Culture Wars: American Family Association, Judeo-Christian Values vs. War on Christianity

Culture Wars:

American Family Association, Judeo-Christian Values vs. War on Christianity

When the fight comes to you

Tim Wildmon

President, American Family Association

Let me challenge you to stay involved with groups like AFA. We will win some and we will lose some. But we can’t quit. We can never give up. What a future America will look like for our children, grandchildren, and Christians in general is very much at stake. ~Tim Wildmon

Truth about America

October 2017 – There is a difference between going looking for a fight and having a fight come to you. It was that way with the colonists who decided to break away from the king of England in the 1700s. Those soon-to-be Americans – the men and women who founded our country – decided they had had enough abuse from the king, and so they made their grievances public with the signing of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776, and the war for America began.

Our founders didn’t go looking for a fight with the British crown, but the provocation for a fight came to them. It is much the same way for those of us who believe in traditional Christian values in modern day America. For the past four decades, we haven’t been looking for a fight, but our beliefs and morals have been under assault. For example:

Honoring God and prayer were very much a part of public life, but then the secularists went against those practices through the courts and many of us felt the need to fight back by forming Christian legal organizations to challenge the atheists and secularists in the courtrooms.
Christian teaching regarding sexual behavior was the standard before Alfred Kinsey, Hugh Hefner, and the entertainment industry (Hollywood) began to attack it relentlessly. Television programming from the 1970s forward has proclaimed there are no rules with respect to sex. Christians saw this as having dire consequences for the long term health of our society and decided to fight back and were mocked for doing so.
The taking of innocent human life through abortion was illegal in most states until the 1973 Roe v Wade Supreme Court decision overruled the states and made abortion the law of the land. Some Christians decided to fight back, and thus was born the pro-life movement.
For all of human history, the definition of marriage has been the union of one man and one woman. The vast majority of states, even liberal California, have reaffirmed this view of marriage in the last 20 years. But one federal judge overruled seven million Californians, and later the Supreme Court concurred, thus changing the legal definition of marriage to include men “marrying” men and women “marrying” women. Talk about a classic oxymoron! Some Christians decided to fight back, and what America will do with this issue remains to be seen.

There are many more examples of what the “culture war” is all about, but I’ve just laid out four of the more high profile issues of our time. These issues were why my dad, Rev. Don Wildmon, founded the American Family Association. He saw the need to give Christians (and others who support traditional values) an organized response to the attacks on the Christian value system. That was in 1977. But we have been backed into a corner and left with no recourse but to fight for our values.

There were other groups like AFA who have also engaged in the effort to preserve and restore these values. The culture war is really a spiritual war; therefore it is eternal. There will

by Carl Bloch

always be good and evil, right and wrong, moral and immoral. And just as these values matter in our personal lives, they also matter for the well-being of our country. If we as a nation continue to rebel against God and godly principles, He will either destroy us or He will allow us to implode. I can’t tell you exactly what that looks like, but judging by historical and biblical accounts, it will be really, really bad.

Challenge to Christian Soldiers

If you are a Christian soldier, let me encourage, warn, and challenge you. Let me encourage you that standing for the Lord and His righteousness is always the right thing to do. We must do what we can, while we can.

Elections matter. Building strong families matters. Being involved in your community matters. Winning converts to Christianity matters. Let me warn you that the world is against us – and sometimes hostile towards us – because we make moral judgments based on Scripture and proclaim them publicly. Jesus told us this would be the case.

Finally, let me challenge you to stay involved with groups like AFA. We will win some and we will lose some. But we can’t quit. We can never give up. What a future America will look like for our children, grandchildren, and Christians in general is very much at stake.

https://afajournal.org/past-issues/2017/october/when-the-fight-comes-to-you/

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Biblical Worldview: Christopher Columbus and the Holy Spirit

Biblical Worldview: Christopher Columbus and the Holy Spirit

Christopher Columbus: Part 2, Book of Faith and Prophecies

Part 1- Epic Hero: Columbus and the Israel Connection

 

by Shirley R. Heater

keycolumbus3… our Lord opened to my understanding (I could sense his hand upon me), so that it became clear to me that it was feasible to navigate from here to the Indies; and he unlocked within me the determination to execute the idea…. Who doubts that this illumination was from the Holy Spirit? I attest that he [the Spirit], with marvelous rays of light, consoled me through the holy and sacred Scriptures…. encouraging me to proceed, and, continually, without ceasing for a moment, they inflame me with a sense of great urgency (Brigham 1991:179).

columbusIn His Own Words
Columbus’s title for what is called his Book of Prophecies, conveys the essence of his vision: Notebook of authorities, statements, opinions and prophecies on the subject of the recovery of God’s holy city and mountain of Zion, and on the discovery and evangelization of the islands of the Indies and of all other peoples and nations. To Ferdinand and Isabella, our hispanic rulers (West and Kling 1991:2,101).

The book is a personal collection of letters, scriptures (from both the Old and New Testaments, as well as the Apocrypha) and quotations from Biblical commentators such as St. Isidore, Rabbi Samuel and St. Augustine, and other sources. It was prepared for the benefit of the King and Queen of Spain to assure them that his mission, and their support, had been a fulfillment of prophecy. Columbus divided his material into four parts. The first is introductory, followed by three sections entitled: “Concerning the Past,” “Concerning the Present and Future” and “Concerning the Future. In the Last Days.”

Columbus compiled this work in 1501-1502 between his third and fourth voyages to the New World, using many handwritten notes as well as marginal notes he had made in books in his personal library. These notes lead West and Kling to conclude that there can be little doubt that Columbus’s systematic study of Bible history and prophecies began at least as early as 1481, concurrently to forming his great plan” (1991:91). Columbus’s Book of Prophecies culminated a lifetime of deep religious conviction and intense scriptural study and interpretation.

columbus4Today the original manuscript resides in Spain in the Biblioteca Colombina at the Cathedral of Seville. In 1894-four hundred years after Columbus’s first voyage to the New World-it was finally published in Spanish. Two translations of Columbus’s Book of Prophecies are now available in English for the first time (Brigham 1991; West and Kling 1991).

Kay Brigham presents a reproduction of the original Latin and Spanish manuscript followed by the English translation; a companion biography is published separately (Brigham 1990). Delno West and August Kling place a transcription of the original text with the English translation on facing pages, introduced by historical/biographical information and commentary. Other writings by Columbus include logs he kept of each of his voyages. His logs have been published many times and are well studied. They reveal a fascinating picture of a man skilled in the “mariner’s arts,” astronomy, geometry, arithmetic, in drafting spherical maps, and drawing “the cities, rivers, mountains, islands and ports”–a man learned in “geographies, histories, chronologies, philosophies and other subjects” (West and Kling 1991:105). Many biographers and historians have focused on his numerous accomplishments in these areas.

However, more significant is his deep spiritual life, knowledge and interpretation of scripture, especially his fervent conviction that he had been chosen by God to fulfill one of the most significant missions in history, a “holy enterprise”-taking the message of Christ to the nations, which would then usher in the return of the Savior.

columbuslandsThe spiritual side of Columbus has been treated as at odds and in conflict with “scientific rationale.” The content of the Book of Prophecies with its emphasis on the spiritual has been virtually ignored or dismissed as “mad ravings,” “delusions,” “bizarre,” an “accute embarrassment “temporary ‘dark and sordid stupor’ … or a clever ploy … to convince the gullible queen that he was ‘the chosen man of destiny to conquer an Other World”‘ (Sale 1990:188-189).

This unbalanced treatment of Columbus is now changing with the English translation of his Book of Prophecies. Restoration Christians, as well as non-Restoration Christians, will find it significant, because “[t]he discovery of America was a triumph of Christianity” (Slater and Adams 1992:2). Many Christians believe that this nation is God’s instrument for taking the gospel to the world, a vision also shared by Columbus.

 

Led by the Holy Spirit
holyspirit
Nephi’s vision in the Book of Mormon clearly shows that “a man among the Gentiles”-Columbus was led by the Holy Spirit to make his voyage of discovery.

And I looked and beheld a man
among the Gentiles which were
separated from the seed of my
brethren by the many waters;
And I beheld the Spirit of God, that it
came down and wrought upon
the man;
And he went forth upon the many
waters, even unto the seed of my
brethren which were in the
promised land.     1 Nephi 3:147

Columbus’s own testimony that he was led by the Holy Spirit was made available in English when Peter Marshall and David Manuel published in their book, The Light and the Glory (1977:17), excerpts from an earlier private translation of the Book of Prophecies by Kling (see also West and Kling 1991:105). Brigham’s recently published translation reads:

… our Lord opened to my understanding (I could sense his hand upon me), so that it became clear to me that it was feasible to navigate from here to the Indies; and he unlocked within me the determination to execute the idea…. Who doubts that this illumination was from the Holy Spirit? I attest that he [the Spirit], with marvelous rays of light, consoled me through the holy and sacred Scriptures…. encouraging me to proceed, and, continually, without ceasing for a moment, they inflame me with a sense of great urgency (Brigham 1991:179).

columbuswglobeColumbus’s “sense of great urgency” is embodied by West and Kling as “his vision.” They characterize him as a “seer” who saw himself as gifted with “spiritual intelligence.” They point out in their introduction that “few know the story of [Columbus’s] vision.” This has led some to propose that because advances in reasoning and technology made the timing ripe, had Columbus not made the voyage someone else would have.

However, West and Kling emphatically disagree with the latter supposition, believing that “one important ingredient was missing: a vision so strong that nothing could deter its holder from the attempt” (West and Kling 1991:3, 22). The timing was ripe for the discovery of the New World however, it was God’s timing. And He selected the man to do the job. Columbus’s vision grew as he gathered numerous scriptural passages, seeing the role of his discovery in their prophetic fulfillment. The vision permeates the most predominant themes of his selections: islands of the sea, hidden lands, ends of the earth, the scattering and gathering of Israel, Zion and Jerusalem. And as we realize that Columbus was moved upon to fulfill his vision in God’s timing, the Book of Mormon also reveals that God’s timing was involved in keeping knowledge of the New World from other nations.

columbus5Hidden Lands
In[ancient American history found in] the Book of Mormon, a Christian prophet named Lehi explains God’s wisdom in keeping their lands hidden:

And behold, it is wisdom that this
land should be kept as yet from
the knowledge of other nations;
For behold, many nations would
overrun this land, that there
would be no place for an inheritance.
Wherefore, I, Lehi, have obtained a
promise,
That inasmuch as they which the
Lord God shall bring out of the
land of Jerusalem shall keep his
commandments,
They shall prosper upon the face of
this land;
And they shall be kept from all other
nations, that they may possess
this land unto themselves.
And if it so be that they shall keep his
commandments, they shall be
blessed upon the face of this land,
And there shall be none to molest
them, nor to take away the land of
their inheritance;
And they shall dwell safely for ever.       2 Nephi 1:16-2

Lehi goes on to say, that when the time comes that “they shall dwindle in unbelief,” i.e., “reject the Holy One of Israel” (vv. 22-23), the Lord would bring judgment upon them and “bring other nations unto them” (vv. 23-24). This calls to mind a particular reference which Columbus included in his Book of Prophecies: “Woe to the land shadowing with wings, which is beyond the rivers of Ethiopia,… a nation meted out and trodden down…” (Isaiah 18:1-2). The “land shadowing with wings” in this Isaiah reference has long been equated by Book of Mormon believers (and others) with the New World because the shape of the North, Central and South American continents resembles a bird with its wings spread. Besides fitting the description, the location of the New World is “beyond the rivers of Ethiopia.”

columbusreachesamerica2Columbus believed that God had kept knowledge of these lands hidden until he–Columbus-was led to make their discovery. He cites such scriptures as Matthew 11:27 [251: “0 Lord … because thou hast hid these things from the wise and prudent and hast revealed them to the little ones” [babes; innocent; i.e., Columbus] (West and Kling 1991:107), and comments, “This I offer on my own behalf, together with the results that one has discovered by personal experience” (West and Kling 1991:109).

Brigham points out that Columbus also saw himself in a poem by a first-century Spanish-Roman writer who prophetically described, “An age will come after many years, when the Ocean will loose the chains of things, and a great land will lie revealed; and a mariner… will discover anew world.” Columbus’s son, Ferdinand, made a marginal note beside Columbus’s copy of the poem which reads, “This prophecy was fulfilled by my father… the Admiral in the year 1492” (Brigham 1990:116).

Lehi prophesied “that there shall be none come into this land save they should be brought by the hand of the Lord” (2 Nephi 1:10). In addition to Columbus, Nephi saw that others would also be brought to the New World.

 

And it came to pass that I beheld the
Spirit of God, that it wrought
upon other Gentiles;
And they went forth out of captivity
upon the many waters;
And I, Nephi, beheld that the Gentiles
which had gone out of captivity
were delivered by the power of
God out of the hands of other
nations.         I Nephi 3:148,155

The other Gentiles which Nephi saw in his vision were most likely the Puritans and Pilgrims who fled their homelands in Europe to find governmental and economic control. God had decreed that this land would be a land of liberty for those who served Jesus Christ (Ether 1:29-35).

 

REFERENCES CITED
Brigham, Kay
1990   Christopher Columbus: His Life
and Discovery in the Light of His
Prophecies.
CLIE Publishers, Terrassa, Barcelona.

1991   Christopher Columbus’s Book of
Prophecies: Reproduction of the Original Manuscript With English
Translation. Quincentenary Edition.
CLIE Publishers, Terrassa, Barcelona.

Judge, Joseph
1986   Where Columbus Found the
New World. National Geographic,
Nov. 1986, pp. 566-599.

Marshall, Peter and David Manual
1977   The Light and the Glory. Revell,
old Tappan, New Jersey.

Sale, Kirkpatrick
1990   The Conquest of Paradise:
Christopher Columbus and the
Columbian Legacy.
Alfred A. Knopf,
New York.

Slater, Rosalie J., and Carole G. Adams, eds.
1992   Principly Speaking, Vol. 2, No. 2.
foundation for American Christian
Education, San Francisco.

West, Delno C. and August Kling
1991  The Libro de las profecias of
Christopher Columbus: An en face
edition. Vol. 2, Columbus
Quincentenary Series, University of
Florida Press, Gainesville.

This article taken from the Zarahemla Record, issue 63 Sept/Oct 1992

Bible Study

 

 

 

History Heroes: Columbus and the Israel Connection

Dinner Topics for Columbus Day

Christopher Columbus—the History Hero who revived Judeo-Christian heritage in America

History Facts

Columbus and the Connection to house of Israel

keyLittle known is the fact that Columbus may have been a convert from Judaism to Christianity, and that he sought to gather the lost tribes of Israel to the fold of Jesus Christ.

Columbus Day, October 12, has been observed as an official U.S. holiday since 1934. The year 1992, marked the five-hundredth anniversary of Columbus’s first landfall in the New World.

columbus5Since then, many of the epic stories that make up our great American history have been purged from the schools. The rising generation is growing to adulthood with little or no knowledge of their rich heritage of liberty and their Judeo-Christian roots. October 12, if observed, no longer has much to do with the far-reaching significance of Columbus’ discovery. Like the birthdays of Washington and Lincoln, Columbus Day is being overshadowed these days by the new state religion: Islam.

Even those who did study some basic history during the 20th century, however, did not have the opportunity to know the epic hero who was Christopher Columbus. Little known is the fact that Columbus may have been a convert from Judaism to Christianity, and that he sought to gather the lost tribes of Israel to the fold of Jesus Christ. Following are excerpts from an article by Shirley Heater which documents inspiring facts about this nearly-forgotten hero. Truly this is a story to save in your personal “Treasury of Epic Stories”, to pass on to your children and grandchildren.

Christopher Columbus: Man of Vision and Faith

by Shirley R. Heater

Was the discovery made by accident, or was Columbus led by God? The Book of Mormon says he was led by the Holy Spirit, and now we have confirmation of this in Columbus’s own words, as well as additional new insights. An authentic Columbus manuscript has gone virtually unexamined until recent years. In Columbus’s Book of Prophecies, translated into English in 1991, he provides his own answers about Divine influence in his accomplishments.
Christopher Columbus, as he is known to English speakers, was born Christopher Colombo in the seaport of Genoa, Italy, in 1451.
His sailing career began when he was about 13 or 14 years old. He became a skilled seaman and navigator on merchant ships which traveled the Mediterranean Sea. In 1476, he joined his brother Bartholomew in the Portugal city of Lisbon, where they worked together on map-making. His Portuguese name was Cristovao Colom.

During his eight years in Lisbon, Columbus expanded his sailing experience into the Atlantic Ocean. He married, became the father of a son, Diego, and shortly thereafter was widowed. It was also during this period that his “vision” of sailing to new lands and saving lost souls germinated. He sought backing for his proposed venture from King John II of Portugal who turned him down.

columbusreachesamerica2Undaunted, he went to the port city of Palos de la Frontera in Spain, taking his young son with him. They were befriended by the friars of the monastery at La Rabida and then at Las Cuevas in Seville, who embraced and encouraged his ideas. His name took on the Spanish form, Cristobal Colon.

The magnitude of his intended enterprise soon opened the doors to Queen Isabella and King Ferdinand. Their interest did not wane even though other matters kept them from following through with their approval for seven years.

During that prolonged period, he made his home in Cordoba (Cordova) where he met a young woman who became the mother of his second son, Ferdinand. [Note: He is still known throughout the Spanish-speaking world as Cristobal Colon Christopher Columbus, the English form, comes to us by way of the early colonists. Whatever the version of his name–Cristoforo, Cristovao, Cristobal or Christopher–the meaning is the same: “Christ bearer” (Sale 1990: 254n)].

Isaiah and the Isles of the Sea
 
Columbus and Nephi [from the Book of Mormon] had special regard for Isaiah, the Old Testament prophet most often quoted or referred to in both Columbus’s Book of Prophecies and the Book of Mormon. More intriguing is the fact that Nephi and Columbus selected the same portions of Isaiah and that each saw himself fulfilling those prophecies.

The Book of Mormon identifies the seed of Lehi as a remnant, a branch broken off which will be restored to the knowledge of their covenant and their Redeemer (e.g., 1 Nephi 4:15-17). Nephi and his brother, Jacob, are the only Book of Mormon writers who crossed the ocean, and they uniquely view their promised land as an island. Nephi, who delighted in the words of Isaiah (2 Nephi 11:8), “likened” them to his people (2 Nephi 8:3) in their literal fulfillment.
When Columbus was led to the “isles of the sea,” the door was opened to the lands occupied by the remnant of the Book of Mormon people. This set events in motion for the eventual restoration of the knowledge of the covenants.

columbuslandingLost Tribes and Other Sheep

Through Columbus’s writings, it is obvious that he fully expected to find the lost tribes of Israel (Wiesenthal 1973:61). He saw himself as “Christ-bearer” (the meaning of his name Christopher), God’s messenger to bring a knowledge of the Savior to the lost tribes
Particularly noteworthy is Columbus’s inclusion of John 10:16 in his Book of Prophecies: “I have other sheep that are not of this sheep pen [fold], and I must bring them also; they will hear my voice, and there shall be one flock and one shepherd” (Brigham 1991:264-265). It is with great foresight that he believed that the “flock” would not just be “Israel after the flesh” but that a “spiritual Israel” would be formed of all who would come to Christ (208-209).

When Jesus visited Lehi’s descendants, he told them that they were the other sheep of which he had spoken and that he had still other sheep (3 Nephi 7:20, 24-26). He also told them that those Gentiles who repented would also be numbered among his people (v. 37). There are specific promises in the Book of Mormon to restore the Lamanites to “the knowledge of their Redeemer, … and be numbered among his sheep” which are yet to be fulfilled (Helaman 5:104). This restoration was set in motion when Columbus was led to the New World, followed by Gentiles who brought the “record of the Jews” 0 Nephi 3:155-161). It will culminate when they receive the Book of Mormon and the two books “grow together” (2 Nephi 2:17-23).

The Jewish Connection 

columbuslandsWas Columbus Jewish? There are several proponents of Columbus’s Jewish heritage, with varying viewpoints. Some believe “What there is abundant circumstantial evidence that Columbus was of a Jewish background, at least on one side of the family” (Fuson 1987:16).
The description of Columbus in the Book of Mormon as “a man among the Gentiles” could be interpreted either as a Jew or a Gentile (1 Nephi 3:145).

Columbus is seen either as a converso, a converted Jew (Madariaga 1949:54-65,119-135), or a marrano, a professing Christian who was still a secretly-practicing Jew (Wiesenthal 1973:124-133). Whether or not he was of Jewish ancestry is an interesting proposition. Columbus’s writings are abundantly interwoven with professions of faith and belief in Jesus Christ as his Savior (Brigham 1991:179-181), and he affirms his faith in a letter to the king and queen of Spain (182-183):

Columbus’s mission was permeated with a “Jewish flavor.” Many Jews supported his venture, providing maps, instruments and finances. Many crew members are believed to have been Jewish. In anticipation of finding the lost tribes on his first voyage, Columbus took along a converso, Luis de Torres, an experienced interpreter who “knew how to speak Hebrew, Chaldean, and even some Arabic” (Fusan 1987:100-101).

columbusUpon arrival in the New World, Hebrew was probably spoken in an attempt to communicate with the natives. In the log of his first voyage, Columbus linked the beginning of his voyage to America (early morning of August 3rd) and the expulsion of all professing Jews from Spain (effective at midnight of August 2nd) (Fusan 1987:52). The Jewish people were hopeful of finding a new place of refuge (Wiesenthal 1973:88). The New World was to become a haven for Jews and a new promised land. In fact, the first refugees came in the late fifteenth century; many were marranos (Sachar 1992:10).

Columbus also desired to free Jerusalem from the Muslims and restore the Holy Land to the Church. This could only be financed by discovering new lands and gathering enough gold, silver and precious stones (Fusan 1987:34). However, he knew that his desire to bring freedom to the people of the Old Testament could ultimately come only through their conversion to Jesus Christ.

Part 2: Columbus, Prophecy, and the Holy Spirit

YouTube Video: Classical Music and Verdi

Dinner Topics for Friday

The earth shall be full of the knowledge of the Lord, as the waters cover the sea. ~Isaiah 11:9

Triumphal March from “Aida”

From Wikipedia

Giuseppe Fortunino Francesco Verdi (10 October 1813 – 27 January 1901) was an Italian Romantic composer, mainly of opera. Musically, he was part of European Romanticism, and was one of the most influential composers of the 19th century. His works are frequently performed in opera houses throughout the world and, transcending the boundaries of the genre, some of his themes have long since taken root in popular culture – such as “La donna è mobile” from Rigoletto, “Va, pensiero” (The Chorus of the Hebrew Slaves) from Nabucco, “Libiamo ne’ lieti calici” (The Drinking Song) from La traviata and the “Grand March” from Aida.

Chorus of the Hebrew Slaves

Verdi’s masterworks dominate the standard opera repertoire a century and a half after their composition.

Early life

Verdi was born the son of Carlo Giuseppe Verdi and Luigia Uttini in Le Roncole, a village near Busseto, then in the Département Taro which was a part of the First French Empire after the annexation of the Duchy of Parma and Piacenza. The baptismal register, on 11 October lists him as being “born yesterday”, but since days were often considered to begin at sunset, this could have meant either 9 or 10 October. The next day, he was baptized in the Roman Catholic Church in Latin as Joseph Fortuninus Franciscus. The day after that (Tuesday), Verdi’s father took his newborn the three miles to Busseto, where the baby was recorded as Joseph Fortunin François; the clerk wrote in French. “So it happened that for the civil and temporal world Verdi was born a Frenchman.”[1]

When he was still a child, Verdi’s parents moved from Piacenza to Busseto, where the future composer’s education was greatly facilitated by visits to the large library belonging to the local Jesuit school. Also in Busseto, Verdi was given his first lessons in composition.

Verdi went to Milan when he was twenty to continue his studies. He took private lessons in counterpoint while attending operatic performances, as well as concerts of, specifically, German music. Milan’s beaumonde association convinced him that he should pursue a career as a theatre composer. During the mid 1830s, he attended the Salotto Maffei salons in Milan, hosted by Clara Maffei.

Returning to Busseto, he became the town music master and, with the support of Antonio Barezzi, a local merchant and music lover who had long supported Verdi’s musical ambitions in Milan, Verdi gave his first public performance at Barezzi’s home in 1830.

Because he loved Verdi’s music, Barezzi invited Verdi to be his daughter Margherita’s music teacher, and the two soon fell deeply in love. They were married on 4 May 1836 and Margherita gave birth to two children, Virginia Maria Luigia (26 March 1837 – 12 August 1838) and Icilio Romano (11 July 1838 – 22 October 1839). Both died in infancy while Verdi was working on his first opera and, shortly afterwards, Margherita died of encephalitis[2][3] on 18 June 1840, aged only 26.[4] Verdi adored his wife and children, and he was devastated by their untimely deaths.

Middle years

Sometime in the mid-1840s, after the death of Margherita Barezzi, Verdi began an affair with Giuseppina Strepponi, a soprano in the twilight of her career.[7] Their cohabitation before marriage was regarded as scandalous in some of the places they lived, but Verdi and Giuseppina married on 29 August 1859 at Collonges-sous-Salève, near Geneva.[8] While living in Busseto with Strepponi, Verdi bought an estate two miles from the town in 1848. Initially, his parents lived there, but, after his mother’s death in 1851, he made the Villa Verdi at Sant’Agata in Villanova sull’Arda his home until his death.

As the “galley years” were drawing to a close, Verdi created one of his greatest masterpieces, Rigoletto, which premiered in Venice in 1851. Based on a play by Victor Hugo (Le roi s’amuse), the libretto had to undergo substantial revisions in order to satisfy the epoch’s censorship, and the composer was on the verge of giving it all up a number of times. The opera quickly became a great success.

With Rigoletto, Verdi sets up his original idea of musical drama as a cocktail of heterogeneous elements, embodying social and cultural complexity, and beginning from a distinctive mixture of comedy and tragedy. Rigoletto’s musical range includes band-music such as the first scene or the song La donna è mobile, Italian melody such as the famous quartet “Bella figlia dell’amore”, chamber music such as the duet between Rigoletto and Sparafucile and powerful and concise declamatos often based on key-notes like the C and C# notes in Rigoletto and Monterone’s upper register.

There followed the second and third of the three major operas of Verdi’s “middle period”: in 1853 Il Trovatore was produced in Rome and La traviata in Venice. The latter was based on Alexandre Dumas, fils‘ play The Lady of the Camellias, and became the most popular of all Verdi’s operas, placing first in the Operabase list of most performed operas worldwide.[9]

Later compositions

VerdiBetween 1855 and 1867, an outpouring of great Verdi operas followed, among them such repertory staples as Un ballo in maschera (1859), La forza del destino (commissioned by the Imperial Theatre of Saint Petersburg for 1861 but not performed until 1862), and a revised version of Macbeth (1865). Other somewhat less often performed include Les vêpres siciliennes (1855) and Don Carlos (1867), both commissioned by the Paris Opera and initially given in French. Today, these latter two operas are most often performed in their revised Italian versions. Simon Boccanegra followed in 1857. Verdi’s grand opera, Aida, is sometimes thought to have been commissioned for the celebration of the opening of the Suez Canal in 1869, but, according to one major critic,[10] Verdi turned down the Khedive’s invitation to write an “ode” for the new opera house he was planning to inaugurate as part of the canal opening festivities. The opera house actually opened with a production of Rigoletto. Later in 1869/70, the organizers again approached Verdi (this time with the idea of writing an opera), but he again turned them down. When they warned him that they would ask Charles Gounod instead and then threatened to engage Richard Wagner‘s services, Verdi began to show considerable interest, and agreements were signed in June 1870.

Verdi and Wagner, who were the leaders of their respective schools of music, seemed to resent each other greatly. They never met. Verdi’s comments on Wagner and his music are few and hardly benevolent (“He invariably chooses, unnecessarily, the untrodden path, attempting to fly where a rational person would walk with better results”), but at least one of them is kind: upon learning of Wagner’s death, Verdi lamented, “Sad, sad, sad! … a name that will leave a most powerful impression on the history of art.”[11] Of Wagner’s comments on Verdi, only one is well-known. After listening to Verdi’s Requiem, the German, prolific and eloquent in his comments on some other composers, stated, “It would be best not to say anything.”

Final years and death

Otello, based on William Shakespeare‘s play, with a libretto written by the younger composer of Mefistofele, Arrigo Boito, premiered in Milan in 1887. Its music is “continuous” and cannot easily be divided into separate “numbers” to be performed in concert. Some[who?] feel that although masterfully orchestrated, it lacks the melodic lustre so characteristic of Verdi’s earlier, great, operas, while many critics consider it Verdi’s greatest tragic opera, containing some of his most beautiful, expressive music and some of his richest characterizations. In addition, it lacks a prelude, something Verdi listeners are not accustomed to. Arturo Toscanini performed as cellist in the orchestra at the world premiere and began his friendship with Verdi (a composer he revered as highly as Beethoven).

Verdi’s statue in the Piazza G. Verdi, Busseto

Verdi’s last opera, Falstaff, whose libretto was also by Boito, was based on Shakespeare’s Merry Wives of Windsor and Victor Hugo‘s subsequent translation. It was an international success and is one of the supreme comic operas which shows Verdi’s genius as a contrapuntist.

Verdi was initially buried in Milan’s Cimitero Monumentale. A month later, his body was moved to the Casa di Riposo per Musicisti, a rest home for retired musicians that Verdi had established. In October 1894, the French government awarded him the Grand-Croix de la Legion d’honneur.[citation needed] He was the first musician to receive the Grand-Croix.[citation needed]

He was an agnostic. Toscanini, in a taped interview, described him as “an atheist”, but “agnostic” is probably the most accurate description. His second wife, Giuseppina Strepponi, described him as “a man of little faith”. [15]

Complete article

Truth about Las Vegas Shooting: Gun Facts; Media Fact Check

Truth about Las Vegas Shooting:

Gun Facts; Media Fact Check

Media Fact Check:

Known Facts about Las Vegas Shooter

Sara Gonzales

Since the deadly shooting in Las Vegas that left at least 59 people dead and another 527 injured, there have been several conflicting news reports about the gunman, 64-year-old Stephen Paddock. Some of these stories were even promoted by top websites like Google and Facebook.

Here’s a look at what’s true about the shooter, based on what we know so far.

Fact

Update:

Paddock prescribed drug linked to violent outbursts

Use of anti-anxiety medication can sometimes trigger aggressive behavior, psychotic experiences

Gun Facts

Rush Limbaugh

RUSH: Hey. Let me ask you a question, couple questions. Has your pencil, when you’ve been writing or your pen ever misspelled a word? No, no, I’m just asking. Has your car ever driven drunk? Well, depending on the way SUV accidents are covered, for a while there when they were trying to demonize ’em, the media did treat SUVs as though they had minds of their own.

SUVs were driving off parking garage roofs. SUVs were killing their drivers ’cause SUVs were evil to climate change. Did your fork make you fat?
Didn’t happen, did it? The pencil didn’t misspell a word. The fork didn’t make you fat. And your car never hit a fire hydrant drunk. Ask Tiger Woods. But yet guns are killing people. Well, I’m just sharing with you the kind of logic you get in the town of Realville, where I, your host, am the mayor.

Here Are 5 Reasons The Media Focus On Mass Shootings. It’s Misleading To Do So.

Ben Shapiro

Daily Wire

  1. Mass Shootings Cannot Be Confined By Location. The vast bulk of gun homicides in the United States take place in major cities that trend blue. As Harry Moroz of Next American City calculated in 2012, “Based on the CDC data, almost 60% of US firearm homicides occur in the 62 cities of the country’s 50 largest metros.” Gun control is quite common in those areas.
  2. The Type Of Gun In Mass Shootings Differs Radically From Gun Homicides Overall. According to FBI statistics, the vast majority of gun-related homicides involve handguns, not long guns (in 2012, for example, only 322 people were killed with a rifle of any sort, as opposed to thousands by handgun). But the Left doesn’t want to openly talk about banning handguns, since they are significantly more common and more popular than long guns. The “assault weapons ban” sounds more plausible in the context of mass shootings than in the context of overall American gun homicide.
  3. The Evidence For Gun Control Is Strongest On Mass Shootings. There is little correlative evidence between gun homicide and gun ownership. The states in America with high gun ownership rates evidence no elevated level of gun homicide compared with those with lower rates of gun ownership.
  4. The Bulk Of Gun-Related Deaths In America Are Suicides. While the media focus incessantly on gun homicide, which has been dropping steadily for years (at least until the advent of the Ferguson effect), the bulk of gun-related deaths in the United States are suicides. The media routinely obscure this fact, because it might remind people that guns don’t shoot people all by themselves.
  5. Mass Shootings Are Often Perpetrated By The Mentally Ill. This means that we tend to blame society rather than individuals. When criminals commit crimes, we tend to blame them for their criminality; when the mentally ill commit horrific acts of violence, it’s easier to blame society more broadly, which tends to call for public policy change.

Focusing on mass shootings makes some sense because they are the most visible shootings; because they don’t specifically create individual moral culpability thanks to mental illness concerns; because their small sample size allows politicians to attribute any sort of decline to changes in public policy. But it’s a mistake to make policy for precisely those reasons.

 

Truth about Las Vegas Shooting: Mass Shootings, Mind Altering Drugs and Radicalization

Truth about Las Vegas Shooting:

UPDATE:

Paddock prescribed drug linked to violent outbursts

Use of anti-anxiety medication can sometimes trigger aggressive behavior, psychotic experiences

Dr. Michael First, a clinical psychiatry professor at Columbia University and expert on benzodiazepines, contended Paddock’s attack was clearly premeditated, but acknowledged diazepam “fuels aggression.”

“What this man in Las Vegas did was very planned,” he told the Review-Journal.
But the truth about mass shootings and psychiatric drugs is being swept under the rug by the media. Corporate media outlets face a major conflict of interests by exposing big pharma corruption.

Mass Shootings, Mind Altering Drugs and Radicalization

“When an Islamic terrorist blows up a school with kids in it, we are told not to judge all Muslims by the acts of a few,” said Sen. John Kennedy, R-La. “And I agree with that. So why do we want to judge all 80 million gun owners in America because of the acts of one perverted idiot? I don’t know what else to call him. I don’t think our problem in America is gun laws. I think criminals obey gun laws like politicians keep promises.”

2 lethal traits of America’s deadliest mass shooters

Alicia Powe

Instead of jumping on the anti-gun bandwagon in the wake of the Las Vegas massacre, concerned Americans might be better served by turning their attention to what the nation’s deadliest mass shooters have in common.

There’s no escaping the two lethal traits shared by almost every single one of them …

Over the last 20 years, the perpetrators of nearly all the deadliest mass shooting in the United States have shared one of two traits: Besides killing innocents with firearms, they either were Muslims or were using mind-altering psychiatric drugs.

Stephen Craig Paddock is alleged to have opened fire from a 32nd-floor hotel room on a crowd of more than 22,000 gathered for a country music festival Sunday night, killing at least 59 people and injuring at least 515 others, making it the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history.

Paddock’s brother, Eric Paddock, revealed Monday that their father, Patrick Benjamin Paddock, was a bank robber who escaped prison and was on the FBI’s Most Wanted list. The elder Paddock was “diagnosed as psychopathic” and “reportedly had suicidal tendencies.”

  1. James Hodgkinson, congressional baseball practice (2017):

Hodgkinson, a Bernie Sanders supporter who reportedly “hated Republicans,” opened fired at a GOP congressional baseball practice on June 14, wounding Rep. Steve Scalise, R-La., two Capitol Police officers and one congressional staffer.Timothy Slater, special agent in charge of the FBI’s Washington Field Office, revealed that Hodgkinson was taking prescription drugs, but he did not disclose what the drugs were for or whether he was abusing them.

  1. Esteban Santiago-Ruiz, Fort Lauderdale airport (2017):

Santiago-Ruiz shot five people to death and injured six others in Fort Lauderdale’s Hollywood International Airport Jan. 7, 2017, near the baggage claim.

Relatives said he had been receiving psychological treatment.

The Fort Lauderdale shooter was also reportedly speaking to online jihadists and practicing shooting his pistol for months before he opened fire.

  1. Omar Mateen, Orlando, Florida, Pulse nightclub (2016): 49 killed

It is being widely reported in the media that Mateen had bipolar disorder. His ex-wife, Sitora YuSufi, says Mateen claimed he was bipolar.

  1. Rizwan Farook and Tashfeen Malik, San Bernardino (2015): 14 killed

A newlywed couple, U.S. citizen Rizwan Farook and his Pakistani wife Tashfeen Malik, who was a permanent resident, left their 6-month-old baby with a grandmother while they stormed a holiday party at the Inland Regional Center in San Bernardino, California, killing 14 people and injuring 22 others.

Former FBI Director James Comey concluded that Farook and Malik were radicalized and likely inspired by foreign terrorist organizations.

  1. Adam Lanza, Sandy Hook (2012): 26 killed

A 20-year-old American citizen, Lanza killed his mother in December 2012 before shooting and killing 20 children and six adults at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut. He later committed suicide.

According to the website AbleChild, Paul Fox, the psychiatrist who treated Lanza was arrested for sexual misconduct and charged with three felony counts of sexual assault on a then-19-year-old patient for distributing the victim a “dynamic cocktail of psychiatric drugs” and for questionable billing practices and patient records retention.

It is unclear what psychiatric diagnoses or what kind of psychiatric “dynamic cocktail” Lanza was prescribed while a patient under Fox’s “care” because the state of Connecticut refuses to release Lanza’s mental health records or autopsy and toxicology results.

Fox told detectives who were investigating the Sandy Hook massacre in 2012 that he had little memory of Lanza and destroyed any records he had of his treatment of Lanza prior to 2012.

  1. Seung-Hui Cho Virginia Tech (2007): 32 killed

Cho, a 23-year-old student and South Korean national, went on a rampage at Virginia Tech University in April 2007, killing 27 students and five teachers before committing suicide.

The New York Times has reported the killer was on a prescription medication, and authorities said he was confined briefly several years before the attack for a mental episode.

  1. Nidal Hasan, Fort Hood military base (2009): 13 killed

After jumping up on a desk and shouting “Allahu akbar,” U.S. Army psychiatrist Nidal Hasan opened fire and sprayed more than 100 bullets inside a crowded building where troops were preparing to deploy to Afghanistan in November 2009. He killed 13 people and injuring 42 others.

Hasan reportedly was disciplined prior to the shootings for pushing his beliefs on others. His business card carried an abbreviation for “Soldier of Allah.”

  1. James Holmes, Aurora, Colorado (2012): 12 killed

Holmes, a U.S. citizen born in California and a graduate student in neuroscience, stormed a movie theater airing a late-night premiere of a “Batman” film in Aurora, Colorado, in July 2012. He was wearing body armor when he opened fire and released tear gas.

Holmes was using two mind-altering psychiatric drugs during the night of the shooting, including the antidepressant Sertaline, generically known as Zoloft.

Zoloft has an FDA “black box” warning, the strongest warning the agency issues, cautioning that the drug can increase the risk of suicidal thoughts and behavior. Other dangerous side effects of Zoloft include agitation, irritability, anxiety, hostility, aggressiveness, hallucinations, mania, impulsivity, delusions and apathy.

Holmes was also on Klonopin, a drug that was initially designed to treat epileptic seizures by lowering electoral activity in the brain. It shares the same side effects of Zoloft but also can reportedly cause unpredictable reactions in people.

  1. Jiverly Antares Wong, New York immigrant center: 13 killed

A Vietnamese immigrant, Jiverly Antares Wong, shot and killed 13 people at an upstate New York immigration center in April 2009 before killing himself.

Wong displayed had no history of mental illness, but a letter he sent to a Syracuse television station revealed he was harboring a growing paranoia. Just before his killing spree, Wong sent a two-page delusional rant to the TV station saying the police were spying on him, sneaking into his home and trying to get into car accidents with him.

  1. Aaron Alexis, Navy Yard headquarters (2013): 12 killed

Alexis, a 34-year-old information technology employee at a defense-related computer company, used a valid pass in September 2013 to get into the Navy Yard and then opened fire for more than a half hour, killing 12 people before he was slain by police in the shootout.

U.S. law enforcement found no evidence to suggest Alexis’ motive was political or religious.

Alexis never sought care from a mental health specialist. He was never declared mentally ill by a judge or committed to a hospital, according to the Veteran Affairs medical centers.

But less than a month before Alexis went on the shooting rampage, he visited U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs medical centers twice, seeking treatment for insomnia. He was given medication to help him sleep, but when asked by doctors, he denied having thoughts about harming himself or others.

In August 2013, the former member of the Navy Reserve complained to Rhode Island police that people were talking to him through the walls and ceiling of his hotel rooms and sending microwave vibrations into his body to deprive him of sleep.

  1. Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold Columbine High (1999): 12 killed

Harris and Klebold, two American teenage boys, shot and killed 12 classmates and a teacher, wounding 26 others before killing themselves at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado, in April 1999.

Harris was reportedly rejected by Marine Corps recruiters days before the Columbine High School massacre because he was under a doctor’s care and had been prescribed antidepressant medications Luvox, Prozac, Paxil, Zoloft and Effexor, which he was on at the time he opened fire at Columbine High School.

Klebold’s medical records remain sealed, but at least one public report exists of a Klebold friend witnessing him take the antidepressants Paxil and Zoloft.

  1. George Hennard, Texas restaurant (1991): 22 killed

In October 1991, 35-year-old Hennard, a U.S citizen, shot dead 22 people in a restaurant in the town of Killeen before shooting himself.

Hennard had suffered from a paranoid personality disorder, and experts said he was at “the very border of mental illness.”

 

 

 

History Facts: Socialism Failure; Truth about Immigration; Truth about Black Lives Matter

History Facts:

Socialism Failure; Truth about Immigration; Truth about Black Lives Matter

The Left needs the disinfectant of truth. ~Dinesh D’Souza

Trump Speech to the UN:

Socialism Failure 

THE PRESIDENT: The problem in Venezuela is not that socialism has been poorly implemented, but that socialism has been faithfully implemented. From the Soviet Union to Cuba to Venezuela, wherever true socialism or communism has been adopted, it has delivered anguish and devastation and failure. Those who preach the tenets of these discredited ideologies only contribute to the continued suffering of the people who live under these cruel systems.

Rush Limbaugh

The reason why this speech has caused such a reaction, and you might think, “Rush, it’s obvious.” Yeah, but it needs to be stated. Reality is much more compelling than narrative. Hard, cold truths, honest, uplifting truths, whatever kind of truths are far more valuable, far more long-lasting, and far more compelling than spin, than narratives, than the usual say-nothing diplomacy for which there is always endless plaudits.

The United Nations is the best illustration I can think of that the main problem in the world is the unequal distribution of freedom, the unequal distribution of capitalism, the overdistribution of socialism and communism. But the fact the United States has been among the greatest forces for good in the history of the world is self-evident. It’s as self-evident as the value of the combustion engine, internal combustion engine.

 

He reminded them of the disproportionate share of costs, i.e., dues that the United States has incurred, and he said that that unfair burden would be a good deal if the United States served its stated purpose. But it doesn’t. It was a tour de force, ladies and gentlemen, for liberty and for freedom, ordered liberty, not dictators, not bureaucracies, and other groups of assorted elitists.

And it was delivered directly to members of the United Nations, many of whom reject every principle that Trump laid out. Slammed socialism, targeted rogue regimes, threatened to destroy “Rocket Man” and North Korea. And, by the way, there was considerable applause when he was tearing into Iran and the Iranian nuclear deal.

Trump laid into the soft war on ISIS. He said, “In fact, our country’s achieved more against ISIS in the latest eight months than it has in many, many years combined.” That’s not reported. People may not know how true that is. Trump laid into dictators. And the camera caught real-time reactions among the dictators as Trump was laying into them. They were a captive audience, and Trump took advantage.

‘We Will Stop Radical Islamic Terrorism’

Truth About Immigration

Trump Tweets: End Chain Migration

Survey: Americans Want Refugee Resettlement Cut to 25K or Less Annually

Truth About Black Lives Matter

Black Lives Matter Leader: What I Experienced At Pro-Trump Rally ‘Restored My Faith In Some Of These People’

Moral Values: Normal American Culture equals Bourgeois Values

Moral Values:

 Normal American Culture equals Bourgeois  Values

Normal American Culture

Rush Limbaugh

Here’s a pull quote: “Who are the normals? The Americans who built this country, and defended it. When you eat, it’s because a normal grew the food and another normal trucked it to you. When you aren’t murdered in the street or don’t speak German, it’s because a normal with a gun made those things not happen. We normals don’t want to rule over others. We don’t obsess about how you live your life, but also we don’t want to be compelled to signal our approval or pick up the tab. We are every color and creed — though when someone who is incidentally a member of some other group aligns with normals, he/she/xe loses that identity.

“The left drums normals who are black out of its definition of ‘black,’ just as normal women get drummed out of womanhood and normal gays get drummed out gayhood. In a way, the left is making E pluribus unum a reality again — to choose to be normal is to choose to reject silly identity group identification and unite. Instead of saying ‘normal Americans,’ you can just say ‘Americans.’ Note that while leftists rail against the term ‘normals…’” Mr. Schlichter says, “When I use it on Twitter, the reactions are always delightful!”

You know what I mean when I say normal American, don’t you? Many of you in this audience consider yourselves normal Americans, and you know that because you’re normal you’re under assault, because not everybody is normal. There’s some oddballs out there. There’s some freaks and kooks. And you know who they are. They know who they are. But they don’t want to be considered freaks and kooks, so they attack you so that you can’t be normal.

You can’t say there’s a normal. “We’re a melting pot. We are a diverse, giant melting pot of all kinds of different things, and there is no normal.” And you who think you’re normal are gonna be attacked. And that is part and parcel of what’s going on. “Militant normalcy is the result of normal people roused to anger and refusing to be pushed around anymore.”

Mr. Schlichter writes, “We prefer a free society based on personal liberty and mutual respect.

Higher Education opposes Bourgeois Values

RUSH: What essentially happened here at the University of Pennsylvania, Penn, a couple of professors, one of them working at the University of Pennsylvania, the other one University of San Diego, wrote an op-ed suggesting that what might be needed in the United States is a return to some of the nation’s values and moralities of the 1950s. And what happened after that op-ed ran is the story.

“To the list of forbidden ideas on American college campuses, add ‘bourgeois norms.’” In other words, the old advisories of hard work, self-discipline, marriage, respect for authority. When people talk about going back to the fifties, when people talking about reemerging with values from the fifties, they’re basically talking about what?

Thanks to A.F. Branco at Legal Insurrection.com for another great cartoon

 

 

Wall Street Journal: Higher Ed’s Latest Taboo Is ‘Bourgeois Norms’ – Heather Mac Donald

 

https://www.rushlimbaugh.com/daily/2017/09/19/how-an-op-ed-praising-the-1950s-triggered-leftist-snowflakes/

Parenting: Teaching Responsibility, not Blame

Dinner Topics for Tuesday

October Parenting Value Part 1

From Richard and Linda Eyre

Self-Reliance and Potential: General Methods

momdaughterwillow1. Praise. Reinforce your children’s self-image and individuality and build their confidence — that is required for self-reliance. Like flowers under rain and sunshine, children blossom and bloom under recognition and praise. “Catch them doing something good” and when you do, give effusive praise! When they make mistakes or fall short, help them accept responsibility for it and then praise that acceptance to the point that their pride in their self-reliance outshines their concern over the shortcoming.

2. Use yourself as the model and example. Show your children that you “value this value” and that you work for it. Take every opportunity to show your children how you are trying to improve. Talk about the things you think you’re good at and working to be better at.

Show pleasure in things you do well. Also, be obvious about taking the blame for mistakes you make. Say, “You know, that was my fault. Here’s what I could have done differently. . . .”

Let your children see that you can accept responsibility and blame and let them see that you take pride in who you are and that you are working to be better.

Sample Method for Preschoolers: Praise Creativity and Emphasize Individuality and Originality

Help your children to like their own unique selves. Just as small children need to hear the sound of letters over and over and over again before they learn to read, so also they need to hear their own unique abilities praised time after time before they actually believe in themselves and increase how much they like who they are. Simple as it sounds, the key “connection” of this chapter is that children who like themselves become capable of relying on themselves, of accepting responsibility, and of reaching for their full potential. Praise every effort you see them making — from drawing a picture to trying to tie their shoe. Look constantly for new things they learn to do or for any sort of aptitude at which they seem particularly good.

Help a child see that he is unique by making up an “I Am Special” book with a front cover tracing his silhouette, and with his height, weight, eye color, favorite food, funnest activity, best skills, and so on written inside. Help him understand that there is no one, anywhere, who is exactly like him.

Help children to learn to say, when they face something they can’t do, “I can’t do ___________, but I can do _____________.” This will help them later on to accept their weak points with their strengths.

Sample Method for Elementary Age: Consult Rather Than Manage

Put yourself in a role that maximizes your children’s development of self-reliance and self-knowledge. Try not to take initiative away from your child. Suggest rather than command wherever possible. Ask if he needs help rather than forcing it on him. Try to notice what he likes and where his natural gifts and abilities lie rather than trying to decide what he will do and what he should be good at.

When he asks you to do his homework, say no. But tell him you’ll check it after he’s done and tell him if it’s right and help him on the parts he’s tried to do but still doesn’t understand.

As children are old enough to understand the terms, tell them that you want to be their consultant and not their manager. Explain that they are the ones who have to decide what they will do and how well they will do it and that you want to help but not force. (Be sure they can separate this consulting help and guidance that relate to their choices from the laws and absolutes that govern their behavior.)

motherdaughterSample Method for Adolescent Age: Avoid Over-protectiveness

Build your adolescent’s self-respect, self-confidence, and self-reliance. Have clear rules (curfew, etc.) but within these, trust your adolescents and make a point of telling them that you not only trust them but have confidence in their ability to handle themselves and the situations they find themselves in.

This principle applies to smaller children also. Too many well-meaning parents may prevent a skinned knee or even a broken arm by being overly protective physically, but in the process they may exert undue influence and diminish the feelings of self-reliance and self-control.