Space Music Spotify Free: Moon Landing Anniversary

Space Music Spotify Free:

Moon Landing Anniversary

Listen to this beautiful, romantic melody about the moon here:
The Moon

July 20th marks the 50th anniversary of the land on the Moon We look outside on a clear night and what may look like a spotlight in the sky is the moon. It is a close companion to the Earth, also known by the Romans as Luna. The Moon is a quarter of the size of the earth. It has also been known as a double planet because of its size. The Moon is 234,000 miles from the Earth and it takes 3 days to get there. The diameter of the Moon is 2,160 miles and a day length is 27.3 Earth days. This is because one side of the Moon permanently faces the earth. For example like a tether ball tied with rope from a pole at the center.

The Moon has no atmosphere and no air making the sky is always black. Because there is no atmosphere there are constant meteor impacts that leave craters as big as 700 miles across. The gravity is 1.6 of earth’s making you lighter to move across the surface with a bounce in your step. If you were to stand on the moon the temperatures are extreme at 270 degree during the day and -240 degrees Fahrenheit at night. The moon causes the rise and fall of the oceans tides. This is caused by the moons gravity pull, which also keeps the orbit of the Earth balanced for its seasons as it goes around the sun.

On July 20th 1969 on the Apollo 11 mission Man for the first time set foot on our cosmic neighbor the moon on the spot known as the Sea of Tranquility. Unfortunately the quote of astronaut Neil Armstrong’s statement has been revised and misquoted saying that there was a dropout in the transmission leaving out the letter “a”. This changes the meaning of the astronaut’s original statement. The original recording is clear.

There is no error in the transmission. The original historic quote is “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind” The astronauts had brought back 48 pounds of Moon rock and dust. Without the Moon the Earth would not stay in balance as it needs to be.

Listen to this beautiful, romantic melody about the moon here:
The Moon

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Space Music: Mars Rover Landing

Space Music:

Mars Rover Landing

All things denote there is a God; yea, even the earth, and all things that are upon the face of it, yea, and its motion, yea, and also all the planets which move in their regular form do witness that there is a Supreme Creator. ~Alma 30:44

 

 

Fake News Detection: History Facts Flashback reveals False Predictions in Weather 2008

Fake News Detection:

History Facts Flashback  reveals False Predictions in Weather 2008

ABC News scorched for ‘wrong’ climate predictions

 

Fake News Detection: Good Morning America played a promo for a special that aired that fall called Earth 2100, and I want to play for you a portion of the promo. Remember, ABC played this in 2008, 11 years ago on Good Morning America…

‘It illustrates just how fear-mongering the entire climate-change crowd is’

 

 

https://www.wnd.com/2019/06/major-network-scorched-for-wrong-climate-predictions/

Rush Limbaugh

RUSH: Our buddies at the Media Research Center went back to their archives and they dragged up (or dragged out) a Good Morning America promo for a climate change special ABC was running back in 2008. Good Morning America played a promo for a special that aired that fall called Earth 2100, and I want to play for you a portion of the promo. Remember, ABC played this in 2008, 11 years ago on Good Morning America… It illustrates just how wrong and fearmongering the entire climate change, global warming (now “extreme weather”) crowd is.

 

PETER GLEICK: (dramatic music) In 2015, we’ve still failed to address the climate problem!

JOHN HOLDREN: We’re going to see more floods, more droughts, more (fire noise) wildfires!

UNIDENTIFIED REPORTER: (channel change sound effect) Flames cover hundreds of square miles.

MAN 1: (storm b-roll noise) We expect more intense hurricanes!

MAN 2: Well, how warm is it going to get? How much will sea level rise? We don’t really know where the end is.

MAN 3: (channel change sound effect) Temperatures have hit dangerous levels.

MAN 4: (channel change sound effect) Agricultural production’s dropping because temperatures are rising!

HEIDI CULLEN: (images of hungry people) There’s about one billion people who are malnourished. That number just continually grows!

TEENAGE BOY: (prediction of the future) It’s June 8th, 2015. One carton of milk is $12.99.

MAN 5: (prediction of the future) Gas has reached over $9 a gallon!

MAN 6: I’m scared (bleep) right now. But I have to get this out.

RUSH: It was a bunch of young people in this ad. They were predicting that by 2015 — four years ago — milk would be 13 bucks a gallon, gasoline over $9 a gallon. The video effects show Manhattan half underwater.

They show very little of Miami left. This was gonna happen by 2015, and this was just a promo for a special that was to run and did run in the fall of 2008 called Earth 2100 — and it’s a good catch, because it illustrates just how wrong and fearmongering the entire climate change, global warming (now “extreme weather”) crowd is.

Flashback 2008: What ABC Predicted Climate Change Would Do by 2015

Socialism Fails again: Green New Deal Vote Results—NO Senate Votes supported it

Socialism Fails again:

Green New Deal Vote Results—NO Senate Votes supported it

Ocasio-Cortez’s ‘Green New Deal’ Fails In Senate. NO Senators Supported It.

By Ryan Saavedra

More A.F. Branco cartoons at FlagAnd Cross.com here.

Socialist Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s (D-NY) “Green New Deal” overwhelmingly failed in the Senate on Tuesday when it was put to a vote, as not a single senator voted in support of it.

“Not a single senator backed her bill during the vote, a 57-0 filibuster,” The Washington Times reported. “Forty-three Democrats voted ‘present,’ refusing to take a stand.”

“Republicans said it was a devastating blow to the democratic socialist movement’s marquee proposal, which called for an upheaval in American energy, overhaul of the construction sector, and the largest expansion in history of the social safety net,” the Times added.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said he was putting the far-left proposal to a vote to see which Democrats supported it.

“The American people will see,” McConnell said before the vote. “They’ll see which senators are so fully committed to radical left-wing ideology that they can’t even vote ‘no’ on self-inflicted economic ruin that would take a sledgehammer to America’s middle class.”

The Times noted that even Democrat Senator Ed Markey, who co-authored the bill with Ocasio-Cortez, did not vote for it.

Ocasio-Cortez responded to the Senate’s rejection of her “Green New Deal” by claiming on Twitter that she told Democratic Senators not to vote for it and to instead vote “present.”

https://www.dailywire.com/news/45143/breaking-ocasio-cortezs-green-new-deal-fails-ryan-saavedra/

Truth in Journalism: Mental Illness, Marijuana and Violence

Truth in Journalism:

Beware of Deception in Media

Mental Illness, Marijuana and Violence

Journalist challenges pot propaganda

April 2019 – In the midst of the movement to legalize marijuana use across America, a huge gap exists between what mental health professionals know and what the general public has been led to believe regarding the harmful effects of pot, according to a veteran journalist and author.

In a January speech at Hillsdale College (hillsdale.edu) in Hillsdale, Michigan, Alex Berenson said that despite a 30-year “shrewd and expensive lobbying campaign” by pot advocates, the media, and some politicians, his research indicates that marijuana use is linked to mental illness and violence.

“Almost everything you think you know about the health effects of cannabis, almost everything advocates and the media have told you for a generation, is wrong,” Berenson said after his research of studies and interviews with psychiatrists and brain scientists.

Among the deceptions that Berenson’s research undermines:

  • Marijuana has many different uses. In reality, put works only in a few narrow conditions.
    Cannabis stems opioid use. In truth marijuana is too weak a painkiller for people who need opiates.
    Pot is safe and a potential treatment for psychiatric problems like depression. Berenson said, “… a mountain of peer-reviewed research in top medical journals shows that marijuana can cause or worsen severe mental illness, especially psychosis… .”

Berenson is the author of Tell Your Children: The Truth About Marijuana, Mental Illness, and Violence.

imprimis.hillsdale.edu, 1/19

Marijuana Facts Parents Need to Know: Mental Illness, Marijuana and Violence, part 2

Marijuana Facts Parents Need to Know:

Mental Illness, Marijuana and Violence

Marijuana, Mental Illness, and Violence

Part 1

Alex Berenson
Author, Tell Your Children: The Truth About Marijuana, Mental Illness, and Violence

Part 2 of 2

Marijuana Health Risk Facts

Far less work has been done on marijuana, in part because advocates have stigmatized anyone who raises the issue. But studies showing that marijuana use is a significant risk factor for violence have quietly piled up. So the black tide of psychosis and the red tide of violence are rising steadily, almost unnoticed, on a slow green wave.

History of Use Patterns → Increased Dangers

Over the past decade, as legalization has spread, patterns of marijuana use—and the drug itself—have changed in dangerous ways.

Legalization has not led to a huge increase in people using the drug casually. About 15 percent of Americans used cannabis at least once in 2017, up from ten percent in 2006, according to a large federal study called the National Survey on Drug Use and Health. (By contrast, about 65 percent of Americans had a drink in the last year.)

But the number of Americans who use cannabis heavily is soaring.

 In 2006, about three million Americans reported using cannabis at least 300 times a year, the standard for daily use. By 2017, that number had nearly tripled, to eight million, approaching the twelve million Americans who drank alcohol every day. Put another way, one in 15 drinkers consumed alcohol daily; about one in five marijuana users used cannabis that often.

Today’s Cannabis 10 X Stronger

Cannabis users today are also consuming a drug that is far more potent than ever before, as measured by the amount of THC—delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the chemical in cannabis responsible for its psychoactive effects—it contains.

  • In the 1970s, the last time this many Americans used cannabis, most marijuana contained less than two percent THC.
  • Today, marijuana routinely contains 20 to 25 percent THC, thanks to sophisticated farming and cloning techniques—as well as to a demand by users for cannabis that produces a stronger high more quickly.
  • In states where cannabis is legal, many users prefer extracts that are nearly pure THC. Think of the difference between near-beer and a martini, or even grain alcohol, to understand the difference.

These new patterns of use have caused problems with the drug to soar.

In 2014, people who had diagnosable cannabis use disorder, the medical term for marijuana abuse or addiction, made up about 1.5 percent of Americans. But they accounted for eleven percent of all the psychosis cases in emergency rooms—90,000 cases, 250 a day, triple the number in 2006. In states like Colorado, emergency room physicians have become experts on dealing with cannabis-induced psychosis.

Neuro-Toxic Effects Not Tracked in US

Cannabis advocates often argue that the drug can’t be as neuro-toxic as studies suggest, because otherwise Western countries would have seen population-wide increases in psychosis alongside rising use. In reality, accurately tracking psychosis cases is impossible in the United States. The government carefully tracks diseases like cancer with central registries, but no such registry exists for schizophrenia or other severe mental illnesses.

On the other hand, research from Finland and Denmark, two countries that track mental illness more comprehensively, shows a significant increase in psychosis since 2000, following an increase in cannabis use. And in September of last year, a large federal survey found a rise in serious mental illness in the United States as well, especially among young adults, the heaviest users of cannabis.

Link to Psychosis?

According to this latter study, 7.5 percent of adults age 18-25 met the criteria for serious mental illness in 2017, double the rate in 2008. What’s especially striking is that adolescents age 12-17 don’t show these increases in cannabis use and severe mental illness.

A caveat: this federal survey doesn’t count individual cases, and it lumps psychosis with other severe mental illness. So it isn’t as accurate as the Finnish or Danish studies. Nor do any of these studies prove that rising cannabis use has caused population-wide increases in psychosis or other mental illness. The most that can be said is that they offer intriguing evidence of a link.

Advocates for people with mental illness do not like discussing the link between schizophrenia and crime. They fear it will stigmatize people with the disease. “Most people with mental illness are not violent,” the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) explains on its website. But wishing away the link can’t make it disappear. In truth, psychosis is a shockingly high risk factor for violence. The best analysis came in a 2009 paper in PLOS Medicine by Dr. Seena Fazel, an Oxford University psychiatrist and epidemiologist. Drawing on earlier studies, the paper found that people with schizophrenia are five times as likely to commit violent crimes as healthy people, and almost 20 times as likely to commit homicide.

NAMI’s statement that most people with mental illness are not violent is of course accurate, given that “most” simply means “more than half”; but it is deeply misleading. Schizophrenia is rare. But people with the disorder commit an appreciable fraction of all murders, in the range of six to nine percent.

“The best way to deal with the stigma is to reduce the violence,” says Dr. Sheilagh Hodgins, a professor at the University of Montreal who has studied mental illness and violence for more than 30 years.

The marijuana-psychosis-violence connection is even stronger than those figures suggest.

 People with schizophrenia are only moderately more likely to become violent than healthy people when they are taking antipsychotic medicine and avoiding recreational drugs. But when they use drugs, their risk of violence skyrockets. “You don’t just have an increased risk of one thing—these things occur in clusters,” Dr. Fazel told me.

Along with alcohol, the drug that psychotic patients use more than any other is cannabis: a 2010 review of earlier studies in Schizophrenia Bulletin found that 27 percent of people with schizophrenia had been diagnosed with cannabis use disorder in their lives.

And unfortunately—despite its reputation for making users relaxed and calm—cannabis appears to provoke many of them to violence.

A Swiss study of 265 psychotic patients published in Frontiers of Forensic Psychiatry last June found that over a three-year period, young men with psychosis who used cannabis had a 50 percent chance of becoming violent. That risk was four times higher than for those with psychosis who didn’t use, even after adjusting for factors such as alcohol use. Other researchers have produced similar findings. A 2013 paper in an Italian psychiatric journal examined almost 1,600 psychiatric patients in southern Italy and found that cannabis use was associated with a ten-fold increase in violence.

The most obvious way that cannabis fuels violence in psychotic people is through its tendency to cause paranoia—something even cannabis advocates acknowledge the drug can cause. The risk is so obvious that users joke about it and dispensaries advertise certain strains as less likely to induce paranoia. And for people with psychotic disorders, paranoia can fuel extreme violence.

A 2007 paper in the Medical Journal of Australia on 88 defendants who had committed homicide during psychotic episodes found that most believed they were in danger from the victim, and almost two-thirds reported misusing cannabis—more than alcohol and amphetamines combined.

Yet the link between marijuana and violence doesn’t appear limited to people with preexisting psychosis. Researchers have studied alcohol and violence for generations, proving that alcohol is a risk factor for domestic abuse, assault, and even murder. Far less work has been done on marijuana, in part because advocates have stigmatized anyone who raises the issue.

 But studies showing that marijuana use is a significant risk factor for violence have quietly piled up.

Many of them weren’t even designed to catch the link, but they did. Dozens of such studies exist, covering everything from bullying by high school students to fighting among vacationers in Spain.

In most cases, studies find that the risk is at least as significant as with alcohol. A 2012 paper in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence examined a federal survey of more than 9,000 adolescents and found that marijuana use was associated with a doubling of domestic violence; a 2017 paper in Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology examined drivers of violence among 6,000 British and Chinese men and found that drug use—the drug nearly always being cannabis—translated into a five-fold increase in violence.

False Claims

Today that risk is translating into real-world impacts. Before states legalized recreational cannabis, advocates said that legalization would let police focus on hardened criminals rather than marijuana smokers and thus reduce violent crime. Some advocates go so far as to claim that legalization has reduced violent crime. In a 2017 speech calling for federal legalization, U.S. Senator Cory Booker said that “states [that have legalized marijuana] are seeing decreases in violent crime.” He was wrong.

The first four states to legalize marijuana for recreational use were Colorado and Washington in 2014 and Alaska and Oregon in 2015.

  • Combined, those four states had about 450 murders and 30,300 aggravated assaults in 2013.
  • Last year, [2018]they had almost 620 murders and 38,000 aggravated assaults—an increase of 37 percent for murders and 25 percent for aggravated assaults, far greater than the national increase, even after accounting for differences in population growth.

Knowing exactly how much of the increase is related to cannabis is impossible without researching every crime. But police reports, news stories, and arrest warrants suggest a close link in many cases. For example, last September, police in Longmont, Colorado, arrested Daniel Lopez for stabbing his brother Thomas to death as a neighbor watched. Daniel Lopez had been diagnosed with schizophrenia and was “self-medicating” with marijuana, according to an arrest affidavit.

In every state, not just those where marijuana is legal, cases like Lopez’s are far more common than either cannabis or mental illness advocates acknowledge.

Child Neglect and Abuse

Cannabis is also associated with a disturbing number of child deaths from abuse and neglect—

Cannabis is also associated with a disturbing number of child deaths from abuse and neglect—many more than alcohol, and more than cocaine, methamphetamines, and opioids combined—according to reports from Texas, one of the few states to provide detailed information on drug use by perpetrators.

Media Ignores Crime Reports

These crimes rarely receive more than local attention. Psychosis-induced violence takes particularly ugly forms and is frequently directed at helpless family members. The elite national media prefers to ignore the crimes as tabloid fodder. Even police departments, which see this violence up close, have been slow to recognize the trend, in part because the epidemic of opioid overdose deaths has overwhelmed them.

So the black tide of psychosis and the red tide of violence are rising steadily, almost unnoticed, on a slow green wave.

***

Cannabis Links to Mental Illness and Violence Known for Centuries

For centuries, people worldwide have understood that cannabis causes mental illness and violence—just as they’ve known that opiates cause addiction and overdose. Hard data on the relationship between marijuana and madness dates back 150 years, to British asylum registers in India.

Yet 20 years ago, the United States moved to encourage wider use of cannabis and opiates.

In both cases, we decided we could outsmart these drugs—that we could have their benefits without their costs. And in both cases we were wrong. Opiates are riskier, and the overdose deaths they cause a more imminent crisis, so we have focused on those. But soon enough the mental illness and violence that follow cannabis use will also be too widespread to ignore.

Choices and Consequences

Whether to use cannabis, or any drug, is a personal decision. Whether cannabis should be legal is a political issue. But its precise legal status is far less important than making sure that anyone who uses it is aware of its risks. Most cigarette smokers don’t die of lung cancer. But we have made it widely known that cigarettes cause cancer, full stop. Most people who drink and drive don’t have fatal accidents. But we have highlighted the cases of those who do.

Need to Warn of Marijuana Health Risk Facts

We need equally unambiguous and well-funded advertising campaigns on the risks of cannabis. Instead, we are now in the worst of all worlds. Marijuana is legal in some states, illegal in others, dangerously potent, and sold without warnings everywhere.

But before we can do anything, we—especially cannabis advocates and those in the elite media who have for too long credulously accepted their claims—need to come to terms with the truth about the science on marijuana.

That adjustment may be painful. But the alternative is far worse, as the patients at Mid-Hudson Forensic Psychiatric Institute—and their victims—know.

How to help prevent drug abuse in your family

 

Marijuana Facts Parents Need to Know: Mental Illness, Marijuana and Violence

Marijuana Facts Parents Need to Know:

Mental Illness, Marijuana and Violence

Marijuana, Mental Illness, and Violence

Alex Berenson
Author, Tell Your Children: The Truth About Marijuana, Mental Illness, and Violence

Part 1 of 2

After an exhaustive review, the National Academy of Medicine found in 2017 that “cannabis use is likely to increase the risk of developing schizophrenia and other psychoses; the higher the use, the greater the risk.” Also that “regular cannabis use is likely to increase the risk for developing social anxiety disorder.”

 

brain on marijuana

Adverse Consequences of Marijuana Use

Acute (present during intoxication)

  • Impaired short-term memory
  • Impaired attention, judgment, and other cognitive functions
  • Impaired coordination and balance
  • Increased heart rate
  • Anxiety, paranoia
  • Psychosis (undetermined)

Persistent (lasting longer than intoxication)

  • Impaired learning and coordination
  • Sleep problems

Long-term (cumulative effects of repeated use)

  • Potential for marijuana addiction
  • Impairments in learning and memory with potential loss of IQ*
  • Increased risk of chronic cough, bronchitis
  • Increased risk of other drug and alcohol use disorders
  • Increased risk of schizophrenia in people with genetic vulnerability**

*Loss of IQ among individuals with persistent marijuana use disorder who began using heavily during adolescence

**These are often reported co-occurring symptoms/disorders with chronic marijuana use.

psychiatric prison

Seventy miles northwest of New York City is a hospital that looks like a prison, its drab brick buildings wrapped in layers of fencing and barbed wire. This grim facility is called the Mid-Hudson Forensic Psychiatric Institute. It’s one of three places the state of New York sends the criminally mentally ill—defendants judged not guilty by reason of insanity.

Until recently, my wife Jackie­—Dr. Jacqueline Berenson—was a senior psychiatrist there. Many of Mid-Hudson’s 300 patients are killers and arsonists. At least one is a cannibal. Most have been diagnosed with psychotic disorders like schizophrenia that provoked them to violence against family members or strangers.

A couple of years ago, Jackie was telling me about a patient. In passing, she said something like, Of course he’d been smoking pot his whole life.

Of course? I said.

Yes, they all smoke.

So marijuana causes schizophrenia?

I was surprised, to say the least. I tended to be a libertarian on drugs. Years before, I’d covered the pharmaceutical industry for The New York Times. I was aware of the claims about marijuana as medicine, and I’d watched the slow spread of legalized cannabis without much interest.

Jackie would have been within her rights to say, I know what I’m talking about, unlike you. Instead she offered something neutral like, I think that’s what the big studies say. You should read them.

So I did. The big studies, the little ones, and all the rest. I read everything I could find. I talked to every psychiatrist and brain scientist who would talk to me. And I soon realized that in all my years as a journalist I had never seen a story where the gap between insider and outsider knowledge was so great, or the stakes so high.

I began to wonder why—with the stocks of cannabis companies soaring and politicians promoting legalization as a low-risk way to raise tax revenue and reduce crime—I had never heard the truth about marijuana, mental illness, and violence.

***

Science of Marijuana’s Dangers

Marijuana Advocacy Groups Deny Historic Facts about Marijuana and Mental Illness

Over the last 30 years, psychiatrists and epidemiologists have turned speculation about marijuana’s dangers into science. Yet over the same period, a shrewd and expensive lobbying campaign has pushed public attitudes about marijuana the other way. And the effects are now becoming apparent.

Almost everything you think you know about the health effects of cannabis, almost everything advocates and the media have told you for a generation, is wrong.

They’ve told you marijuana has many different medical uses. In reality marijuana and THC, its active ingredient, have been shown to work only in a few narrow conditions. They are most commonly prescribed for pain relief. But they are rarely tested against other pain relief drugs like ibuprofen—and in July, a large four-year study of patients with chronic pain in Australia showed cannabis use was associated with greater pain over time.

They’ve told you cannabis can stem opioid use—“Two new studies show how marijuana can help fight the opioid epidemic,” according to Wonkblog, a Washington Post website, in April 2018— and that marijuana’s effects as a painkiller make it a potential substitute for opiates. In reality, like alcohol, marijuana is too weak as a painkiller to work for most people who truly need opiates, such as terminal cancer patients. Even cannabis advocates, like Rob Kampia, the co-founder of the Marijuana Policy Project, acknowledge that they have always viewed medical marijuana laws primarily as a way to protect recreational users.

As for the marijuana-reduces-opiate-use theory, it is based largely on a single paper comparing overdose deaths by state before 2010 to the spread of medical marijuana laws— and the paper’s finding is probably a result of simple geographic coincidence. The opiate epidemic began in Appalachia, while the first states to legalize medical marijuana were in the West. Since 2010, as both the epidemic and medical marijuana laws have spread nationally, the finding has vanished. And the United States, the Western country with the most cannabis use, also has by far the worst problem with opioids.

Research on individual users—a better way to trace cause and effect than looking at aggregate state-level data—consistently shows that marijuana use leads to other drug use. For example, a January 2018 paper in the American Journal of Psychiatry showed that people who used cannabis in 2001 were almost three times as likely to use opiates three years later, even after adjusting for other potential risks.

Most of all, advocates have told you that marijuana is not just safe for people with psychiatric problems like depression, but that it is a potential treatment for those patients. On its website, the cannabis delivery service Eaze offers the “Best Marijuana Strains and Products for Treating Anxiety.” “How Does Cannabis Help Depression?” is the topic of an article on Leafly, the largest cannabis website. But a mountain of peer-reviewed research in top medical journals shows that marijuana can cause or worsen severe mental illness, especially psychosis, the medical term for a break from reality. Teenagers who smoke marijuana regularly are about three times as likely to develop schizophrenia, the most devastating psychotic disorder.

After an exhaustive review, the National Academy of Medicine found in 2017 that “cannabis use is likely to increase the risk of developing schizophrenia and other psychoses; the higher the use, the greater the risk.” Also that “regular cannabis use is likely to increase the risk for developing social anxiety disorder.”

Part 2

***

How to help prevent drug abuse in your family

Gallery

Judeo-Christian Culture: Cosmic Music, a Cosmic Journey into Visions of Creation

This gallery contains 6 photos.

Judeo-Christian Culture: Cosmic Music, a Cosmic Journey into Visions of Creation Music—the universal language. A glimpse into the infinite. A timeless cosmic adventure into both the rugged and the beautiful.   Climbing down to the shore where the huge peak … Continue reading

Political Cartoon: Carbon Tax and Climate Change

Political Cartoon:

Carbon Tax and Climate Change

In their lust to rule their own world, modern liberals long ago decided to cast aside the axioms that constitute absolute truth.

French Fries

After deadly riots, France has scraped it’s “Carbon Tax”. Many leftists are calling for a Carbon tax here in the U.S. but say little as to how that will ultimately lower CO2s. Political Cartoon by A.F. Branco ©2018.

See more Legal Insurrection Branco cartoons, click here.

Climate Chains

Many big government advocates want to use climate change as an excuse to raise huge taxes on its citizens. It’s working so well for France. Political Cartoon by A.F. Branco ©2018.

More A.F. Branco Cartoons at The Daily Torch.

Pro Life Facts: Heartbeat of Baby at 16 days

Pro Life Facts:

Heartbeat of Baby at 16 days

By Thomas Lifson

I must confess that I have never observed the pro-life people who station themselves outside of abortion clinics in an attempt to persuade pregnant women to rethink their impulse to abort. In fact, since I dislike being accosted by strangers, I have had a bit of mental reservation about the practice, even though it puts me in the company of most abortion enthusiasts. They regard such people at pariahs, and succeeded in getting the Supreme Court to agree more than two decades ago to a buffer zone around clinics.

The video embedded below, in a tweet from Live Action, the pro-life group founded by Lila Rose when she was 15 years old, ought to be seen by everyone who has ever wondered about how the process works, and how little information some prospective candidates for abortion have. The mother’s reaction when she learns that her baby has a heartbeat is stunning. That she was inclined to have an abortion without realizing her baby was alive within her is heartbreaking. But that she came to understand this and is reconsidering, is heartwarming.

More information – about the nature of a fetus, and about the alternatives available to women considering abortion – is obviously better than less information. The customary political dodge of abortion supporters, first popularized by Bill Clinton, is that they want abortion to be “safe, legal, and rare.” People who mouth this slogan must support efforts like that depicted in the video. The only people who urge women to have an abortion without this sort of informational intervention must think that abortion itself – the killing of a human life — is a positive good.