Mass Shootings in America History Timeline: Mind-Altering Drugs are Major Influence

Mass Shootings in America History Timeline:

Mind-Altering Drugs are Major Influence

NOTE: Anti-depressant drugs are prescribed. Companies producing these dangerous drugs are keeping the dangerous truth from the public, and doctors are complicit in prescribing them irresponsibly. Sensible nutrition nourishes the brain. Medication does not create health. Most of the killers are male, but there are women also who have murdered their families. When are we going to face the truth and stop the madness? When you turn your mind over to the influence of a drug, you are ceding your free will. ~C.A. Davidson

Media ignoring 1 crucial factor in Florida school shooting

David Kupelian

In the case of Nikolas Cruz, the 19-year-old Florida mass-shooter, his mother’s sister, Barbara Kumbatovich, told the Miami Herald that she believed Cruz was on medication to deal with his emotional fragility.

Fact:

A disturbing number of perpetrators of school shootings and similar mass murders in our modern era were either on – or just recently coming off of – psychiatric medications. A few of the most high-profile examples, out of many others, include:

  • 1981 John Hinckley, age 25, took four Valium two hours before shooting and almost killing President Ronald Reagan in 1981. In the assassination attempt, Hinckley also wounded press secretary James Brady, Secret Service agent Timothy McCarthy and policeman Thomas Delahanty.
  • In 1988, 31-year-old Laurie Dann went on a shooting rampage in a second-grade classroom in Winnetka, Illinois, killing one child and wounding six. She had been taking the antidepressant Anafranil as well as Lithium, long used to treat mania.
  • 1989 In another famous case, 47-year-old Joseph T. Wesbecker, just a month after he began taking Prozac in 1989, shot 20 workers at Standard Gravure Corp. in Louisville, Kentucky, killing nine. Prozac-maker Eli Lilly later settled a lawsuit brought by survivors.
  • 1989 Patrick Purdy went on a schoolyard shooting rampage in Stockton, California, in 1989, which became the catalyst for the original legislative frenzy to ban “semiautomatic assault weapons” in California and the nation. The 25-year-old Purdy, who murdered five children and wounded 30, had been on Amitriptyline, an antidepressant, as well as the antipsychotic drug Thorazine.
  • 1996 Kurt Danysh, 18, shot his own father to death in 1996, a little more than two weeks after starting on Prozac. Danysh’s description of own his mental-emotional state at the time of the murder is chilling: “I didn’t realize I did it until after it was done,” Danysh said. “This might sound weird, but it felt like I had no control of what I was doing, like I was left there just holding a gun.”
  • 1997 In Paducah, Kentucky, in late 1997, 14-year-old Michael Carneal, son of a prominent attorney, traveled to Heath High School and started shooting students in a prayer meeting taking place in the school’s lobby, killing three and leaving another paralyzed. Carneal reportedly was on Ritalin.
  • 1998 Kip Kinkel, 15, murdered his parents in 1998 and the next day went to his school, Thurston High in Springfield, Oregon, and opened fire on his classmates, killing two and wounding 22 others. He had been prescribed both Prozac and Ritalin.
  • 1999 Columbine mass-killer Eric Harris was taking Luvox – like Prozac, Paxil, Zoloft, Effexor and many others, a modern and widely prescribed type of antidepressant drug called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or SSRIs. Harris and fellow student Dylan Klebold went on a hellish school shooting rampage in 1999 during which they killed 12 students and a teacher and wounded 24 others before turning their guns on themselves. Luvox manufacturer Solvay Pharmaceuticals concedes that during short-term controlled clinical trials, 4 percent of children and youth taking Luvox – that’s one in 25 – developed mania, a dangerous and violence-prone mental derangement characterized by extreme excitement and delusion.
  • 2001, Christopher Pittman, when he was 12 years old. The case drew national attention in part because of his age at the time of the crime and in part because his defense that the prescription drug Zoloft influenced his actions . He struggled in court to explain why he murdered his grandparents, who had provided the only love and stability he’d ever known in his turbulent life. “When I was lying in my bed that night,” he testified, “I couldn’t sleep because my voice in my head kept echoing through my mind telling me to kill them.” Christopher had been angry with his grandfather, who had disciplined him earlier that day for hurting another student during a fight on the school bus. So later that night, he shot both of his grandparents in the head with a .410 shotgun as they slept and then burned down their South Carolina home, where he had lived with them. “I got up, got the gun, and I went upstairs and I pulled the trigger,” he recalled. “Through the whole thing, it was like watching your favorite TV show. You know what is going to happen, but you can’t do anything to stop it.” Pittman’s lawyers would later argue that the boy had been a victim of “involuntary intoxication,” since his doctors had him taking the antidepressants Paxil and Zoloft just prior to the murders.
  • In 2005, 16-year-old Jeff Weise, living on Minnesota’s Red Lake Indian Reservation, shot and killed nine people and wounded five others before killing himself. Weise had been taking Prozac.
  • 2006 Andrea Yates, in one of the most heartrending crimes in modern history, drowned all five of her children – aged 7 years down to 6 months – in a bathtub. Insisting inner voices commanded her to kill her children, she had become increasingly psychotic over the course of several years. At her 2006 murder re-trial (after a 2002 guilty verdict was overturned on appeal), Yates’ longtime friend Debbie Holmes testified: “She asked me if I thought Satan could read her mind and if I believed in demon possession.” And Dr. George Ringholz, after evaluating Yates for two days, recounted an experience she had after the birth of her first child: “What she described was feeling a presence … Satan … telling her to take a knife and stab her son Noah,” Ringholz said, adding that Yates’ delusion at the time of the bathtub murders was not only that she had to kill her children to save them, but that Satan had entered her and that she had to be executed in order to kill Satan.Yates had been taking the antidepressant Effexor. In November 2005, more than four years after Yates drowned her children, Effexor manufacturer Wyeth Pharmaceuticals quietly added “homicidal ideation” to the drug’s list of “rare adverse events.” The Medical Accountability Network, a private nonprofit focused on medical ethics issues, publicly criticized Wyeth, saying Effexor’s “homicidal ideation” risk wasn’t well publicized and that Wyeth failed to send letters to doctors or issue warning labels announcing the change.And what exactly does “rare” mean in the phrase “rare adverse events”? The FDA defines it as occurring in less than one in 1,000 people. But since that same year 19.2 million prescriptions for Effexor were filled in the U.S., statistically that means thousands of Americans might experience “homicidal ideation” – murderous thoughts – as a result of taking just this one brand of antidepressant drug. Effexor is Wyeth’s best-selling drug, by the way, which in one recent year brought in over $3 billion in sales, accounting for almost a fifth of the company’s annual revenues.

Paxil’s known “adverse drug reactions” – according to the drug’s FDA-approved label – include “mania,” “insomnia,” “anxiety,” “agitation,” “confusion,” “amnesia,” “depression,” “paranoid reaction,” “psychosis,” “hostility,” “delirium,” “hallucinations,” “abnormal thinking,” “depersonalization” and “lack of emotion,” among others. The preceding examples are only a few of the best-known offenders who had been taking prescribed psychiatric drugs before committing their violent crimes – there are many others.

Whether we like to admit it or not, it is undeniable that when certain people living on the edge of sanity take psychiatric medications, those drugs can – and occasionally do – push them over the edge into violent madness. Remember, every single SSRI antidepressant sold in the United States of America today, no matter what brand or manufacturer, bears a “black box” FDA warning label – the government’s most serious drug warning – of “increased risks of suicidal thinking and behavior, known as suicidality, in young adults ages 18 to 24.” Common sense tells us that where there are suicidal thoughts – especially in a very, very angry person – homicidal thoughts may not be far behind. Indeed, the mass shooters we are describing often take their own lives when the police show up, having planned their suicide ahead of time.

Never lost a lawsuit

Pharmaceutical manufacturers are understandably nervous about publicity connecting their highly lucrative drugs to murderous violence, which may be why we rarely if ever hear any confirmation to those first-day reports from grief-stricken relatives who confide to journalists that the perpetrator was taking psychiatric drugs. After all, who are by far the biggest sponsors of TV news? Pharmaceutical companies, and they don’t want any free publicity of this sort.

The truth is, to avoid costly settlements and public relations catastrophes – such as when GlaxoSmithKline was ordered to pay millions of dollars to the family of 60-year-old Donald Schell who murdered his wife, daughter and granddaughter in a fit of rage shortly after starting on Paxil – drug companies’ legal teams have quietly and skillfully settled hundreds of cases out-of-court, shelling out hundreds of millions of dollars to plaintiffs. Pharmaceutical giant Eli Lilly fought scores of legal claims against Prozac in this way, settling for cash before the complaint could go to court while stipulating that the settlement remain secret – and then claiming it had never lost a Prozac lawsuit.

Which brings us back to the key question: When are we going to get official confirmation as to whether Nikolas Cruz, like so many other mass shooters, had been taking psychiatric drugs?

Read More

http://www.wnd.com/2018/02/media-ignoring-1-crucial-factor-in-florida-school-shooting/

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School Shooting Facts: Mass Shootings have Prescription Mind-Altering Drugs in Common

School Shooting Facts:

Mass Shootings have Prescription Mind-Altering Drugs in Common

Be aware that most of the shooters are mentally unstable and are on drugs with dangerous side effects. As they plan their attack, they may post something on the internet or say something. IF YOU SEE OR HEAR SOMETHING, SAY SOMETHING. Then, AUTHORITIES: PAY ATTENTION!

FOX News Cuts Off Reporter When She Links Psychotropic Drugs to Florida Shooter

Matt Agorist

Stephen PaddockOmar MateenGavin Long, Eric Harris, Dylan Klebold, James Holmes, and now, Nikolas Cruz all have one thing in common other than the mass murders they carried out. They were all reportedly taking prescription drugs which alter their state of mind and carry a host of negative side effects ranging from aggression and suicide to homicidal ideation.

Suicide, birth defects, heart problems, hostility, violence, aggression, hallucinations, self-harm, delusional thinking, homicidal ideation, and death are just a few of the side effects caused by the medication taken by the monsters named above, some of which are known as SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors), or antidepressants.

There have been 150 studies in 17 countries on antidepressant-induced side effects. There have been 134 drug regulatory agency warnings from 11 countries and the EU warning about the dangerous side effects of antidepressants.

Despite this deadly laundry list of potential reactions to these medications, their use has skyrocketed by 400% since 1988. Coincidentally, as antidepressant use went up, so did mass shootings.

https://freedomoutpost.com/fox-news-cuts-off-reporter-links-psychotropic-drugs-florida-shooter/

Truth about Las Vegas Shooting: Mass Shootings, Mind Altering Drugs and Radicalization

Truth about Las Vegas Shooting:

UPDATE:

Paddock prescribed drug linked to violent outbursts

Use of anti-anxiety medication can sometimes trigger aggressive behavior, psychotic experiences

Dr. Michael First, a clinical psychiatry professor at Columbia University and expert on benzodiazepines, contended Paddock’s attack was clearly premeditated, but acknowledged diazepam “fuels aggression.”

“What this man in Las Vegas did was very planned,” he told the Review-Journal.
But the truth about mass shootings and psychiatric drugs is being swept under the rug by the media. Corporate media outlets face a major conflict of interests by exposing big pharma corruption.

Mass Shootings, Mind Altering Drugs and Radicalization

“When an Islamic terrorist blows up a school with kids in it, we are told not to judge all Muslims by the acts of a few,” said Sen. John Kennedy, R-La. “And I agree with that. So why do we want to judge all 80 million gun owners in America because of the acts of one perverted idiot? I don’t know what else to call him. I don’t think our problem in America is gun laws. I think criminals obey gun laws like politicians keep promises.”

2 lethal traits of America’s deadliest mass shooters

Alicia Powe

Instead of jumping on the anti-gun bandwagon in the wake of the Las Vegas massacre, concerned Americans might be better served by turning their attention to what the nation’s deadliest mass shooters have in common.

There’s no escaping the two lethal traits shared by almost every single one of them …

Over the last 20 years, the perpetrators of nearly all the deadliest mass shooting in the United States have shared one of two traits: Besides killing innocents with firearms, they either were Muslims or were using mind-altering psychiatric drugs.

Stephen Craig Paddock is alleged to have opened fire from a 32nd-floor hotel room on a crowd of more than 22,000 gathered for a country music festival Sunday night, killing at least 59 people and injuring at least 515 others, making it the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history.

Paddock’s brother, Eric Paddock, revealed Monday that their father, Patrick Benjamin Paddock, was a bank robber who escaped prison and was on the FBI’s Most Wanted list. The elder Paddock was “diagnosed as psychopathic” and “reportedly had suicidal tendencies.”

  1. James Hodgkinson, congressional baseball practice (2017):

Hodgkinson, a Bernie Sanders supporter who reportedly “hated Republicans,” opened fired at a GOP congressional baseball practice on June 14, wounding Rep. Steve Scalise, R-La., two Capitol Police officers and one congressional staffer.Timothy Slater, special agent in charge of the FBI’s Washington Field Office, revealed that Hodgkinson was taking prescription drugs, but he did not disclose what the drugs were for or whether he was abusing them.

  1. Esteban Santiago-Ruiz, Fort Lauderdale airport (2017):

Santiago-Ruiz shot five people to death and injured six others in Fort Lauderdale’s Hollywood International Airport Jan. 7, 2017, near the baggage claim.

Relatives said he had been receiving psychological treatment.

The Fort Lauderdale shooter was also reportedly speaking to online jihadists and practicing shooting his pistol for months before he opened fire.

  1. Omar Mateen, Orlando, Florida, Pulse nightclub (2016): 49 killed

It is being widely reported in the media that Mateen had bipolar disorder. His ex-wife, Sitora YuSufi, says Mateen claimed he was bipolar.

  1. Rizwan Farook and Tashfeen Malik, San Bernardino (2015): 14 killed

A newlywed couple, U.S. citizen Rizwan Farook and his Pakistani wife Tashfeen Malik, who was a permanent resident, left their 6-month-old baby with a grandmother while they stormed a holiday party at the Inland Regional Center in San Bernardino, California, killing 14 people and injuring 22 others.

Former FBI Director James Comey concluded that Farook and Malik were radicalized and likely inspired by foreign terrorist organizations.

  1. Adam Lanza, Sandy Hook (2012): 26 killed

A 20-year-old American citizen, Lanza killed his mother in December 2012 before shooting and killing 20 children and six adults at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut. He later committed suicide.

According to the website AbleChild, Paul Fox, the psychiatrist who treated Lanza was arrested for sexual misconduct and charged with three felony counts of sexual assault on a then-19-year-old patient for distributing the victim a “dynamic cocktail of psychiatric drugs” and for questionable billing practices and patient records retention.

It is unclear what psychiatric diagnoses or what kind of psychiatric “dynamic cocktail” Lanza was prescribed while a patient under Fox’s “care” because the state of Connecticut refuses to release Lanza’s mental health records or autopsy and toxicology results.

Fox told detectives who were investigating the Sandy Hook massacre in 2012 that he had little memory of Lanza and destroyed any records he had of his treatment of Lanza prior to 2012.

  1. Seung-Hui Cho Virginia Tech (2007): 32 killed

Cho, a 23-year-old student and South Korean national, went on a rampage at Virginia Tech University in April 2007, killing 27 students and five teachers before committing suicide.

The New York Times has reported the killer was on a prescription medication, and authorities said he was confined briefly several years before the attack for a mental episode.

  1. Nidal Hasan, Fort Hood military base (2009): 13 killed

After jumping up on a desk and shouting “Allahu akbar,” U.S. Army psychiatrist Nidal Hasan opened fire and sprayed more than 100 bullets inside a crowded building where troops were preparing to deploy to Afghanistan in November 2009. He killed 13 people and injuring 42 others.

Hasan reportedly was disciplined prior to the shootings for pushing his beliefs on others. His business card carried an abbreviation for “Soldier of Allah.”

  1. James Holmes, Aurora, Colorado (2012): 12 killed

Holmes, a U.S. citizen born in California and a graduate student in neuroscience, stormed a movie theater airing a late-night premiere of a “Batman” film in Aurora, Colorado, in July 2012. He was wearing body armor when he opened fire and released tear gas.

Holmes was using two mind-altering psychiatric drugs during the night of the shooting, including the antidepressant Sertaline, generically known as Zoloft.

Zoloft has an FDA “black box” warning, the strongest warning the agency issues, cautioning that the drug can increase the risk of suicidal thoughts and behavior. Other dangerous side effects of Zoloft include agitation, irritability, anxiety, hostility, aggressiveness, hallucinations, mania, impulsivity, delusions and apathy.

Holmes was also on Klonopin, a drug that was initially designed to treat epileptic seizures by lowering electoral activity in the brain. It shares the same side effects of Zoloft but also can reportedly cause unpredictable reactions in people.

  1. Jiverly Antares Wong, New York immigrant center: 13 killed

A Vietnamese immigrant, Jiverly Antares Wong, shot and killed 13 people at an upstate New York immigration center in April 2009 before killing himself.

Wong displayed had no history of mental illness, but a letter he sent to a Syracuse television station revealed he was harboring a growing paranoia. Just before his killing spree, Wong sent a two-page delusional rant to the TV station saying the police were spying on him, sneaking into his home and trying to get into car accidents with him.

  1. Aaron Alexis, Navy Yard headquarters (2013): 12 killed

Alexis, a 34-year-old information technology employee at a defense-related computer company, used a valid pass in September 2013 to get into the Navy Yard and then opened fire for more than a half hour, killing 12 people before he was slain by police in the shootout.

U.S. law enforcement found no evidence to suggest Alexis’ motive was political or religious.

Alexis never sought care from a mental health specialist. He was never declared mentally ill by a judge or committed to a hospital, according to the Veteran Affairs medical centers.

But less than a month before Alexis went on the shooting rampage, he visited U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs medical centers twice, seeking treatment for insomnia. He was given medication to help him sleep, but when asked by doctors, he denied having thoughts about harming himself or others.

In August 2013, the former member of the Navy Reserve complained to Rhode Island police that people were talking to him through the walls and ceiling of his hotel rooms and sending microwave vibrations into his body to deprive him of sleep.

  1. Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold Columbine High (1999): 12 killed

Harris and Klebold, two American teenage boys, shot and killed 12 classmates and a teacher, wounding 26 others before killing themselves at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado, in April 1999.

Harris was reportedly rejected by Marine Corps recruiters days before the Columbine High School massacre because he was under a doctor’s care and had been prescribed antidepressant medications Luvox, Prozac, Paxil, Zoloft and Effexor, which he was on at the time he opened fire at Columbine High School.

Klebold’s medical records remain sealed, but at least one public report exists of a Klebold friend witnessing him take the antidepressants Paxil and Zoloft.

  1. George Hennard, Texas restaurant (1991): 22 killed

In October 1991, 35-year-old Hennard, a U.S citizen, shot dead 22 people in a restaurant in the town of Killeen before shooting himself.

Hennard had suffered from a paranoid personality disorder, and experts said he was at “the very border of mental illness.”