Judeo-Christian Scriptures: Keys to Understanding the Book of Revelation, part 2

Judeo-Christian Scriptures:

Keys to Understanding the Book of Revelation,

part 2

Revelation 5: Jesus as the “Conquering Lamb”

lion and lamb-Revelation 5One of the most vivid of these unveilings comes in Revelation 5. Here John stands before the throne of God. The Father, sitting on the throne, holds a sealed book (really a scroll) in His right hand, and a “strong angel” asks the question, “Who is worthy to open the book?”—that is, break the seals (verse 2). John weeps as he beholds that no person is found worthy to open and read the book (see verse 4).

John is informed by one of the elders that “the Lion of the tribe of Juda, the Root of David, hath prevailed to open the book, and to loose the seven seals thereof” (verse 5). Yet when John finally sees this “Lion,” it is no lion at all. Rather, what John sees is a “Lamb as it had been slain,” who approaches the throne and takes the book from the Father.

Those gathered round the throne begin to sing praises to the Lamb:

“Thou art worthy to take the book, and to open the seals thereof: for thou wast slain, and hast redeemed us to God by thy blood out of every kindred, and tongue, and people, and nation;

“And hast made us unto our God kings and priests: and we shall reign on the earth” (verses 9–10).

Some see in this episode Jesus accepting the divine role of Savior in a premortal setting, while others understand it as Jesus returning to the presence of the Father following His sojourn in mortality.

What fascinates me as a reader of the book of Revelation is the paradox used to represent Jesus as two contrary animals, a lion and a lamb. It is difficult to think of two more different animals to pair together. Lions represent strength and regality, and they had a particular connection with the tribe of Judah (see Genesis 49:9; 1 Kings 10:19–20), from which it was prophesied the Messiah Himself would descend. A lamb, on the other hand, is an animal often associated with docility and meekness, in every way the antithesis of the lion. As if to emphasize the meekness of the Lamb even further, this particular Lamb is slain, or sacrificed, and it is the shedding of the blood of the Lamb that sets in motion the events that John will view next.

Revelation 5, with its images of Jesus as both a “Lion” and a “Lamb,” presents its readers with a riddle of sorts: Can victory be obtained through submission? Can one conquer through meekness? Can life be obtained through death? John’s vision will be, in large part, an attempt to provide answers to these riddles.

Judeo-Christian Scriptures: Keys to Understanding the Book of Revelation

Judeo-Christian Scriptures:

Keys to Understanding the Book of Revelation

The Book of Revelation: A Testament to the Lamb of God

By Nicholas J. Frederick

The key to understanding the book of Revelation is to simply remember why it exists: to testify of the mission, mercy, and majesty of Christ.

When we read about the dragon, the beast, the vials, the trumpets, and so forth, we need to do so within the context of the work and mission of our Savior, Jesus Christ.

Christ 2nd comingThe book of Revelation is certainly one of the more daunting books of scripture in our canon. Before they have even finished the opening chapter, readers encounter a blur of cities with strange names, stars and candlesticks, and a mysterious figure variously identified as “the Son of man” (verse 13), “the first and the last” (verse 11), and “Alpha and Omega” (verse 8), out of whose mouth appears “a sharp two-edged sword” (verse 16).

By the time readers cross the finish line of John’s vision 21 chapters later, they will have encountered—among other things—colored horses, a terrifying dragon, beasts from both the land and the sea, and scores of angels blowing trumpets and emptying vials upon the people of the earth.

Readers of the book of Revelation can come away anxious and fearful as they discern between both the literal and figurative depictions of what awaits those who live in the final days prior to the Lord’s Second Coming.

The Key to John’s Revelation: Jesus Christ

Christ and lamb1It is understandably easy to get caught up in the supernatural frenzy that runs through so much of John’s vision. After all, all of these symbols (wings, horns, eyes) and numbers (3½, 6, 7, 12, 144,000) beckon the reader to “crack the code” and decipher mysterious secrets hidden within John’s lengthy vision. However, to read the text of the book of Revelation as a sort of intricate puzzle that must be solved risks going beyond the mark and missing the vision’s central message. After all, Joseph Smith once said that “the book of Revelation is one of the plainest books God ever caused to be written.”1

A simple “key” that readers can use to understand the book of Revelation comes in the first five words of John’s record: “The Revelation of Jesus Christ” (1:1). When we read about the dragon, the beast, the vials, the trumpets, and so forth, we need to do so within the context of the work and mission of our Savior, Jesus Christ. All that comes after verse 1 needs to be read through the lens of “What does this tell me about Jesus?” This mind-set actually goes to the heart of what the term revelation in the title means. In the original Greek, the word for “revelation” is apocalypsis, from which we get our word apocalypse. But unlike the modern use of apocalypse to refer to the end of the world, apocalypsis means “to unveil something that is hidden.” What John’s vision serves to do, then, is to “unveil” Jesus Christ—to reveal his true nature, character, and mission.

Thus the book of Revelation is a vision that gradually “unveils” elements of the Savior and His atoning mission through the use of various images and symbols. One of the most important of these is the image of Jesus as a “Lamb,” a symbol that appears near the beginning of John’s vision and is a continual presence (although not always in the foreground) throughout. By the time John reaches the climactic end of his vision, the true nature and character of the Lamb will be revealed.

Easter 2013, Jesus Christ, and the Lamb of God

Dinner Topics for Tuesday

 

Defining Moment:

Atonement—the reconciliation of God and man through the sacrificial death of Jesus Christ

 

A Loving Father

       *The Atonement

 

. . .it was accounted unto Abraham in the wilderness to be obedient unto the commands of God in offering up his son Isaac, which is a similitude of God and his Only Begotten Son. (Jacob 4:5)

For I know him, that he will command his children and his household after him, and they shall keep the way of the Lord.” (Genesis 18:19)

abrahamisaacOn the eve of his departure with Isaac for Mount Moriah, Abraham must have presided at dinner with a heavy heart.  His mind surely called to remembrance all the teachings from the Spirit throughout his life. Of Abraham God had said, “Shall I hide from Abraham that thing which I do?  For I know him, that he will command his children and his household after him, and they shall keep the way of the Lord.” (Genesis 18:19)

From the time of Adam, people knew that the blood sacrifices they offered were a type, or similitude, of the sacrifice of Christ.  Knowing of the plan for a coming Redeemer comforted Abraham as he faced the supreme test of faith and obedience which the Lord required of him.

God loved Abraham, and prepared him well for the ordeal that lay ahead of him.  He appeared to him in a vision, saying, “Fear not, Abram: I am thy shield, and thy exceeding great reward.” (Genesis 15:1) And Abraham believed the Lord, and trusted Him.

So great was his faith and trust in his Heavenly Father, that when Isaac questioned him, Abraham was able to answer, “My son, God will provide himself a lamb for a burnt offering.”(Genesis 22:8)

God did indeed provide the Lamb.  Only He spared not His own Son.

What might have been the feelings of our Father in Heaven when He sacrificed his own Son?  At some point in time, we as parents may be requiredlamb to watch our own children suffer— this, either as consequences of their own unwise choices, or perhaps even circumstances due to no fault of their own.  At that time, we are faced with the realization that we cannot pass through the trial on their behalf.  Only they can endure the tribulation.  Knowing that the lamb has been provided, we can exercise our own faith to empower them to pass the test.

Dinner Talk

1. Why are fathers so important?

2. How can fathers be involved in the teaching of their children?

3. Why is it necessary to teach by both precept and example?

4. How can fathers be both firm and loving?

5. Behold, he offereth himself a sacrifice for sin, to answer the ends of the law, unto all those who have a broken heart and a contrite spirit; and unto none else can the ends of the law be answered.  (2Nephi2:7 )See 2 Nephi 2 and Alma 40-42.  What is the atonement of Christ?  Why is it important for parents to teach their children about the atonement of Jesus Christ?

Epic Stories for Character Education, p.41

Show God’s love to your family on a daily basis. Christian Parenting