Socialism Explained: Permissive Parenting created Socialism as Religion for Millennials

Critical Thinking Topics

Socialism Explained:

Permissive Parenting created Socialism as Religion for Millennials

Permissive Parenting, False Self Esteem are poor Character Education

Rush Limbaugh

CALLER: Hi, Rush.  Last week you said that Alexandria Cortez is like the adult version of this everybody’s wonderful and everybody gets a trophy.  I was thinking about that, and it’s true.  I see this generation as just drowning in a self-esteem that isn’t real, because we’ve rewarded just simple participation. We’ve rewarded kids just for showing up.  I have four boys in this generation; so I know.  The real achievement that builds true self-esteem necessitates hardship and trying and failing. So when we reward kids just for showing up, I think we actually dumb them down. They don’t learn how —

RUSH:  Oh, I agree.

CALLER:  Yeah.  They don’t learn how to think critically.  I think they’re stunted character-wise.  They don’t learn wisdom through life experience.  And then we send them off to the state universities.  My third son is a second-year student in a state university, and last semester he had a self-avowed Marxist professor who had a full-fledged meltdown one day when she was teaching them about how “white males” own the majority of the wealth in the world.  So, if they go into these classrooms and they haven’t learned to think, they don’t have the character, the wisdom, the life experience —

RUSH:  Well, it’s not… You mentioned wisdom.  You’re right about all that.  It’s not just that, though.  It is that they are also taught to resent people from whom they could learn things. They are taught to resent people who have more life experiences, who have more wisdom or advice to offer

Almost Child Abuse to Promise Millennials  the lies of Socialism Utopia

RUSH: But I think it is almost child abuse to create belief systems in kids that they’ve accomplished things when they haven’t, that they’re special simply because they exist, and at any time those circumstances don’t exist, something’s wrong, not with them, but with everybody else. That’s what’s the ticket to socialism. When they are shielded and protected, when their parents become their friends rather than mentors and disciplinarians, eventually these shielded, protected kids are going to encounter obstacles. They’re going to encounter things that have to be overcome.

Millennials need to be told NO

Well, that’s not the world, that’s not life, and if they’re not equipped and not prepared for it. Hello, victimhood the moment they leave home. And once they become part of the victimology class, then they have surrendered control over their own future, over their own existence, and they then become totally dependent on the people promising to provide or take care of whatever. You know, Santa Claus is hard to say “no” to. And people promising utopia.

 

 

Millennials will encounter Adversity

They’re gonna encounter adversity. And, if they’ve never been made to deal with it, if they’ve always been shielded, if any adversity has been presented to them as unfairness or racism or sexism or bigotry, they’re not gonna know how to deal with it. That is what makes them susceptible to pitches like Crazy Bernie’s and all the rest of these Democrats, where everything’s gonna be free and everybody’s gonna be nice and everybody’s gonna be the same and everybody’s gonna be respected. And there won’t be anybody yelling and there won’t be anybody making fun of anybody and there won’t be anybody laughing at other people, none of this.

Well, that’s not the world, that’s not life, and if they’re not equipped and not prepared for it. Hello, victimhood the moment they leave home. And once they become part of the victimology class, then they have surrendered control over their own future, over their own existence, and they then become totally dependent on the people promising to provide or take care of whatever. You know, Santa Claus is hard to say “no” to. And people promising utopia.

Socialism is Failure

There has to be a reason socialism is demonstrable failure every time it’s ever been tried. It’s a demonstrable failure wherever you want to look in practice right now in the world, and yet it remains this overwhelming, attractive, alluring thing. Why? And I think it has to do with immaturity and shelter from adversity.

And, man, when we take successful people and target them and use them as examples of what not to be, when we challenge the legitimacy of successful people by accusing them of stealing it or tricking people out of it or coming by it in some unfair way, rather than inspiring people to be better than they can be, we’re doing great damage to our own society and culture.

And we are there now. I don’t know what percentage of Millennials — there are exceptions to everything. The whole generation’s not this way, obviously. We get calls from a bunch of Millennials who agree with the characterization and share with us how they’ve avoided it and the problems that they encounter by not falling in line with their peers on this kind of thing.

faith-and-freedomInoculate your Children against Socialism and Atheism HERE

Socialism as Religion for Millennials

Arthur Chrenkoff

 

RUSH: I got a great piece here:  “Socialism as a Millennial Religion.”  Let me read a couple of pull quotes here.

 Only 15 Percent of Millennials have Correct Understanding of Socialism

The Millennials can’t remember very much – and they don’t learn very much either. It’s easy being hot for socialism or communism when you actually have a very little idea of what it is and what it did throughout the 20th century. And the Ys have that ignorance in spades; one third of them think that George W Bush killed more people than Stalin and 42 per cent have never heard of Mao – but over 70 per cent agree with Bernie Sanders. Some research suggests that only 15 per cent actually have a correct understanding of socialism.

It’s not just politics; the Millennials are the most woefully undereducated and miseducated generation in a very long time. To be fair, that’s not strictly their fault; that attaches itself again to their Boomer grandparents who have been in charge of our failing education systems during this time. Combine the modern indoctrination-cum-dumbification taking place in schools and universities with the attention span-killing impact of information technology and social media, and you have a barely literate cohort, which is simply not equipped with the necessary mental tools to learn about the real world even if they wanted to.

Any surprises that socialism is now nearly synonymous with Gen Y?

Think of all the traits and characteristics, most of them negative, associated with the Millennials in the popular mind. They are said to be unrealistic and have both the inflated expectations of life and the inflated perceptions of selves. They think the world owes them a living – a good one too – though without necessary too much effort. Things came very easily to them when they were growing up; when that suddenly stops – when the reality finally intrudes – they get angry, frustrated, lost: the world is deeply unfair and is conspiring against them.

Millennial Narcissism

They are narcissistic, self-possessed and self-obsessed. They expect instant rewards and instant gratification. Having been told their whole lives how special they are, they tend to be over-sensitive and find it difficult to cope with criticism or obstacles. They’re lazy, flighty and easily distracted. Remember: these are all generalisations, but stereotypes stick because they ring true.

So no, no surprises here. Their collective personality makes the Millennials unusually suited for the flirtation with socialism. They are a great match; if this was Tinder, Marx would be getting super liked all the time.

Result of Permissive Parenting

Socialism is the response of a spoiled child when faced with the world that does not genuflect to its every wish the way their parents did – the world as it is must therefore be evil and has to be changed to something radically different. Gen Y, of course, did not just magically become the way they are – they were brought up like that, so we all bear the blame and the responsibility for a generation who resents not being managers in their 20s and not being recognised as special anymore by all their elders. Clearly, the capitalism has failed when I’m not showered down with money after I graduate from my double in media and gender studies.

Life is Not Fair

The world indeed is not perfect and it is not always fair, but the sensible response would be to acknowledge how good it actually is, how much better than it has ever been, and how it continues to get better – but that would actually require a decent knowledge of history, for example – and then to think of all the various practical ways we can try to make it better.~Arthur Chrenkoff

Instead, the world is hell, all the previous generations have failed us and we need to turn everything upside down. Viva la revolucion.

In November this year we will celebrate thirty years since the fall of the Berlin Wall. It’s sad and it’s terrifying that in such a short space of time socialism is cool again, but it’s not entirely unexpected – hell of a lot of suckers have been born since 1989.

Solutions for Parents

Moral Character Education Action Plan—START HERE

 

Advertisements

Critical Thinking: Character Values vs. Political Correctness, Leftist Views, and Self Esteem

Critical Thinking:

Character Values vs. Political Correctness, Leftist Views, and Self Esteem

 

“Does it Do Good?” vs. “Does it Feel Good?”

Why socialist policies are so popular—but so harmful

 

keyThese [leftists] are using a technique that is as old as the human race,—a fervid but false solicitude for the unfortunate over whom they thus gain mastery, and then enslave them. ~ David O. McKay

 

Dennis Prager

A fundamental difference between the left and right concerns how each assesses public policies. The right asks, “Does it do good?” The left asks a different question, [as shown in the following examples].

1) Minimum Wage

1987

The New York Times editorialized against any minimum wage. The title of the editorial said it all –“The Right Minimum Wage: $0.00”

redistsocialismillustrated              There’s a virtual consensus among economists,” wrote the Times editorial, “that the minimum wage is an idea whose time has passed. Raising the minimum wage by a substantial amount would price working poor people out of the job market. …More important, it would increase unemployment … The idea of using a minimum wage to overcome poverty is old, honorable—and fundamentally flawed.”

Why did the New York Times editorialize against the minimum wage? Because it asked the conservative question: “Does it do good?”

27 years later

The New York Times editorial page wrote the very opposite of what it had written in 1987, and called for a major increase in the minimum wage. In that time, the page had moved further left and was now preoccupied not with what does good—but with income inequality, which feels bad. It lamented the fact that a low hourly minimum wage had not “softened the hearts of its opponents”—Republicans and their supporters.

 

2) Affirmative Action

Study after study—and, even more important, common sense and facts—have shown the deleterious effects that race-based affirmative action have had on black students. Lowering college admissions standards for black applicants has ensured at least two awful results.

One is that more black students fail to graduate college—because they have too often been admitted to a college that demands more academic rigor than they were prepared for. Rather than attend a school that matches their skills, a school where they might thrive, they fail at a school where they are over-matched.

The other result is that many, if not most, black students feel a dark cloud hanging over them. They suspect that other students wonder whether they, the black students, were admitted into the college on merit or because standards were lowered.

It would seem that the last question supporters of race-based affirmative action ask is, “Does it do good?”

 

3) Pacifism

reagan-peace-strengthThe left has a soft spot for pacifism—the belief that killing another human being is always immoral [unless it is killing unborn babies]. Not all leftists are pacifists, but pacifism emanates from the left, and just about all leftists support “peace activism,” … and whatever else contains the word “peace.”

The right, on the other hand, while just as desirous of peace as the left—what conservative parent wants their child to die in battle?—knows that pacifism and most “peace activists” increase the chances of war, not peace.

Nothing guarantees the triumph of evil like refusing to fight it. Great evil is therefore never defeated by peace activists, but by superior military might. The Allied victory in World War II is an obvious example. American military might likewise contained and ultimately ended Soviet communism.

reagan-quote-appeasement               Supporters of pacifism, peace studies, American nuclear disarmament, American military withdrawal form countries ins which it has fought—Iraq is the most recent example—do not ask, “Does it do good?”

Did the withdrawal of America from Iraq do good? Of course not. It only led to the rise of Islamic State with its mass murder and torture.

 

                So, then, if in assessing what public policies to pursue, conservatives ask “Does it do good?” what question do liberals ask? The answer is, “Does it make people—including myself—feel good?”

Why do liberals support a higher minimum wage if doesn’t do good? Because intakes the recipients of the higher wage feel good (even if other workers lose their jobs when restaurants and other businesses that cannot afford the higher wage close down) and it makes liberals feel good about themselves: “We liberals, unlike conservatives, have soft hearts.”

Why do liberals support race-based affirmative action? For the same reasons. It makes the recipients feel good when they are admitted to more prestigious colleges. And it makes liberals feel good about themselves for appearing to right the wrongs of historical racism.

The same holds true for left-wing peace activism: Supporting “peace” rather than the military makes liberals feel good about themselves.

narcissismThe Folly of the Self-Esteem Movement

Perhaps the best example is the self-esteem movement. It has had an almost wholly negative effect on a generation of Americans raised to have high self-esteem without having earned it. They then suffer from narcissism and an incapacity to deal with life’s inevitable setbacks. But self-esteem feels good.

And feelings—not reason—is what liberalism is largely about. Reason asks: “Does it do good?” Liberalism asks, “Does it feel good?”

 

Character Education, Social Media, and Earning Self Esteem

Character Education, Social Media, and Earning Self Esteem

Finding Self-Worth in a Selfie World

What if pouring yourself—the good and the hidden—into those around and beyond you afforded you the kind of self-worth you can’t get from social media or one of the thousands of self-help books crowding our shelves?

By Henry Unga

self-esteem-worth-SelfieworldI was 28 years old when my wife was diagnosed with a terminal lung disease. And beyond how many friends I had, how good-looking I felt I was, how respected I was by my peers, how glamorous or rich I was or wasn’t, my understanding of self-worth became how I used my new pain and past experiences to acquire the compassion necessary to truly love someone other than myself. And what if that’s the secret? What if pouring yourself—the good and the hidden—into those around and beyond you afforded you the kind of self-worth you can’t get from social media or one of the thousands of self-help books crowding our shelves? What if outward compassion rather than inward reflection is the barometer with which God measures our intended purpose and value? Well, I think it might be. Or at least it’s a strong component. Because I’ve never felt more worthy as a son of God than when I first started washing my wife’s hair because lifting her own arms to shampoo her hair became too much for her lungs to handle. I’ve never felt so purposeful and satisfied than when I made the obvious choice of disappearing into the full-time care and round-the-clock concern of a most precious and delicate daughter of God.

Maybe not having friends in 5th grade meant I wasn’t being a friend to my classmates. Maybe not feeling attractive in high school meant I needed to step away from my mirror and look out my window. Maybe not receiving the leadership roles I felt I needed in order to really make a difference as a missionary meant that I wasn’t fully serving those closest to me—my missionary companions and the families who were looking to us for gospel understanding. Maybe feeling enslaved to a job that wasn’t the coolest or most lucrative meant that I didn’t yet understand that it would be outside the hours of 9 to 5 where my happiest, hardest, and most sacred work would be done. And maybe feeling cheated by 78 “likes” on a posted picture that I thought deserved a million means I’ve swung too far from what I once understood about self-worth and have parlayed my divine identity into an idea of someone I’m not quite and perhaps never will be.

I’m now 29 years old. And maybe that’s too young to know exactly who or what I am. But being 29 is probably old enough to know what I’m not. I know I’m not merely a resume or a cultural demographic or a body type or a tax bracket or a profile picture. And I know I’m not reduced to those arbitrary things because I know I am more than simply myself.

I am what I am to my wife and to my friends and family and to my neighbors and coworkers and fellow freeway drivers. I am what I am to the 54-year-old server who cleans up after me and thanks me for coming in even though I under-tipped. I am what I am to the person who doesn’t like me and especially to the person I’m not too fond of either. I am what I am to those I should be serving more, to those I should be reaching out to more, to those I should be writing to instead of writing this. I am how I love others because that’s one of the few things I can actually control in this life, and it’s possibly the only way I can tangibly measure my true self-worth. But mostly, I am how I love others because that’s all God asks of me—and because that’s all I can give Him. And maybe that’s good enough.