totally flipped and wrote a bunch of positive stuff about this trip.

d day pointe du hoc

DDayPointe-du-Hoc Normandy Beach

RUSH: Yeah. Here it is right here in the U.K. Daily Mail: “‘I hope you come to this country again soon:’ What the Queen told Donald Trump at the end of his state visit as he bid fond farewell to Britain following moving ceremony to salute the heroes of D-Day” 75 years ago. D-Day. You wonder how many young people know about it, what it really was, why it was important. Is it taught anymore?

I’ve been over there twice. I’ve been to the Normandy beaches twice. I’ve been to the cemetery. I’ve been to Pointe du Hoc in France. You see where it happened — and if you have enough information about what happened, it cannot help but move you. The first time I was there was the 50th anniversary. I was there the week after they celebrated it, 25 years ago. It was a moving, moving ceremony that they had. There were even some people still alive who had participated in it, and they were able to participate in the ceremony.

Obama’s gift to the Queen

Do you remember what Obama gave the queen? Let me tell you. He gave the queen an iPod with his speeches recorded on it. Now, we don’t know what the queen — we never saw a public reaction. I will guarantee you — well, I can’t guarantee you, but the odds are the queen laughed and looked at the that iPod, said, “Who does this guy think he is?” Because the queen knew that Obama had no love lost for the Brits. The Brits were colonialists, Obama hated colonialists. And I think the gift of a bunch of speeches was really a diss, in a way. He knew she wasn’t gonna listen to his words. But if she did, I guarantee you the first speeches on there would have been what Obama thought of the Brits. Remember the story about removing the bust of Winston Churchill out of the Oval Office? That story went back and forth, true, false. It did get moved. Not out of the White House, but it was moved out of the Oval Office after Obama was inaugurated.

 

Trump’s Gift to the Queen. . . Memorializes D-Day and World War I

 

RUSH: Let me tell you something about the queen. People have forgotten. Let me interrupt you here. Do you guys remember Trump gave the queen a tremendous gift.

“Trump gave the queen a silver and silk poppy brooch from Tiffany & Co. in a custom wood White House jewelry box…

“The poppy symbolizes remembrance for those who died in World War I, though the White House could have chosen the gift for the 75th anniversary of D-Day on Thursday.” He may have had

trump uk visit

Pres. Trump, Queen Elizabeth, UK

done it for that reason which, as you know, is tomorrow. “Prince Philip,” the husband of the queen — who is not doing well, folks. These people have remarkable longevity, but nevertheless, Prince Philip is not doing well. “Prince Philip received a personalized Air Force One jacket as well as a first-edition, signed copy of World War II aviator James Doolittle’s autobiography, I Could Never Be So Lucky Again.

“The gifts pointed to the fact that Prince Philip was a pilot and served in World War II, according to Town & Country. According to [Town & Country magazine], these official gift exchanges require consultation with the State Department. The first lady’s spokeswoman Stephanie Grisham told CNN Melania Trump was ‘very involved with the gift selection,’ alongside the State Department.” So I wanted to get all of that straight. 

Great Week for Trump, Bad Week for Drive-By Media

Two Polls That Are Good News for Trump

RUSH: “Americans View Fake News as a Bigger Problem Than Terrorism.” Holy smokes!

  • This has been a very bad week — and it’s only Wednesday — for the Drive-By Media worldwide. Remember the story about the dead North Korean officials that were executed? They’re walking around. They’re alive. They are above ground. As we say on the golf course, “They’re on the right side of the grass.”

Social Media Abuse of Power

  • The African-American forklift operator who put together the satirical video of Pelosi appearing to slur her words? And we were told that an enterprising journalist called Facebook and ferreted out the truth, and Facebook just divulged (because the reporter wanted to know) the name of the person that did it. It turns out that the media used convicted felons to dox this guy. We were not told the truth about how his identity was learned.

RUSH: There’s a new poll out, a CNN poll. They are not happy reporting this poll. The upshot of the CNN poll is more than two-thirds of the American people are happy with the economy. (impression) “That… that… that… that…” They got a problem. They’ve got to do something about that at CNN. They’ve been trying to do something about that and they’re obviously failing. Two-thirds happy with the economy.

 

And then here is a story from the Millennial website called Axios, and this headline is a big win for Trump. It’s a poll from the Pew Research Center. “Americans View Fake News as a Bigger Problem Than Terrorism.”

Two Polls That Are Good News for Trump

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D Day Meaning: D Day invasion in Normandy is about Survival of Western Civilization

D Day Meaning:

D Day invasion in Normandy is about Survival of Western Civilization

President Trump’s Moving Speech at Normandy

Jun 6, 2019

RUSH: If you didn’t hear President Trump’s speech at Normandy today because of the time difference, you really need to.

THE PRESIDENT: We are gathered here on freedom’s altar. On these shores, on these bluffs, on this day 75 years ago, 10,000 men shed their blood and thousands sacrificed their lives for their brothers, for their countries, and for the survival of liberty. Today we remember those who fell, and we honor all who fought right here in Normandy. They won back this ground for civilization. To more than 170 veterans of the Second World War who join us today, you are among the very greatest Americans who will ever live. You are the pride of our nation, you are the glory of our republic, and we thank you from the bottom of our hearts.

In the early morning hours, the two brothers stood together on the deck of the USS Henrico before boarding two separate Higgins landing craft. “If I don’t make it,” Bill said, “please, please take care of my family.” Ray asked his brother to do the same. Of the 31 men on Ray’s landing craft, only Ray and six others made it to the beach. There were only a few of them left. Again and again, Ray ran back into the water.

He dragged out one man after another. He was shot through the arm. His leg was ripped open by shrapnel. His back was broken. He nearly drowned. He woke up the next day on a cot beside another badly wounded soldier. He looked over and saw his brother, Bill. They made it! They made it! They made it!

At 98 years old, Ray is here with us today with his fourth Purple Heart and his third Silver Star from Omaha.THE PRESIDENT: Ray, the Free World salutes you.

Private First Class Russell Pickett of the 29th Division’s famed 116th Infantry Regiment had been wounded in the first wave that landed on Omaha Beach. At a hospital in England, Private Pickett vowed to return to battle. Six days after D-Day, he rejoined his company. Before long, a grenade left Private Pickett and he was gravely wounded — so badly wounded. Again, he chose to return. He didn’t care. He had to be here. He was then wounded a third time and laid conscience for 12 days. They thought he was gone. They had he had no chance. Russell Pickett is the last known survivor of the legendary Company A. And today, believe it or not, he has returned once more to these shores to be with his comrades.

CROWD: (applause)

THE PRESIDENT: Private Pickett you honor us all with your presence.

To all of our friends and partners, our cherished alliance was forged in the heat of battle, tested in the trials of war, and proven in the blessings of peace. Our bond is unbreakable. From across the earth Americans are drawn to this place as though it were a part of our very soul. We come not only because of what they did here, we come because of who they were.

They were young men with their entire lives before them. They were husbands who said good-bye to their young brides and took their duty as their fate. There were fathers who would never meet their infant sons and daughters ’cause they had a job to do. And with God as their witness, they were going to get it done. More powerful than the strength of American arms was the strength of American hearts.

These men ran through the fires of hell, moved by a force no weapon could destroy: the fierce patriotism of a free, proud, and sovereign people. They battled not for control and domination, but for liberty, democracy, and self-rule. They were sustained by the confidence that America can do anything because we are a noble nation with a virtuous people, praying to a righteous God. The exceptional might came from a truly exceptional spirit.

To the men who sit behind me and to the boys who rest in the field before me, your example will never, ever grow old.

CROWD: (applause)

THE PRESIDENT: Your legend will never die. Your spirit, brave, unyielding, and true, will never die. The blood that they spilled, the tears that they shed, the lives that they gave, the sacrifice that they made did not just win a battle. It did not just win a war. Those who fought here won a future for our nation.

They won the Survival of Western Civilization

They won the survival of our civilization, and they showed us the way to love, cherish, and defend our way of life for many centuries to come. Today as we stand together upon this sacred earth, we pledge that our nation will forever be strong and united. We will forever be together.

Our people will forever be bold. Our hearts will forever be loyal. And our children and their children will forever and always be free. May God bless our great veterans. May God bless our allies. May God bless the heroes of D-Day. And may God bless America. Thank you. Thank you very much.

Obama’s Speech

RUSH: That was Andrea Mitchell (NBC News, Washington) saying, of course, “This was not Donald Trump speaking…” Christiane Amanpour: “Absolutely perfect speech.” John Berman at CNN: “It wasn’t a speech about him.” “He really rose to the occasion. He stuck to the script,” blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. Again, how striking it is that these people will never understand Trump.

Trump makes everything about him in his speeches? Let me show you somebody who did that all the time. Audio sound bite number 3.

December 10th, 2019, Oslo. This is Barack Obama receiving the Nobel Peace Prize for having done nothing. He’d only been in office two months when he got the Nobel Peace Prize! They gave him the Nobel Peace Prize on the come, because they said he wanted peace.

 What they really knew was that Obama was gonna downsize the United States. Obama was gonna rein in the power of the United States. Why give somebody the peace prize who hasn’t done diddly-squat yet? So here is Obama, December 10, 2009, accepting his Nobel Peace Prize…

OBAMA (montage):

 I receive this honor yet because I am I cannot deny I am I’m a responsible and so I come I do not bring what I do know I make I am living I know there’s nothing weak I cannot I face the world I raise this point I believe I like any I am convinced I believe I understand but I also know I believe that is why II ordered why I have reaffirmed I have spoken I believe I am committed I’m working I believe I know that but I also note I do not I refuse I refuse to accept the idea I reject these choices.

RUSH: We didn’t repeat one of those. By the way, it didn’t take long before the Nobel committee was being told, “You know, you need to pull that prize back. This guy’s is the biggest warmonger we’ve seen in a long time.” The United States was in war every day of this guy’s administration — and when it came to drone kills, Obama practically flew the drones. He had a kill list! Obama demanded to have the kill list run by him every day. He determined who died via the drone strikes in the Middle East.

 

President Trump’s Moving Speech at Normandy

 

Understanding the Enormity of D-Day

Millennials’ Ignorance of History; do not appreciate D Day Meaning

Jun 6, 2019

You talk about the Gen X today, the Gen Z, and the Millennials… What happened in the 1940s and World War II is incomprehensible to them, and it’s ancient history and irrelevant to a lot of them.

RUSH: There’s a reason the people who did all this are called the Greatest Generation. Because this wasn’t the only challenge they faced.

You talk about the Gen X today, the Gen Z, and the Millennials… What happened in the 1940s and World War II is incomprehensible to them, and it’s ancient history and irrelevant to a lot of them. And it will never happen again. That kind of warfare can never happen again. There were no satellite photographs, there were no satellites, period, in the 1940s. There was no way. There were no precision-guided bombs. There was no technology whatsoever. The Germans had this code machine called the Enigma. It took years to decipher it. We had our own coding system. But warfare that requires massive numbers of human beings to storm beaches and climb cliffs with rifles and shotguns, those days are forever gone.

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, you remember when she announced her Green New Deal? She said that the issue of climate change was her generation’s World War II. Okay, let’s synthesize that. D-Day. D-Day is symbolic with winning World War II; so she claims that the Green New Deal is her generation’s D-Day.

It’s not relevant to this, except that she came out yesterday and made a similar claim that climate change is this generation’s D-Day. Now, this is ludicrous. It’s childish silliness. Anybody with any sense, any knowledge of history at all would have to scoff at this comparison. (impression) “Climate change is the equivalent of D-Day today, that’s the big challenge, we’ve gotta storm the beaches at Normandy to save not just America now, but to save the planet.” And it’s what I alluded to earlier. We Baby Boomers, we’ve had to invent our traumas to tell ourselves our lives have meaning and that we had challenges to overcome.

And the Millennials are doing the same thing, people desperate to find meaning in their lives. Ocasio-Cortez epitomizes this. Her life, the lives of Millennials. So equating something this historical and monumental, the significance of winning World War II to the weather, to the climate, is absurd. But I think we may be facing, nevertheless, a World War II-like situation today. It just doesn’t have anything to do with the weather.

The D-Day 75 Anniversary – Freedom Isn’t Free”. Political Cartoon by A.F. Branco ©2019.

See more Conservative Daily News cartoons here

 

The World War II Challenge We Face

History Facts: Remembering the War Heroes of D-Day Invasion

History Facts:

Remembering the War Heroes of D-Day Invasion

O’Donnell: Beyond Valor: Rangers Lead the Way on D-Day

That was far from the last time the Rangers would meet Germans face-to-face. The elite American forces led the way across Europe, their sacrifices ensuring that freedom and democracy would continue to thrive, as they do to this day.

Patrick K. O’Donnell

“We were about two hundred feet from the beach when a shell blew off the front of our landing craft, destroying the ramp,” recalled Ray Alm from B Company of the 2nd Ranger Battalion, which landed on Omaha’s deadly Dog Green Beach at approximately 7:40 a.m. on D-Day. “My two best buddies were right in front of me, and they were both killed. I was holding a .45 pistol and carrying a bazooka with eight shells; it was so heavy that I just went right under the water. So I had to let everything go except the shells.”

He continued, “When we were on the beach, there were two other Rangers and myself running, and a German machine gun was firing at us. We hid behind an anti-tank obstacle. The three of us ducked behind it. We then headed towards the front again. It was terrible; there were bodies all over the place. They wiped out almost the entire 116th Infantry Regiment; they just murdered them. They were floating all over the place, there was blood in the water—it was just dark.”

This June 6 marks the 73rd anniversary of D-Day. Nothing captures the drama and action of that day better than the words of the men who actually took part in the assault. Particularly poignant are the voices of the elite Army Rangers who led the way off bloody Omaha Beach.

Sadly, most of the men who remember that day have passed on. But their voices are immortalized in Beyond Valor: World War II’s Ranger and Airborne Veterans Reveal the Heart of Combat. For nearly twenty-five years, I’ve been interviewing American veterans from WWI to Iraq, and I have captured more than 4,000 oral histories from WWII veterans in elite units such as the Rangers. These men were my friends, men my daughter called uncle. In many cases, these great Americans did the impossible. Their individual actions changed history, and they did their duty in the face of tremendous odds.

On the morning of D-Day, members of the 5th and 2nd Ranger Battalions were making their way through the choppy waters off Normandy to their D-Day objectives. They were divided into three different groups, each focused on specific military targets. Their primary focus was the guns of Pointe du Hoc and the deadly German mortars on the high ground to the extreme left of Omaha.

For the bulk of the Rangers, including the 5th Battalion, their secondary objective if Pointe du Hoc failed was Omaha Beach. Faulty radar and failed radio transmissions led to a chain of events that put the 5th and several companies of the 2nd Rangers on their secondary objective: Omaha. At the right place, at exactly the right time, they led a crucial breakout.

Here are two of their stories:

“We went up on toeholds and by digging our fingernails and bayonets into the ninety foot cliff. . . . When we got up on top we had only nine men left in my platoon,” recalled my dear friend Lt. Sid Salomon.

Salomon was one of the first Rangers on the beach. C Company of the 2nd Ranger Battalion landed at 0645. Dodging mortar and machine-gun fire, the men scaled ninety-foot cliffs of Pointe-et-Raz-de-la-Percée. Under fire, the Rangers made it to the top and attacked the Germans in an effort to deny them crucial high ground over the Charlie sector of Omaha Beach.

“We had two platoons, each in its own landing craft,” Salomon said. “I was in charge of one, and the other platoon leader was in charge of the other. Our goal was to cross the beach, climb the cliff, and neutralize the mortars and machine guns that were positioned on top of a beach that intelligence had indicated could threaten the landing at Omaha Beach.”

The fight began even before the Rangers reached the shore. “The trip was tough coming in,” Solomon said. “Keep in mind, it was postponed due to rough seas. The men started getting sick. We were issued paper bags, like you get in airplanes. The men filled them up and threw them over the side. Some men started using their helmets. We could hear the ping of the machine gun bullets hitting the side of the landing craft, and mortar shells were landing near the landing craft. I could see the concentric circles formed by the shells hitting the water. It was quite something, of course. One of the men joked, ‘Hey, they’re firing at us.’ It added a little humor to the situation.”

When the landing craft hit the beach, Solomon was the first to exit the vessel. “When I jumped off, I held my tommy gun over my head. I jumped into not-quite-chest-high water, and it took a few seconds to get my feet on the ground. In the meantime, the second man, Sergeant Reed, jumped off to the left. I always figured that the first man out would be hit. Fortunately, the Germans didn’t know when the ramp would lower. But they had us zeroed in with their machine guns, and the second man, Reed, was hit. He had fallen down, wounded, and had slid underneath the ramp.”

Solomon dragged Reed to the water’s edge and told him, “Sergeant, this is as far as I can take you, I have to get along.”

Then he took off running. “A mortar shell landed right behind me and killed or wounded all of my mortar section. I got some of the shrapnel—it hit my back and I landed right on my face. I fell down in the sand and thought I was dead.” Solomon remembered.

But he refused to give up. “Right then and there, I said to myself that I wasn’t going to die. This was no place to be lying, so I took my maps, I got up, and ran toward the overhang of the cliff,” he recalled.

“An aid man came over to me and took my field jacket and shirt off and started digging shrapnel out of my back. These were the days before penicillin, and each man carried a sulfa pack, and he put it on my back.” The medic told him. “That’s all I can do for you now.”

Despite the pain, Solomon began to climb the ninety-foot cliff. “Each man had a six-foot piece of rope that had a noose at the end of it and, ideally, we were to link the ropes together and scale the cliff,” he explained. “We didn’t bother with that since, of course, so many men had gotten killed and wounded. . . . We went up on toeholds and by digging our fingernails and bayonets into the cliff.”

But of the 37 men in the company, only nine would survive the climb.

Those nine had overcome tremendous odds, but the fighting — and the dying — weren’t finished yet. Salomon and a fellow platoon leader lay in a shellhole from where they could see the German trench they next needed to assault. “We were there only a minute or two and all of a sudden Bill Moody, the 1st Platoon commander, fell over on my shoulder. He had been killed by a bullet hole through his eyes,” Salomon recalled.

Without pausing to mourn, Salomon grabbed another of the Rangers who had made it to the top and said, “Let’s go!” They ran and jumped into the trench, following it until they came to a dugout. “I threw a white phosphorous grenade through the entrance and waited a minute,” Salomon explained. “We then sprayed the entrance.” With no one inside, they continued moving through the maze of trenches.

“We went a little further around a curve and were face to face with a German soldier. We were both equally stunned, but I grabbed him, and I figured this might be a good time to have a prisoner instead of killing him right then and there. I said, ‘Let’s send him down to the company commander,’ who was down at the beach with dead and wounded men maintaining order.”

“I sent the prisoner down the cliff,” he said. “I don’t know if he got down on his own or if they pushed him down—that was immaterial to me.”

It quickly became obvious that it would be silly to move much farther inland with so few men, Salomon said. “We proceeded to knock out a machine gun section and a mortar section. . . . We knocked out the German position and figured that we were doing our best by still holding our ground.”

***

“We could see the action from the landing craft as we came in,” recalled Ellis “Bill” Reed, a member of the U.S. Army 5th Ranger Battalion who fought at Omaha Dog White on D-Day. “There was a tremendous amount of firepower coming from both flanks. Machine gun fire and artillery fire was pouring in.”

Already, the beach in front of Reed and the other Rangers was littered with the bodies of Americans who had landed only to be gunned down by the Germans. Reed “had to run across about 150 yards of beach” with his platoon leader and his buddy Woody Doorman, who was a bangalore torpedo man. “Our job was to place the torpedo under the wire and detonate it, ripping a hole in the wire for the rest of the troops to move through.”

But before they could carry out their mission, they first had to reach the wire. “When we exited the landing craft many people had flotation belts, and if the water was over your neck you would turn upside down,” Reed remembered. “When we got off the boat and into the wet sand we had to run for the seawall. Men were dying around us, lying in different positions, and tanks were burning.”

Dashing behind the seawall, Reed heard General Cota, the commanding officer on the beach, utter the fateful words that became a motto for the Rangers: “Rangers, lead the way!”

Doorman and Reed did just that. “Woody and I had to assemble each piece of the torpedo, get up from behind the seawall, push the bangalore torpedo across the road on top of the bluff and put it under the concertina wire,” Reed explained. “Once we had the torpedo in place, we took the fuse wire out, pulled the fuse, and yelled, ‘Fire in the hole!’ and jumped back over the wall. The result, if it worked, was a hole in the concertina wire.”

With a laugh, Reed added, “They [the Germans] didn’t stop firing while we were doing this, if you know what I mean. They were firing down the line, and there was a lot of machine gun and mortar fire. I don’t know if I was so scared or what, but I moved as fast as I could to get everything set.” Still chuckling, he continued, “I made sure the fuse lighter went off, since we were told in our training that if it didn’t go off we were to sacrifice our bodies and lay on the concertina wire as the men stepped on us. So I made damn sure that the torpedo detonated.”

The torpedo worked as intended, blasting a hole in the German defenses and creating a crucial exit off Omaha Beach. “As the men moved through our holes in the wire, one of our scouts got cut in half by a machine gun,” Reed recalled. “I was told to fire the rifle grenade at a machine gun nest, but like everything else in the U.S. Army, it was a big dud. So at that point Lieutenant Dawson got up and charged it with his submachine gun and kept blasting. When we got up close they put their hands up. I remember that one German had his arm dangling by only a piece of flesh. That was our first visual face-to-face contact with the enemy.”

That was far from the last time the Rangers would meet Germans face-to-face. The elite American forces led the way across Europe, their sacrifices ensuring that freedom and democracy would continue to thrive, as they do to this day.

Memorial Day: Remembering World War 2 Heroes

Memorial Day: Remembering World War 2 Heroes

This World War II Soldier’s Story Reminds Us of Why Memorial Day Matters

James Carafano

memorial-day2arlingtonIf any day is more than just a day, then Memorial Day is it.

Sometimes remembering just one soldier reminds us why.

His name was Lawrence Gordon. He grew-up on a hard-scrabble farm in Canada. After Pearl Harbor, he decided to join the American Army. The Americans had better “kit.”

The Army sent Gordon into the center of the storm, as the allies battled from the beaches of Normandy breaking through the German defenses and then racing to encircle the enemy as it withdrew from France.

Gordon was on the sharp edge of the bayonet. His cavalry unit, in thinly skinned armored vehicles, was dispatched way to the front or the flanks to find the enemy before the more heavily armored columns were called up to engage. Sometimes “finding” the enemy started with a wild exchange of gunfire or the unexpected burst of mortar rounds. Patrols could go from tense silence to vicious firefights in seconds. Gordon’s letters home to the family and his girl kept up their spirits with assurances he was safe and surrounded by dependable comrades and delivered a travelogue of his little unit’s march across France.

One day the letters stopped.

The family received a partially burned wallet. They knew it was his. The picture of his girl was singed but still recognizable. But other than a few personal effects, there was no explanation of what had happened to Lawrence Gordon—and no body. He was missing in action—and would remain so for almost 70 years.

A documentary, “Honoring a Commitment,” by a young filmmaker named Jeb Henry, tells the extraordinary story of how his loved ones found Private Gordon and brought him home.

The new film, recently screened at The Heritage Foundation in partnership with National Review, is part detective story and part love story, a journey of a family’s determined unrelenting effort to find and honor a brave man.

Remembering Private Gordon is important for all of us. Any remembrance of war that doesn’t include the telling of individual stories lessens the purpose of the day–and why it is important that we remember.

Sometimes the enormity of war overwhelms the truth that all great struggles are just the sum of individual stories. Each is more than just the story of one soldier’s service and sacrifice. Their service ripples across their families, friends and their communities. Memorial Day reminds us it is the noble sacrifice of many that makes us who we are.

Every soldier’s story of World War II is worth telling. Every story of every soldier in every war has value. Every generation of American soldiers is the greatest generation. What is most extraordinary about the extraordinary story of Private Gordon and his extraordinary family is that it is singularly representative of what the fight for freedom and the eternal struggle for the preservation of liberty really means.

MemorialDay1They Stood For Something and We Owe Them Something’: Reagan’s 1986 Memorial Day Speech

Remembering Those Who Never Came Home

Memorial Day: Price of Freedom, Honoring Heroes, Honoring Fallen Soldiers

Memorial Day:

Price of Freedom—Honoring Heroes, Honoring Fallen soldiers

The Real America still exists.

Recalling the origins of Memorial Day

Did you know that President Trump stood on concrete in the hot sun and shook the hand of every single Naval Academy graduate?

Memorial Day Parade in Trump Country USA

Thanks to A.F. Branco

 

 

Christian Ministry to Veterans: Assistance for PTSD Treatment

Christian Ministry to Veterans:

Assistance for PTSD Treatment

Why not us?

Matthew White

soldier prayingU.S. Marine Chad Robichaux struggled with that question as he considered the challenges combat veterans and military families face. Having completed multiple tours of duty in Afghanistan, he was no stranger to those challenges.

After returning home from his eighth and final deployment, Chad began experiencing symptoms he wasn’t sure how to cope with – desperation, anxiety, arm and face numbness, the feeling that his throat was swelling shut, and panic attacks. Initially he kept these feelings to himself for fear that he would be perceived as weak.

Ironically, he found himself becoming a weak and broken man, not knowing what to do. He was eventually diagnosed with PTSD and removed from his
task force.

The dark side
At home, seemingly without purpose, his life began to spiral out of control as he pursued the things of the world to fill the voids – a professional mixed martial arts career, infidelity, and more. Kathy, his wife, held on as long as she could but eventually gave Chad an ultimatum – choose her and their three children or continue down his destructive path.

He chose the latter, and it only led him to an even darker place. He had tried to blame his problems on others, but now alone, he realized the true problem was the internal war that he hadn’t dealt with. Thinking the solution was to remove himself permanently so he could cause no further harm, he became suicidal, trying to talk himself into taking his own life.

While Chad was in the pit of despair, Kathy, in spite of their separation, continued to pray for Chad, and even forgave him. With divorce papers signed and ready, one final question from Kathy changed everything.

“How is it that everything you do, you accomplish, you achieve, you rise above and beyond,” she asked, “but when it comes to our family, you quit?”

The bright side
Stunned, Chad reevaluated everything.

Subsequently, their story of God’s transformational power is nothing short of amazing. Chad found what he’d been searching for – Jesus, and when he did, he said “the PTSD that was controlling my life, became a set of memories I had control over.”

After a mentorship process to help them overcome their struggles, their church commissioned them and sent them out to begin the Mighty Oaks ministry to America’s military warriors and families.

warrior bibleThe Mighty Oaks Foundation is a faith-based veteran service organization whose stated mission is, “to serve and restore our nation’s warriors and families, who have endured hardship through their service to America, and to help them find a new life purpose through hope in Christ.”

Re-entry into civilian life is difficult and sometimes devastating for combat veterans, often leaving their families to deal with the aftermath of broken homes and even suicide. Mighty Oaks cuts to the heart of the issue through a variety of programs that teach combat veterans victimized by PTSD how to get beyond combat trauma and live their lives in the manner God intended.

Their flagship programs are the Legacy Program For Men and The Legacy Program For Women. The men’s six-day intensive peer-to-peer program seeks to help them discover the answers to the big questions in life, bring to the surface deeply buried struggles, and teach men how to fight through these challenges.

The women’s five-day retreat, for both spouses and military women, hopes to give women a biblical blueprint of womanhood and help each one become the virtuous woman described in Proverbs 31.

Mighty Oaks believes that by helping these heros align their lives to biblical principles, they will be better equipped to lead their families, their communities, and the nation.

According to the U.S. Department of Veteran’s Affairs there are 20 veteran suicides in America every day. Learn more at mightyoaksprograms.org or email info@mightyoaksprograms.org.

 

Judeo-Christian Worldview: Nuclear Family Values and History

Judeo-Christian Worldview:

Nuclear Family Values and History

 

Welcome to Western Culture Dinner Topics!

                LIFE IS FRAGILE. HANDLE WITH PRAYER. Also fragile is the nuclear or traditional family. More than thirty years ago, Christian leaders warned us: Satan has declared war on the family. As I have endeavored to defend the traditional family over the years, I have found this to be true, first hand.

Popular among the many chants of today’s chorus of moral equivalence is: “all variations of the family are essentially equivalent, so why does Western society agonize over the collapse of the family? What’s the big deal? After all, we know this from decades of experimentation.”

Decades, hmm? Really?

                “The bottom line is that not all family structures are equal, and not all variations are compatible with basic social and human needs,” William J. Bennett, eminent author and champion of moral values reminds us. This he concludes after a profound study of the history of the nuclear family—not of mere decades or scarcely a generation—but of millennia, about three thousand years. Which study is more credible—the one based on whims of instant gratification, or the one with a foundation of time-tested human experience?

“Why? What is the big deal?”

                In their mad scramble for self-fulfillment, comfort, and convenience, adults overlook the greatest victims of their selfishness: children.

                Which family structure best meets the needs of children? “We desperately need to reestablish marriage as an exclusive arrangement between a man and a woman,” Bennett continues. “Marriage, monogamous and freely chosen, must be the institution through which children are conceived and born, loved and disciplined, nurtured and raised. And marital permanence must once again become the ideal to which individuals commit themselves and which they strive to maintain.”

Truths restored from ancient history remain unchanged.

The family is ordained of God. Marriage between man and woman is essential to His eternal plan. Children are entitled to birth within the bonds of matrimony, and to be reared by a father and a mother who honor marital vows with complete fidelity.[1]

           Someone wisely said we study history to “know who we are.” As Paul told the Romans, “we are children of God.” Knowing that our Heavenly Father loves us so much that He sent His Son to rescue us from the misery of sin, we can safely conclude that God approves of the family unit, and that “happiness in family life is most likely to be achieved when founded upon the teachings of the Lord Jesus Christ.”[2]

The nuclear family is not the result of mere happenstance. “Shaped as we are by long human experience, we must be all the more careful not to lose what has required so much time and so much effort to accomplish. The modern nuclear family is a rare construct; we tamper with its essentials at our peril. As the long record of human experimentation attests, civilizations, even great civilizations, are more fragile and perishable than we think.” (Bennett, The Broken Hearth, 67, 70)

To forever families,

Christine Davidson

Teach your family the Key to Survival in a Difficult World

 

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Electoral College Facts: Electoral College, Why We Need It to Safeguard our Liberty

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Electoral College Facts: Electoral College, Why We Need It to Safeguard our Liberty Critical Thinking Dinner Topics. As you read this history, watch for: Why there are two houses of Congress Why the Census is important How the Founders insured … Continue reading

History Facts: World War 1 Heroes, American Exceptionalism in History honored by United States Congress

History Facts:

World War 1 Heroes, American Exceptionalism in History honored by United States Congress

Embracing the American’s Creed

By Paul S. Gardiner

It’s a safe bet that most Americans do not know that year 2018 was the 100th anniversary of the adoption of the American’s Creed by the United States Congress (House of Representatives).  In April of 1918, the Congress accepted the words composed in 1917 by William Tyler Page during World War I as the official American’s Creed.

Referring to the Creed, Page said: “It is the summary of the fundamental principles of the American political faith as set forth in its greatest documents, its worthiest traditions, and its greatest leaders.”  His wording of the Creed includes passages and phrases from the Declaration of Independence, the Preamble to the Constitution, Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, and Daniel Webster’s reply to Robert Y. Hayne in the Senate in 1830.  The Creed reads as follows:

I believe in the United States of America as a Government of the people, by the people, for the people; whose just powers are derived from the consent of the governed; a democracy in a Republic; a sovereign Nation of many sovereign States; a perfect Union, one and inseparable; established upon those principles of freedom, equality, justice, and humanity for which American patriots sacrificed their lives and fortunes. I therefore believe it is my duty to my Country to love it; to support its Constitution; to obey its laws; to respect its flag; and to defend it against all enemies.

If today’s politicians, at all levels of government but especially members of the United States Congress, strongly embraced and let the American’s Creed guide their daily actions and decisions, this would certainly be in the best interest of America.  Such a lifestyle should help overcome, hopefully in a major way, the terribly bitter and divisive political environment that presently exists in America.  Americans of all backgrounds and situations need to unite under the banner of the American’s Creed!

Paul S. Gardiner is an avid lover of America living in Hoschton, Ga.  He is a graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of Alabama, and Army War College.