Judeo-Christian Worldview: Theme Quotes—Light of Faith

Judeo-Christian Worldview:

Theme Quotes—Light of Faith

gate-lightAnd I said to the man who stood at the gate of the year: “Give me a light that I may tread safely into the unknown.”

And He replied: Go out into the darkness and put thine hand into the hand of God. That shall be to thee better than light and safer than a known way. ~Louise Haskins

 

That which is of God is light. ~Doctrine and Covenants 50:24

light of ChristThe Lord is my light and my salvation; whom shall I fear? the Lord is the strength of my life; of whom shall I be afraid? Psalm 27:1

Thy word is a lamp unto my feet, and a light unto my path. ~Psalm 119:105

O house of Jacob, come ye, and let us walk in the light of the Lord. ~Isaiah 2:5

Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works, and glorify your Father which is in heaven. Matthew 5:16

46 I am come a light into the world, that whosoever believeth on me should not abide in darkness. ~John 12:46

In him was life; and the life was the light of men. And the light shineth in darkness; and the darkness comprehended it not. ~John 1:4-5

For the word of the Lord is truth, and whatsoever is truth is light, and whatsoever is light is Spirit, even the Spirit of Jesus Christ. ~Doctrine and Covenants 84:45

Secret to Peace for your family

But I have commanded you to bring up your children in light and truth. ~Doctrine and Covenants 93:40

Verily I say unto you all: Arise and shine forth, that thy light may be a standard for the nations. ~Doctrine and Covenants 115:5

“It is impossible to stand upright when one plants his roots in the shifting sands of popular opinion and approval. … We will all face fear, experience ridicule, and meet opposition. Let us—all of us—have the courage to defy the consensus, the courage to stand for principle.” ~ Thomas S. Monson

Space Music Spotify Free: Astronomy lessons and Symphonic Poem about Aurora Borealis

Space Music Spotify Free:

Astronomy lessons and Symphonic Poem about Aurora Borealis

They that wait upon the Lord shall renew their strength. ~Isaiah 40:31 KJV

 

Be sure to listen HERE to this symphonic poem on the Aurora Borealis. It is beauty to match the image.

 

Astronomy lessons about Aurora Borealis

aurora borealisWhere does the Aurora Borealis come from? It starts at our Sun. The energy from our sun converts hydrogen to helium. This light and energy comes from the core of the Sun called convection cells causing magnetic fields. This energy pushes up to exit from its surface slowing down the eddies of hot gas, causing the surface to cool causing sun spots. The electrical charged gas is called plasma, which stretches like a rubber band and breaks causing billions of tons of plasma are expelled from the sun called a solar storm. The solar storms (also known as solar winds) can reach 4 million miles per hour traveling through space.

It takes about 6 hours to blast past Mercury, and about 12 hours by Venus and about 18 hours to reach Earth. The Earth has a magnetic field that is coupled together that deflects the solar storm. This causes the gas like stream to come down on the day side of north and south poles stretching down over the night side of the poles like a rubber band. The rubber band breaks causing the gases to travel up the magnetic lines towards the poles on the night side. This generates the light on the gases that we see as the Aurora Borealis.

When composing this music, I wanted to convey a kind of electrical sound or energy with a little bit of a victory written into it. The Earth has a great beauty and without this magnetic field the Earth would look a lot like the planet Mercury. What a great way of protecting itself with this marvelous shield. I hope to you may hear that in this short but powerful piece.

Want more to the story?
Visit: www.jordanmcclungmusic.com

Listen below

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Play Aurora Borealis here:

Judeo-Christian Scriptures: Keys to Understanding the Book of Revelation, Part3—Lamb of Atonement

Judeo-Christian Scriptures:

Keys to Understanding the Book of Revelation, Part3—Lamb of Atonement

Revelation 7: Jesus as the “Redemptive Lamb”

Christ lamb of atonementIn Revelation 7, the scene shifts to a group of 144,000 (12,000 from each tribe of Israel) who are “sealed” in their foreheads. In conjunction with this scene, John also sees a crowd of people, so many that “no man could number” them (verse 9). This group, clothed in white, stands before the Lamb and collectively praises the Lamb. John is then told that these people represent those “which came out of great tribulation, and have washed their robes, and made them white in the blood of the Lamb” (verse 14). Here in Revelation 7 John learns that the blood of the Lamb plays a further important function—namely, to cleanse the innumerable host who stand before the Lamb.

John’s vision again presents its readers with a riddle. When blood touches clothing, the blood typically stains it. An article of clothing that is “washed” in blood should turn red. But, in this case, the blood of the Lamb turns a stained article of clothing white, signifying the redemptive power of the Lamb. This serves as an inspiring and hopeful symbol of Jesus’s Atonement; He is able to take those who repent and transform them into something that they never could be on their own.

Gallery

Judeo-Christian Worldview: God as Creator vs. Left wing Ideology

Judeo-Christian Worldview: God as Creator vs. Left wing Ideology Rush Limbaugh This is one of the reasons despise believers, and especially the so-called religious right. The fact is, leftists and socialists do not like the competition God represents. In their … Continue reading

Judeo-Christian Scriptures: Keys to Understanding the Book of Revelation, part 2

Judeo-Christian Scriptures:

Keys to Understanding the Book of Revelation,

part 2

Revelation 5: Jesus as the “Conquering Lamb”

lion and lamb-Revelation 5One of the most vivid of these unveilings comes in Revelation 5. Here John stands before the throne of God. The Father, sitting on the throne, holds a sealed book (really a scroll) in His right hand, and a “strong angel” asks the question, “Who is worthy to open the book?”—that is, break the seals (verse 2). John weeps as he beholds that no person is found worthy to open and read the book (see verse 4).

John is informed by one of the elders that “the Lion of the tribe of Juda, the Root of David, hath prevailed to open the book, and to loose the seven seals thereof” (verse 5). Yet when John finally sees this “Lion,” it is no lion at all. Rather, what John sees is a “Lamb as it had been slain,” who approaches the throne and takes the book from the Father.

Those gathered round the throne begin to sing praises to the Lamb:

“Thou art worthy to take the book, and to open the seals thereof: for thou wast slain, and hast redeemed us to God by thy blood out of every kindred, and tongue, and people, and nation;

“And hast made us unto our God kings and priests: and we shall reign on the earth” (verses 9–10).

Some see in this episode Jesus accepting the divine role of Savior in a premortal setting, while others understand it as Jesus returning to the presence of the Father following His sojourn in mortality.

What fascinates me as a reader of the book of Revelation is the paradox used to represent Jesus as two contrary animals, a lion and a lamb. It is difficult to think of two more different animals to pair together. Lions represent strength and regality, and they had a particular connection with the tribe of Judah (see Genesis 49:9; 1 Kings 10:19–20), from which it was prophesied the Messiah Himself would descend. A lamb, on the other hand, is an animal often associated with docility and meekness, in every way the antithesis of the lion. As if to emphasize the meekness of the Lamb even further, this particular Lamb is slain, or sacrificed, and it is the shedding of the blood of the Lamb that sets in motion the events that John will view next.

Revelation 5, with its images of Jesus as both a “Lion” and a “Lamb,” presents its readers with a riddle of sorts: Can victory be obtained through submission? Can one conquer through meekness? Can life be obtained through death? John’s vision will be, in large part, an attempt to provide answers to these riddles.

Judeo-Christian Worldview: The world before Christ—What if Jesus Had Never Been Born?

Judeo-Christian Worldview:

The World before Christ—What if Jesus Had Never Been Born?

The Incredible Impact of Jesus Christ

As bad as things sometimes get, it would be unimaginable if the light of Christ had never been revealed.

Dr. Jerry Newcombe

Christ resurrectedTwenty-five years ago, D. James Kennedy and I came out with a book called, What if Jesus had Never Been Born? It ended up becoming a best-seller.

The message is very simple: Because Jesus was born, look at all these incredible blessings we have throughout the world.

Hospitals, Education

For instance, the Christian church created the phenomenon of the hospital and has created hospitals all over the world. Christianity has inspired some of the world’s greatest music and arts and has expanded education from the elite to the masses – even creating the entity of the university.

Life

Here are just a few examples of Christianity’s influence, fleshed out a bit: Prior to the coming of Christ, human life on this planet was expendable. Even today, in parts of the world where the Gospel of Christ or Christianity has not penetrated, life is exceedingly cheap. Christianity bridged the gap between the Jews—who first received the divine revelation that man was made in God’s image—and the pagans, who attributed little value to human life. Meanwhile, as we in the post-Christian West continue to abandon our Judeo-Christian heritage, life is becoming cheap once again.

In the ancient world, child sacrifice was a common practice. In ancient Rome, babies were often left to die if the father did not want them. Many Christians saved these babies and reared them in the Christian faith and helped turn the tide. Through His church, ultimately Jesus brought an end to infanticide in the Roman world. 

Christianity also helped to cease the gladiatorial contests – where slaves would be forced to fight unto death for the entertainment of the crowds. And Christianity got slavery abolished in the ancient world and then again in the modern world.

Christianity managed to stop the practice in India of widow-burning. Many times a young girl would be married to an older man. When he died, she would be burned to death on his funeral pyre…until the missionaries agitated to put a stop to this. Wherever the Gospel has truly penetrated, the value of human life has greatly increased.

Modern Science

Here’s another example: Christianity and the Bible helped give birth to modern science, beginning in the late Middle Ages. The belief that a rational God had created a rational universe inspired so many scientists to engage in scientific exploration, looking to catalog the laws the Creator had impressed upon His creation.

The early scientists thought of themselves as “thinking God’s thoughts after Him” (in the words of astronomer Johannes Kepler).

The Royal Society in England was the first key scientific group – which is the oldest scientific association still in operation – and it was founded in a Puritan college in the 1660s. I have even filmed an interview at the Royal Society in London (on this very thesis).

Virtually all of the founders of every major branch of science were Bible-believing Christians. We document that in the book with a long list. One of those men, Sir Isaac Newton, was one of the greatest scientists who ever lived – and he was a committed believer who wrote more about the Bible and theology than he did about science.

Religious Freedom

Here’s another example: America as a nation was largely settled and founded by Christians for religious freedom, which they eventually extended to people of other faiths or no faith.

George WashingtonGeorge Washington, the father of our country, said that unless we imitate “the divine author of our blessed religion,” meaning Jesus, we can never hope to be a happy nation.

John Adams noted: “We have no government armed with power capable of contending with human passions unbridled by morality and religion…Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other.”

The essence of America is that our rights come from the Creator, and our government was established on that foundation. As JFK put it in his Inaugural Address, “The rights of man come not from the generous hand of the state, but from the hand of God.”

Trading our Heritage for a Mess of Pottage

In short, we are heirs to a great civilization, thanks in large part to Christianity and the Bible. Yet, like Esau of old who sold his birthright for a single meal, we seem bent on trading our heritage in for a mess of pottage.

What if there were no Jesus? There would be no salvation, no Salvation Army, no Red Cross, no YMCA. Many of the languages set to writing would likely never have been codified since missionaries would have had no motive to do so.

Many of the barbarians the world over would never have been civilized. Cannibalism, human sacrifice, and the abandonment of children would likely still be widely practiced, as they were before Christian influence.

To paraphrase C. S. Lewis, if Jesus had never come, it would be “always winter, but never Christmas.”

 

Spotify Free: Music to overcome the Obstacles in Life

Spotify Free:

Music to overcome the Obstacles in Life

We all have obstacles in life—physical, emotional, spiritual—that challenge our progress. This vigorous piece by Jordan New Age Music will inspire to keep going. You will prevail!

Listen to ‘Obstacles’ for FREE below [be sure to ‘FOLLOW’ me and ADD this to your Spotify Playlist]

Obstacles Spotify

Judeo-Christian Scriptures: Keys to Understanding the Book of Revelation

Judeo-Christian Scriptures:

Keys to Understanding the Book of Revelation

The Book of Revelation: A Testament to the Lamb of God

By Nicholas J. Frederick

The key to understanding the book of Revelation is to simply remember why it exists: to testify of the mission, mercy, and majesty of Christ.

When we read about the dragon, the beast, the vials, the trumpets, and so forth, we need to do so within the context of the work and mission of our Savior, Jesus Christ.

Christ 2nd comingThe book of Revelation is certainly one of the more daunting books of scripture in our canon. Before they have even finished the opening chapter, readers encounter a blur of cities with strange names, stars and candlesticks, and a mysterious figure variously identified as “the Son of man” (verse 13), “the first and the last” (verse 11), and “Alpha and Omega” (verse 8), out of whose mouth appears “a sharp two-edged sword” (verse 16).

By the time readers cross the finish line of John’s vision 21 chapters later, they will have encountered—among other things—colored horses, a terrifying dragon, beasts from both the land and the sea, and scores of angels blowing trumpets and emptying vials upon the people of the earth.

Readers of the book of Revelation can come away anxious and fearful as they discern between both the literal and figurative depictions of what awaits those who live in the final days prior to the Lord’s Second Coming.

The Key to John’s Revelation: Jesus Christ

Christ and lamb1It is understandably easy to get caught up in the supernatural frenzy that runs through so much of John’s vision. After all, all of these symbols (wings, horns, eyes) and numbers (3½, 6, 7, 12, 144,000) beckon the reader to “crack the code” and decipher mysterious secrets hidden within John’s lengthy vision. However, to read the text of the book of Revelation as a sort of intricate puzzle that must be solved risks going beyond the mark and missing the vision’s central message. After all, Joseph Smith once said that “the book of Revelation is one of the plainest books God ever caused to be written.”1

A simple “key” that readers can use to understand the book of Revelation comes in the first five words of John’s record: “The Revelation of Jesus Christ” (1:1). When we read about the dragon, the beast, the vials, the trumpets, and so forth, we need to do so within the context of the work and mission of our Savior, Jesus Christ. All that comes after verse 1 needs to be read through the lens of “What does this tell me about Jesus?” This mind-set actually goes to the heart of what the term revelation in the title means. In the original Greek, the word for “revelation” is apocalypsis, from which we get our word apocalypse. But unlike the modern use of apocalypse to refer to the end of the world, apocalypsis means “to unveil something that is hidden.” What John’s vision serves to do, then, is to “unveil” Jesus Christ—to reveal his true nature, character, and mission.

Thus the book of Revelation is a vision that gradually “unveils” elements of the Savior and His atoning mission through the use of various images and symbols. One of the most important of these is the image of Jesus as a “Lamb,” a symbol that appears near the beginning of John’s vision and is a continual presence (although not always in the foreground) throughout. By the time John reaches the climactic end of his vision, the true nature and character of the Lamb will be revealed.

Parenting Advice: Be Present as Families to overcome Smartphone Addiction

Parenting Advice:

 Be Present as Families to overcome Smartphone Addiction

 

Does this subtle culture war threaten our very republic?

Exclusive: Chuck Norris advocates for real Christmas presence among families this year

By Chuck Norris

communication barrier in familiesCulture wars come in all types of shapes and sizes. But the largest and most powerful might be those that are so pervasive and subtle that they come across as benign and even positive.

I might be a little old-school, but I think there’s an education from yesteryear that needs to become more in vogue today, especially among younger generations. I’m all for most technological advances we’ve made. But when that electronic gadgetry stifles our families and social settings, when will the majority of patriots recognize it can cripple our country, too?

Fifty years ago, the first permanent link between computers at UCLA and the Stanford Research Institute was formed. This connection would grow into a large network of research and military computers and would later become the public internet we know today.

A UCLA professor named Leonard Kleinrock developed much of the theoretical groundwork for that first digital network and forerunner to the internet. The one thing Kleinrock says he never saw coming was the rise of social media and social networks. He told Fast Company’s Mark Sullivan that this is where many of the internet’s (and hence, humans’) biggest problems have surfaced and gathered strength. Kleinrock believes that the inherent fault of social spaces is users’ anonymity and lack of accountability.

On a positive note, Kurtzberg points out how technology allows colleagues to work together from afar, friends to keep in touch without restraint and grandparents to touch base with grandkids; it’s just a matter of finding that ever-elusive balance as to how and when we use our technological devices.

A column in Forbes reported, “Cellphones used to just be communication tools. Now, they’re GPS, cameras, gaming consoles, health trackers, and the list goes on. We turn to our devices for everything – from waiting in line at the grocery store or reading the news, to filing our taxes or controlling the thermostat. We don’t just use our smartphones for everything – we rely on them.”

But who’s going to tell us or model for our kids where the fine line between reliance and addiction is?

smartphone addictionForbes elaborated, “The brain on ‘smartphone’ is the same as the brain on cocaine: we get an instant high every time our screen lights up with a new notification. It’s all thanks to dopamine, the feel-good chemical that gets released every time you do something you enjoy, like eating your favorite meal or getting a hundred likes on your latest Instagram post. Dopamine reinforces (and motivates) behavior that makes us feel good and, in turn, can create addiction.”

Forbes added this clear and present danger: “The scariest part about smartphone addiction is that it can affect our physical and mental health, our relationships and our productivity. America’s obsession with smartphones has even been compared to the obesity epidemic. That’s because, just like drug or gambling addictions, smartphones provide an escape from reality.”

“At the same time, having access to a constant flow of information has all but destroyed attention spans: a few years ago, a widely publicized study proved goldfish can focus longer than we can. This increase in ADD-like symptoms has been linked to the overuse of smartphones.”

It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out that interacting via screens is markedly different from face-to-face interactions. But this distance and anonymity is where the danger lurks. Multiple studies show that people lie more, are more negative and are less cooperative when they use digital means of communicating. This clearly can have a toll on the mental health of those who come under attack. It also creates an overall shallowness of engagement people have with those around them – enhanced by the fact that the average American touches their smartphone some 2,600 times a day. It creates a sea of people around us who are present, but not really there.

2,600 times? Yes, you read that correctly.

According to Statista, in 2018, 96% of people from 18 to 29 years old owned a smartphone. More than half of children in the United States now own a smartphone by the age of 11.

A nationally representative survey by Common Sense Media of smartphone use among children ages 8-18 shows that teens today spend more than seven hours a day on these devices. “Tweens,” ages 8-12, spend nearly five hours a day.

Somewhere, sometime in the near future, there has to come some type of social boomerang – an anti-media revolution that turns back the clock to simpler times when people looked into each other’s faces instead of Facebooks. Maybe we should start that revolution this Christmas Day. Maybe we should seize back control of our social settings by returning to the age-old practice of remembering a Sabbath rest, where 100% presence is key to building relationships with God, our families, friends and communities. Please reflect upon the great wisdom of Chief Rabbi Ephraim Mirvis, regarding his advice and practice of a weekly “smartphone sabbath.”

family walkGifting your presence is not only your greatest Christmas gift but, I believe, also the most powerful weapon you have in your arsenal to make America great again. A host of studies show that when you do, you will simultaneously stimulate your own personal growth, balance and health, too. Who knew?

Let’s take it one step further. How about rediscovering and regaining control of your presence as a No. 1 New Year’s resolution for you, your marriage, family, church and community? Start with giving your presence on Christmas Day. Then observe others’ reactions and even your own internal feelings as you’re separated from the power of electronic gadgetry. Discern for yourself whether or not what I’ve shared in this column is true for your life, too.

Jesus with peoplePresence of God: Immanuel means God with Us

I don’t believe it is a coincidence that the very heart of Christmas is even about God gifting His presence. In the Bible, the Christ child is called “Immanuel,” which means “God with us.” His presence is still His greatest present to you, too.

 

Read more:

https://www.wnd.com/2019/12/subtle-culture-war-threaten-republic/

 

Judeo-Christian Scriptures: Symbolism in Book of Revelation

Judeo-Christian Scriptures:

 Symbolism in Book of Revelation

By Nicholas J. Frederick

Assistant Professor of Ancient Scripture, Brigham Young University

symbols in revelationSymbolism in the Book of Revelation

The book of Revelation is filled with symbolism that can be difficult to interpret. The following charts can be used as a tool to help you study and understand John’s vision. The information comes from a variety of sources..

Numbers

  • 7: completion; a number often taken to represent God and His divine Creation (Revelation 5:6).
  • 3½: incomplete; half of 7 (Revelation 11:9); sometimes expressed as 1,260 days (3½ years; Revelation 11:3), 42 months (3½ years; Revelation 11:2), or “a time, and times, and half a time” (Revelation 12:14).
  • 4: pertaining to the earth; four corners/four directions (Revelation 7:1).
  • 6: divine counterfeit; a number that is close to 7 but comes up short.
  • 666: likely representing the counterfeit trinity of the dragon and the two beasts—they are a “false godhead”; historically it likely referred to the Roman emperor Nero (Revelation 13:18).
  • 12: pertaining to Israel; twelve tribes of Israel; New Jerusalem measures 12,000 stadia (Revelation 7:5–8).
  • 1,000: a number signifying “a lot” of something (Revelation 5:11).
  • 144,000: (12 x 12 x 1,000), the number of the elect, perhaps signifying that there are a lot of them (Revelation 7:4).

Beings

Other