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Moral Character Education: Parenting Advice, How to Teach Kids Self-Reliance

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Moral Character Education: Parenting Advice, How to Teach Kids Self-Reliance Resilience—Spiritual Armor for Today’s Youth By Lynn G. Robbins Our children are capable of thriving in the face of today’s challenges. Our charge as parents is to help prepare them … Continue reading

Critical Thinking Skills: Parable shows Unseen Realities of Bad Economic Policy

Dinner Topics

Moral Character Education

Critical Thinking Skills:

Parable shows Unseen Realities of Bad Economic Policy

Frederic Bastiat and Legalized Plunder, or Socialism Failure

Frederic Bastiat: The Law

keyNote: I found the Parable of the Broken Window when I clicked on just one more link. Parents, teach your children to pursue topics they are interested in. Your young people will excel in their education when they educate themselves, and they acquire a thirst for learning. You will not find any teachings of Frederic Bastiat in typical public schools. And look what they are missing!

The Law, by Frederic Bastiat. This is a short little book written in the nineteenth century. It really nails the notion of governments who think they can plunder the citizenry, just because they are the government and “above the law.” This is classic literature that you will want in your library, and which teens and young adults will find thought-provoking. It is well known by reliable historians, and should be easily available to purchase online. I highly recommend this little book to read aloud and discuss together. It will give you a clear understanding of how economics should be. ~C.A. Davidson

 

The Parable of the Broken Window

Bastiat’s original parable or story of the broken window from Ce qu’on voit et ce qu’on ne voit pas (1850):

brokenwindowHave you ever witnessed the anger of the good shopkeeper, James Goodfellow, when his careless son happened to break a pane of glass? If you have been present at such a scene, you will most assuredly bear witness to the fact that every one of the spectators, were there even thirty of them, by common consent apparently, offered the unfortunate owner this invariable consolation-“It is an ill wind that blows nobody good. Everybody must live, and what would become of the glaziers if panes of glass were never broken?”

Now, this form of condolence contains an entire theory, which it will be well to show up in this simple case, seeing that it is precisely the same as that which, unhappily, regulates the greater part of our economical institutions.

Suppose it cost six francs to repair the damage, and you say that the accident brings six francs to the glazier’s trade—that it encourages that trade to the amount of six francs—I grant it; I have not a word to say against it; you reason justly. The glazier comes, performs his task, receives his six francs, rubs his hands, and, in his heart, blesses the careless child. All this is that which is seen.

But if, on the other hand, you come to the conclusion, as is too often the case, that it is a good thing to break windows, that it causes money to circulate, and that the encouragement of industry in general will be the result of it, you will oblige me to call out, “Stop there! Your theory is confined to that which is seen; it takes no account of that which is not seen.”

It is not seen that as our shopkeeper has spent six francs upon one thing, he cannot spend them upon another. It is not seen that if he had not had a window to replace, he would, perhaps, have replaced his old shoes, or added another book to his library. In short, he would have employed his six francs in some way, which this accident has prevented.[1][2]

Bastiat’s argument

Austrian theorists, and Bastiat himself, apply the parable of the broken window in a different way. Suppose it was discovered that the little boy was actually hired by the glazier, and paid a franc for every window he broke. Suddenly the same act would be regarded as theft: the glazier was breaking windows in order to force people to hire his services. Yet the facts observed by the onlookers remain true: the glazier benefits from the business at the expense of the baker, the tailor, and so on.

Bastiat argues that people actually do endorse activities which are morally equivalent to the glazier hiring a boy to break windows for him:

Whence we arrive at this unexpected conclusion: “Society loses the value of things which are uselessly destroyed;” and we must assent to a maxim which will make the hair of protectionists stand on end—To  break, to spoil, to waste, is not to encourage national labour; or, more briefly, “destruction is not profit.”

What will you say, Moniteur Industriel[3]-what will you say, disciples of good M. F. Chamans, who has calculated with so much precision how much trade would gain by the burning of Paris, from the number of houses it would be necessary to rebuild?[1][2]

Bastiat is not addressing production – he is addressing the stock of wealth. In other words, Bastiat does not merely look at the immediate but at the longer effects of breaking the window. Moreover, Bastiat does not only take into account the consequences of breaking the window for one group but for all groups, for society as a whole.[4]

Complete article from Wikipedia

Biography

BastiatBastiat was born in Bayonne, Aquitaine, a port town in the south of France on the Bay of Biscay, on 29 June 1801. His father, Pierre Bastiat, was a prominent businessman in the town. His mother died in 1808 when Frédéric was seven years old.[2] His father moved inland to the town of Mugron with Frédéric following soon after. The Bastiat estate in Mugron had been acquired during the French Revolution and had previously belonged to the Marquis of Poyanne. Pierre Bastiat died in 1810, leaving Frédéric an orphan. He was taken in by his paternal grandfather and his maiden aunt, Justine Bastiat.[2] He attended a school in Bayonne, but his aunt thought poorly of it and so enrolled him in Saint-Sever. At 17, he left school at Sorèze to work for his uncle in his family’s export business. It was the same firm where his father had been a partner. Economist Thomas DiLorenzo suggests that this experience was crucial to Bastiat’s later work since it allowed young Frédéric to acquire first-hand knowledge of how regulation can affect markets.[3] Sheldon Richman notes that “he came of age during the Napoleonic wars, with their extensive government intervention in economic affairs.”[4]

Bastiat began to develop an intellectual interest. He no longer wished to work with his uncle and dreamed of going to Paris for formal studies. This dream never came true as his grandfather was in poor health and wished to go to the Mugron estate. Bastiat accompanied him and took care of him. The next year, when Bastiat was 24, his grandfather died, leaving the young man the family estate, thereby providing him with the means to further his theoretical inquiries.[2] Bastiat developed intellectual interests in several areas including “philosophy, history, politics, religion, travel, poetry, political economy and biography.”[3] “After the middle-class Revolution of 1830, Bastiat became politically active and was elected justice of the peace of Mugron in 1831 and to the Council General (county-level assembly) of Landes in 1832. He was elected to the national legislative assembly after the French Revolution of 1848.”[1]

His public career as an economist began only in 1844 when his first article was published in the Journal des economistes in October of that year. It was cut short by his untimely death in 1850. Bastiat had contracted tuberculosis, probably during his tours throughout France to promote his ideas, and that illness eventually prevented him from making further speeches (particularly at the legislative assembly to which he was elected in 1848 and 1849) and took his life. In the fall of 1850, he was sent to Italy by his doctors. He first traveled Pisa, then onto Rome. On 24 December 1850, Bastiat called those with him to approach his bed. He murmured twice the words “The truth” then passed away.[2]

Bastiat’s most famous work, however, is undoubtedly The Law, originally published as a pamphlet in 1850. It defines, through development, a just system of laws and then demonstrates how such law facilitates a free society.

 

manwbagBastiat asserted that the sole purpose of government is to defend and protect the right of an individual to life, liberty, and property. From this definition, Bastiat concluded that the law cannot defend life, liberty, and property if it promotes socialist policies, which are inherently opposed to these very things. In this way, he says, the law is perverted and turned against the only things (life, liberty, and property) it is supposed to defend.[12]

He was also a strong supporter of free trade. He “was inspired by and routinely corresponded with Richard Cobden and the English Anti-Corn Law League and worked with free-trade associations in France.”[1]

In The Law, Bastiat explains that, if the privileged classes use the government for “legalized plunder”, this will encourage the lower classes to revolt or use socialist “legalized plunder” and that the correct response to both the socialists and the corporatists [crony capitalism and corporate socialism are the same] is to cease all “legalized plunder”. Bastiat also explains why his position is that the law cannot defend life, liberty, and property if it promotes socialist policies. When used to obtain “legalized plunder” for any group, he says, the law is perverted and turned against the thing it is supposed to defend.[12]

 

Dinner Talk

1. What do you learn from the Parable of the Broken Window? Why do Progressives and Socialists use the broken economy to make people dependent on them? (Hint: They get more power and votes.)

2. Bastiat writes of “legalized plunder.” In ancient American history, there was a group called Gadiantons who took over the free government and engaged in plunder. How is this a type of what governments do today? What recent examples can you give of our government engaging in “legalized plunder?”

Judeo-Christian Worldview: Moral Character Education Theme Quotes

Judeo-Christian Worldview:

Moral Character Education Theme Quotes

It is so obvious that the great good and the terrible evil in the world today are the sweet and the bitter fruits of the rearing of yesterday’s children. As we train a new generation, so will the world be in a few years. If you are worried about the future, then look to the upbringing of your children. ~Gordon B. Hinckley

Sin has many tools, but a lie is the handle which fits them all. ~Oliver Wendell Homes

The Lord wants us to be peacemakers, but he doesn’t want peace at the cost of truth. ~Sarah Sundin

We need [men and] women who can detect deception in all of its forms. ~Russell M. Nelson

If we continue to teach about tolerance and intolerance instead of good and evil, we will end up with tolerance of evil. ~Dennis Prager

“The face of sin today often wears the mask of tolerance. Do not be deceived; behind that facade is heartache, unhappiness, and pain. … If your so-called friends urge you to do anything you know to be wrong, you be the one to make a stand for right, even if you stand alone.” ~Thomas S. Monson

We may be bucking a strong tide, but we must teach our children that sin is sin. ~Spencer W. Kimball

Obedience to God is the habit of a free man. ~James Talmadge

Whether we recognize it or not, we are connected with our past . . . people who care nothing for the past usually have no thought for the future and are selfish in the way they use the present. (World Conference 1980)

Love people, not things; use things, not people. ~Spencer W. Kimball

Choose your friends with caution, plan your future with purpose, and frame your life with faith. ~Thomas S. Monson

Never grow a wishbone where a backbone ought to be.

The secret to having it all is knowing that  you already do.

“Vice is a monster of so frightful mien
As to be hated needs but to be seen;
Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face,
We first endure, then pity, then embrace.” ― Alexander Pope

Society cannot exist unless a controlling power upon will and appetite be placed somewhere, and the less of it there is within, the more there must be without. It is ordained in the eternal constitution of things, that men of intemperate minds cannot be free. ~Edmund Burke

It has been said that the door of history turns on small hinges, and so do people’s lives. The choices we make determine our destiny. ~Thomas S. Monson

I look to a day when people will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. ~Martin Luther King, Jr.

Woe unto them that call aevil bgood, and good evil; that put cdarkness for dlight, and light for darkness; that put bitter for sweet, and sweet for bitter! ~Isaiah 5:20

The opposite of Courage: “Most of the world fears the raised fist while we in America fear the raised eyebrow.” ~Mack Stiles

Judeo-Christian Worldview: Moral Character Education

Judeo-Christian Worldview:

Moral Character Education

Culture Wars

Dear Friends,

Welcome to Western Culture Dinner Topics!

narcissism2                “THE GREAT GOOD AND THE TERRIBLE EVIL IN THE WORLD TODAY ARE THE SWEET AND THE BITTER FRUITS of the rearing of yesterday’s children,” said Gordon B. Hinckley, Christian leader. “As we train a new generation, so will the world be in a few years. If you are worried about the future, then look to the upbringing of your children.”

  Well, the future is here, and many are the bitter fruits.

The most dramatic fruits we see on the scene today are the generation called Millennials, or those who came of age at the turn of the century. They don’t know they are bitter fruits, of course, because they don’t know what they don’t know.

Studies on college campuses show that people of the self-deceived Millennial generation are so self-centered and enslaved to political correctness that they refuse to identify even blatantly wrong behavior. Anyone who points out moral absolutes is considered mean. They also suppress their own moral compass, and refuse to admit that they can do wrong. Since they can do no wrong, it obviously follows that they take no responsibility for their own actions, but have no problem blaming anyone and everyone else.  Everything has to be worded a certain way, or they are offended. They are also used to instant gratification, and have no patience for working through problems that are not solved quickly.

They are educated in public schools, where the plague of moral relativism has infected their minds.  Whatever feels good is ok, and to them, moral absolutes in daily choices are “no big deal.” The Millennial mindset comes of being pampered all their lives, and the chief objective is “self esteem,” whether it is earned or not, and right or wrong is not even factored into it.  As a result of this false self-esteem, their arrogance is astonishing.  Above all, “you must not judge,” or point out if someone is doing wrong. The philosophies of men, mingled with scripture.

greatest-generation3-vs-entitled               How did this happen?

                Let’s go back a little in history. At the close of World War 2, the Greatest Generation had defeated Hitler, but socialism remained at large. Godless socialists launched the greatest culture war of all time.

After the Supreme Court decree of 1963, when God was banished from the schools, the moral absolutes of the Bible disappeared as well. They were replaced by Satan’s deceitful plan of moral relativism, which eliminates right and wrong. Thus anything goes—all are saved in their sins, not from them.

Many parents, caught in this devilish doctrine when raising their children, resorted to what Christian leader Thomas S. Monson calls one of the plagues of our day: permissiveness.

moral-relativism-general            What have we done? When we search for answers, we see a nation once founded on Judeo-Christian moral values, once a beacon of liberty and hope to all the world. Thenceforth we have seen our society regress to immorality, to mass murders, to tyranny, to persecution of Bible believers.

This is what happens when a nation rejects God. With all our so-called education, we have not taught students the one most important truth of all—that God lives, and that He loves us. I feel compassion for our children. We have taken from them the key to happiness—a moral compass. Instead, they are growing up in a society without respect, without common decency—without faith, hope, or love.

quote-look-God-live   Atheism has failed. It produces misery wherever and whenever it is tried. It is time to let go of that failure and return to what works—the Great Plan of Happiness. And where is that plan found? In the Bible.

Our children have been robbed of their birthright of biblical values, cheated out of the plan of happiness, because parents and schools threw away the moral compass vital to God’s children. We owe it to our children to turn away from the philosophy of spiritual death and to once again look to God, and live.

 

Discovering the joys of Moral Character Education,

Christine Davidson

Imparting Biblical Values to Young Adults—Made Easy! Click Here

You are always welcome to share my posts! Please just link back to Epicworld Dinner Topics

Socialism Explained: Permissive Parenting created Socialism as Religion for Millennials

Critical Thinking Topics

Socialism Explained:

Permissive Parenting created Socialism as Religion for Millennials

Permissive Parenting, False Self Esteem are poor Character Education

Rush Limbaugh

CALLER: Hi, Rush.  Last week you said that Alexandria Cortez is like the adult version of this everybody’s wonderful and everybody gets a trophy.  I was thinking about that, and it’s true.  I see this generation as just drowning in a self-esteem that isn’t real, because we’ve rewarded just simple participation. We’ve rewarded kids just for showing up.  I have four boys in this generation; so I know.  The real achievement that builds true self-esteem necessitates hardship and trying and failing. So when we reward kids just for showing up, I think we actually dumb them down. They don’t learn how —

RUSH:  Oh, I agree.

CALLER:  Yeah.  They don’t learn how to think critically.  I think they’re stunted character-wise.  They don’t learn wisdom through life experience.  And then we send them off to the state universities.  My third son is a second-year student in a state university, and last semester he had a self-avowed Marxist professor who had a full-fledged meltdown one day when she was teaching them about how “white males” own the majority of the wealth in the world.  So, if they go into these classrooms and they haven’t learned to think, they don’t have the character, the wisdom, the life experience —

RUSH:  Well, it’s not… You mentioned wisdom.  You’re right about all that.  It’s not just that, though.  It is that they are also taught to resent people from whom they could learn things. They are taught to resent people who have more life experiences, who have more wisdom or advice to offer

Almost Child Abuse to Promise Millennials  the lies of Socialism Utopia

RUSH: But I think it is almost child abuse to create belief systems in kids that they’ve accomplished things when they haven’t, that they’re special simply because they exist, and at any time those circumstances don’t exist, something’s wrong, not with them, but with everybody else. That’s what’s the ticket to socialism. When they are shielded and protected, when their parents become their friends rather than mentors and disciplinarians, eventually these shielded, protected kids are going to encounter obstacles. They’re going to encounter things that have to be overcome.

Millennials need to be told NO

Well, that’s not the world, that’s not life, and if they’re not equipped and not prepared for it. Hello, victimhood the moment they leave home. And once they become part of the victimology class, then they have surrendered control over their own future, over their own existence, and they then become totally dependent on the people promising to provide or take care of whatever. You know, Santa Claus is hard to say “no” to. And people promising utopia.

 

 

Millennials will encounter Adversity

They’re gonna encounter adversity. And, if they’ve never been made to deal with it, if they’ve always been shielded, if any adversity has been presented to them as unfairness or racism or sexism or bigotry, they’re not gonna know how to deal with it. That is what makes them susceptible to pitches like Crazy Bernie’s and all the rest of these Democrats, where everything’s gonna be free and everybody’s gonna be nice and everybody’s gonna be the same and everybody’s gonna be respected. And there won’t be anybody yelling and there won’t be anybody making fun of anybody and there won’t be anybody laughing at other people, none of this.

Well, that’s not the world, that’s not life, and if they’re not equipped and not prepared for it. Hello, victimhood the moment they leave home. And once they become part of the victimology class, then they have surrendered control over their own future, over their own existence, and they then become totally dependent on the people promising to provide or take care of whatever. You know, Santa Claus is hard to say “no” to. And people promising utopia.

Socialism is Failure

There has to be a reason socialism is demonstrable failure every time it’s ever been tried. It’s a demonstrable failure wherever you want to look in practice right now in the world, and yet it remains this overwhelming, attractive, alluring thing. Why? And I think it has to do with immaturity and shelter from adversity.

And, man, when we take successful people and target them and use them as examples of what not to be, when we challenge the legitimacy of successful people by accusing them of stealing it or tricking people out of it or coming by it in some unfair way, rather than inspiring people to be better than they can be, we’re doing great damage to our own society and culture.

And we are there now. I don’t know what percentage of Millennials — there are exceptions to everything. The whole generation’s not this way, obviously. We get calls from a bunch of Millennials who agree with the characterization and share with us how they’ve avoided it and the problems that they encounter by not falling in line with their peers on this kind of thing.

faith-and-freedomInoculate your Children against Socialism and Atheism HERE

Socialism as Religion for Millennials

Arthur Chrenkoff

 

RUSH: I got a great piece here:  “Socialism as a Millennial Religion.”  Let me read a couple of pull quotes here.

 Only 15 Percent of Millennials have Correct Understanding of Socialism

The Millennials can’t remember very much – and they don’t learn very much either. It’s easy being hot for socialism or communism when you actually have a very little idea of what it is and what it did throughout the 20th century. And the Ys have that ignorance in spades; one third of them think that George W Bush killed more people than Stalin and 42 per cent have never heard of Mao – but over 70 per cent agree with Bernie Sanders. Some research suggests that only 15 per cent actually have a correct understanding of socialism.

It’s not just politics; the Millennials are the most woefully undereducated and miseducated generation in a very long time. To be fair, that’s not strictly their fault; that attaches itself again to their Boomer grandparents who have been in charge of our failing education systems during this time. Combine the modern indoctrination-cum-dumbification taking place in schools and universities with the attention span-killing impact of information technology and social media, and you have a barely literate cohort, which is simply not equipped with the necessary mental tools to learn about the real world even if they wanted to.

Any surprises that socialism is now nearly synonymous with Gen Y?

Think of all the traits and characteristics, most of them negative, associated with the Millennials in the popular mind. They are said to be unrealistic and have both the inflated expectations of life and the inflated perceptions of selves. They think the world owes them a living – a good one too – though without necessary too much effort. Things came very easily to them when they were growing up; when that suddenly stops – when the reality finally intrudes – they get angry, frustrated, lost: the world is deeply unfair and is conspiring against them.

Millennial Narcissism

They are narcissistic, self-possessed and self-obsessed. They expect instant rewards and instant gratification. Having been told their whole lives how special they are, they tend to be over-sensitive and find it difficult to cope with criticism or obstacles. They’re lazy, flighty and easily distracted. Remember: these are all generalisations, but stereotypes stick because they ring true.

So no, no surprises here. Their collective personality makes the Millennials unusually suited for the flirtation with socialism. They are a great match; if this was Tinder, Marx would be getting super liked all the time.

Result of Permissive Parenting

Socialism is the response of a spoiled child when faced with the world that does not genuflect to its every wish the way their parents did – the world as it is must therefore be evil and has to be changed to something radically different. Gen Y, of course, did not just magically become the way they are – they were brought up like that, so we all bear the blame and the responsibility for a generation who resents not being managers in their 20s and not being recognised as special anymore by all their elders. Clearly, the capitalism has failed when I’m not showered down with money after I graduate from my double in media and gender studies.

Life is Not Fair

The world indeed is not perfect and it is not always fair, but the sensible response would be to acknowledge how good it actually is, how much better than it has ever been, and how it continues to get better – but that would actually require a decent knowledge of history, for example – and then to think of all the various practical ways we can try to make it better.~Arthur Chrenkoff

Instead, the world is hell, all the previous generations have failed us and we need to turn everything upside down. Viva la revolucion.

In November this year we will celebrate thirty years since the fall of the Berlin Wall. It’s sad and it’s terrifying that in such a short space of time socialism is cool again, but it’s not entirely unexpected – hell of a lot of suckers have been born since 1989.

Solutions for Parents

Moral Character Education Action Plan—START HERE

 

Moral Character Education: Moral Compass Quotes, Integrity Quotes

Moral Character Education:

Moral Compass Quotes, Integrity Quotes

Integrity

The just man walketh in his integrity: his children are blessed after him. ~Proverbs 20:7

All the while my breath is in me, and the spirit of God is in my nostrils; my lips shall not speak wickedness, nor my tongue utter deceit. God forbid. Till I die I will not remove mine integrity from me. ~Job 27:3-5

Out of the well of integrity springs an empowered, sin-resistant generation. ~Joy D. Jones

One of the greatest accomplishments of our lives is to promote an honest, earnest integrity within ourselves. This means that we become spiritually sound, intellectually sincere, morally honest, and always personally responsible to God. Integrity is that golden key which will unlock the door to almost any success. ~Howard W. Hunter

 

Teaching at Home

A father reads to his three young children from the Holy Bible.

We need to teach and help raise a sin-resistant generation. We need [to have] a bedrock understanding of the doctrine of Christ and [to] use that understanding to teach and help raise a sin-resistant generation. ~Russell M. Nelson

Even if “everyone is doing it,” wrong is never right. Evil, error, and darkness will never be truth, even if popular. In fact, 50 million people can be wrong—totally wrong. Immorality is still immorality in the eyes of God. ~Russell M. Nelson

Home life, proper teaching in the home, parental guidance and leadership—these are the panacea for the ailments of the world and its children. They are the cure for spiritual and emotional diseases and the remedy for its problems. Parents should not leave the training of children to others. ~Spencer W. Kimball

No success can compensate for failure in the home. ~David O. McKay

‘The most important of the Lord’s work you will ever do will be the work you do within the walls of your own home.’ ~Harold B. Lee

Train up a child in the way he should go; and when he is old he will not depart from it. ~Proverbs 22:6

It is so obvious that the great good and the terrible evil in the world today are the sweet and the bitter fruits of the rearing of yesterday’s children. As we train a new generation, so will the world be in a few years. If you are worried about the future, then look to the upbringing of your children. ~Gordon B. Hinckley

A man should never neglect his family for business. ~Walt Disney

 

Moral Compass

“True greatness is never a result of a chance occurrence or a onetime effort or achievement. Greatness requires the development of character. It requires a multitude of correct decisions in every day choices between good and evil that Boyd K Packer spoke about when he said, ‘Over the years these little choices will be bundled together and show clearly what we value.’ “Those choices will also show clearly what we are.” ~Howard W. Hunter

“Vice is a monster of so frightful mien
As to be hated needs but to be seen;
Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face,
We first endure, then pity, then embrace.” ― Alexander Pope

Society cannot exist unless a controlling power upon will and appetite be placed somewhere, and the less of it there is within, the more there must be without. It is ordained in the eternal constitution of things, that men of intemperate minds cannot be free. ~Edmund Burke

I look to a day when people will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. ~Martin Luther King, Jr.

Spencer W. Kimball : Love people, not things; use things, not people.

Choose your friends with caution, plan your future with purpose, and frame your life with faith. ~Thomas S. Monson

It has been said that the door of history turns on small hinges, and so do people’s lives. The choices we make determine our destiny. ~Thomas S. Monson

 

For thou, Lord, wilt bless the righteous; with favour wilt thou compass him as with a shield. ~Psalm 5:12

Judeo-Christian Values: Moral Character Education 1—Self Discipline Key to Happy Life

Judeo-Christian values:

Moral Character Education 1—Self Discipline Key to Happy Life

The Rules for a Long and Happy Life

By Robert A. Hall

I

Robert A. Hall served as a Marine in Vietnam, for five terms in the Massachusetts Senate, and for 31 years as an association executive.  He holds a B.A. in government and an M.Ed. in history and has 12 books in print on Amazon.  He retired in 2013 due to pulmonary fibrosis for a lung transplant.  He now works part-time at the Madison V.A. hospital, interviewing veterans and writing up their life stories for their records and their families.

The most important ingredient of a long, happy, and successful life is self-discipline.

You also need to develop resilience and tenacity.  Without these three things, your life will likely be poor, short, and unhappy.  I received them in Marine Corps Boot Camp, Parris Island, in 1964.  If you lack the fortitude or foresight to serve in the military, you need to get them someplace else.

Discipline yourself to maintain a normal weight.  Obesity is the second largest cause of premature death.

Discipline yourself to get regular exercise.  You’ll feel better and live longer.

The most valuable thing you can own is a good reputation.

Take responsibility for your actions.

Stop whining, complaining, and criticizing.  No one will want to be around you.

Stop blaming others.  The person who is responsible for over 90% of your problems is the one you see in the mirror every morning.

Always give more than expected.  Always do more than your share.

If you once tell a major lie, no one will fully trust you again.  If you regularly tell lies, no one will believe you even when you tell the truth.  The same thing if you steal.

Don’t use recreational drugs.  And use alcohol in moderation or not at all.  Addiction always leads to poverty, broken families, ruined lives, and often an early grave.

Don’t smoke or use tobacco.  On average, smokers die ten years before non-smokers.  It is the largest cause of premature death.

Get enough sleep.  Most people need eight to nine hours.  But don’t waste the whole day in bed.

Be slow to take offense, and never on little things, especially those involving taste.

Be slow to anger and quick to forgive.

Everyone has bad days, but don’t inflict them on others.  Greet everyone you meet with a cheery hello.  Even if he doesn’t return the greeting, you’ll feel better.

Culture Wars: Indoctrination in Public Schools vs. Moral Character Education

Culture Wars:

Indoctrination in Public Schools vs. Moral Character Education

For behold, they do study at this time that they may destroy the liberty of thy people. ~Alma 8:17

 

Thanks to A.F. Branco at Legal Insurrection.com for his great cartoons

Rush Limbaugh

RUSH: We’re not quite through with the gun control aspect of this, because that’s the big area, number one, where the left has finally decided they don’t have to lie anymore and they don’t have to pretend. They’ve been saying for years: We don’t want to confiscate every gun. We just want life to be safer in America. We want get rid of the assault rifles. We wanted to get rid of the semiautomatics. We want to get rid of the killing machines. We love our children.

Well, that’s never been the case. Not that they don’t love their children. What’s never been the case is that they only have a few things they want to do. They want total confiscation of every weapon in this country. And if it takes them 20 years, fine and dandy. They don’t put four-year time limits, something the Soviets and communists taught them very well. The Soviet Union never had a time limit on things like we do.

 

It wasn’t that long ago that there were virtues and that there were tenets, there were time-honored traditions, institutions, and philosophies that everybody followed because they were time-honored and believed in, and they worked. And they were all oriented around virtue and morality, doing the right thing, overcoming obstacles, learning how to deal with adversity, not whining, not moaning, not complaining, not becoming a victim.

Once upon a time people learned that good deeds are more important than fine words, that acting on their impulses and seeking instant gratification carry a high price, and that duty and obligation and responsibility to others in the end are the foundations of our political and social order.

“Starting in the postwar fifties, increasing wealth, more time spent in school rather than factories and fields, consumer capitalism’s promotion of impulse-buying, and a culture of materialism that defines the self through fashion, consumption, and popular culture rather than through education, challenges, and character — all exacerbated the flaws of youth that the larger culture once tried to correct, but now indulged.”

So he’s saying that the descent into current pop culture can be traced back to the economic boom of the postwar fifties. He’s not blaming economic booms. He’s not blaming a good economy. What he says is that with the increased wealth per capita, family income, more time spent in school rather than in factories and fields, so more professional training rather than vocational, consumer advertising promoting impulse buying and a culture of materialism as a definition of yourself. And of course yourself is defined by fashion, consumption, pop culture. That’s when it all began.

 “Movies, music, and soon the therapeutic curricula of schools reinforced and glorified these flaws rather than disciplining and correcting them.

So he’s talking about anywhere from 60 to 75 years. So the last 60 to 75 years people have marinated, kids have “marinated in these social and cultural dysfunctions that have resulted in a sense of entitlement and outlandish expectations. Adolescence has been extended far beyond the traditional beginning of adulthood.”

A Great Piece on Teenagers and Gun Control